Go back to the enewsletter This winter Luke Mangan

first_imgGo back to the enewsletterThis winter Luke Mangan welcomes Australia’s celebrity chef Maggie Beer into the kitchen at his signature restaurant glass brasserie.The culinary duo will be serving up a collaborative winter menu that features a series of delicious seasonal dishes packed full of quality produce from around New South Wales and Maggie’s home state, South Australia.Maggie’s signature dishes including her Mustard pear stuffed chicken breast with crushed parsnip and jus, made with pears from her orchard in the Barossa; Seville marmalade glazed pork belly with verjuice, potato puree and cavolo nero; and her Cumin roasted sweet potato and black barley with tahini and Persian feta, will sit on glass brasserie’s $29 Wine Bar Lunch Menu, which is served weekdays with a complimentary glass of wine.Those with a sweet-tooth are encouraged to upgrade their experience to include Maggie’s signature Verjuice custards with bergamot-braised raisin clusters, which will feature on the dessert menu.One of the only hatted restaurants in Sydney to offer a premium ‘power lunch’ of this caliber, the $29 Wine Bar Lunch Menu, is ideal for city workers or friends looking for quality food, efficient service and a memorable experience.Its approachable price point allows Sydneysiders the chance to enjoy dishes made by one of Australia’s celebrity chefs without having to break the bank, board a flight to Barossa, or whip out an apron and one of Maggie’s signature cookbooks.“At glass we pride ourselves on providing our guests with the best possible dining experience teamed with the finest quality food and produce. I love the idea of partnering with like-minded chefs who can bring something really special to the table,” Mangan said.“Maggie’s reputation and longstanding position as one of Australia’s most loved chefs speaks for itself. I have thoroughly enjoyed spending time in the kitchen with Maggie and I am excited to serve up these new dishes to our guests at glass,” he added.Beer remarks, “Being able to work alongside Luke and his team is a real privilege. I am extremely passionate about local produce, so I’m thrilled to be able to bring a bit of the Barossa with me as part of this collaboration. My only hope is that Sydney gets as much joy out of eating these dishes as I did in making them.”Both Luke and Maggie share a common goal to champion great Australian produce and dining experiences for their customers, and this new menu is the perfect representation of that.The offer is available Monday to Friday from 12-2pm until 31 August, 2018.To make a reservation at glass brasserie please visit: www.glassbrasserie.com.auGo back to the enewsletterlast_img read more

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New study reveals transmission of NDMbacteria between dogs and humans

first_imgJul 9 2018In 2015, a New Delhi -metallo-beta-lactamase (NDM) Escherichia coli bacteria was discovered in two Finnish dogs. An article recently published in the journal Eurosurveillance reveals that the dogs’ owner did also carry the bacterium. This is presumably the first time in the world that the transmission of NDM-bacteria between a dog and a human has been reported.”We were able, through the analysis of the genome of the bacteria, to conclude that the bacterial isolates from the dogs and humans were identical, which means that they were transmitted between dogs and humans,” says DVM (PhD) Thomas Grönthal, the corresponding author of the study, at the Faculty of veterinary medicine, University of Helsinki.The bacteria had been transmitted between dogs and humansRelated StoriesNew methods to recognize antimicrobial resistant bacteria and how they workBacteria in the birth canal linked to lower risk of ovarian cancerRaw meat can act as reservoir for bacteria associated with hospital infectionsThe NDM-bacteria that had originally been isolated from ear specimens from two dogs in the same family initiated an investigation about the spread and origin of the bacteria. Specimens were also taken from family members and the dogs. The relatedness of the bacteria were investigated by examining the nucleotide sequence of their genome. The study was a collaboration between the University of Helsinki, the National Institute of Health and Welfare, and the Finnish Food Safety Authority Evira.An extremely resistant NDM-5 producing bacterial strain was isolated from the family dogs and one of the family members. In addition, both dogs and two family members carried a multidrug-resistant ESBL bacterium. The NDM and ESBL bacterial strains that were isolated from the dogs and humans were identical. The humans were asymptomatic. The origin of the NDM bacteria was not discovered in this study.The use of antibiotics propagates the selection of resistant strains”We could not show with certainty in which direction the bacteria had transmitted. However, especially the NDM-bacteria probably moved from human to dog as these bacteria have not previously been identified in animals in Finland,” assesses docent and leader of the research Merja Rantala from the University of Helsinki.”The use of carbapenem antibiotics in animals is prohibited in Finland, but the dogs had received numerous other antibiotics. This gave the NDM-bacteria a competitive edge and enabled them to persist in the dogs,” says Rantala.Are carbapenemase-producing bacteria becoming more common in animals?This study is presumably the first where the transfer of NDM-bacteria between dogs and humans has been demonstrated. The NDM-5 bacterium is very rare in dogs; it has only been isolated in Algeria previously. Other carbapenem-resistant bacteria have been reported in dogs in the United States, France and Germany. They are, however, being reported in animals at an increasing pace. The research group recommends that laboratories investigating animal specimens should monitor the susceptibility of bacteria to carbapenems and extended spectrum cephalosporins. Source:https://www.helsinki.fi/en/news/life-science/the-transmission-of-ndm-bacteria-between-dogs-and-humans-has-been-established-for-the-first-timelast_img read more

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