Borrower Benefits Men Vs Women

first_img If you’re a man, it seems your home loan application has a greater chance of getting a green light than a woman’s in your same age range, so reports Ellie Mae’s latest Millennial Tracker, an interactive online tool that provides access to up-to-date demographic data points about homebuyers born between the years 1980 and 1999.Millennial men who were listed as the primary borrower for a loan gained approval for an average amount of $197,820 in October, the study notes. On the other hand, Millennial women got a go-ahead for an average loan amount of $186,567, or $11,253 less than Millennial men.All that data aside, while women got the nod for lower loan amounts, they closed their loans quicker. On the average, it took women 42 days to close, regardless of whether the loan was for a purchase or a refinance. Alternatively, men spent an average of 43 days to seal the deal on a purchase loan and 45 days for a refi. Additionally, women also were approved with lower FICO scores than men. For purchase loans, women had an average score of 721 versus 726 for men. Women who refinanced had an average FICO score of 730, while their male counterparts posted an average FICO score of 735.And all you single ladies, take note: Although males make up the larger percentage of overall Millennial borrowers, most of them are married, Ellie Mae reveals.“An interesting trend we’ve been tracking all year is that single women are buying homes much more than single men,” said Joe Tyrrell, EVP of Corporate Strategy at Ellie Mae. “Sixty percent of women who were listed as the primary borrower in October were single, compared to 42 percent of men.”As for where Millennial male and female primary borrowers were more likely to invest in a nest: Both cohorts have their hearts set on the Midwest, where housing costs continue to be attractive. Marshall, Minnesota; Victoria, Texas; and Lawton, Oklahoma, charted as the top three Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAs) for Millennial homebuyers in October.  Share December 7, 2017 636 Views Borrower Benefits: Men Vs. Womencenter_img Ellie Mae HOUSING joe tyrrell Millennial Tracker mortgage 2017-12-07 Alison Rich in Daily Dose, Data, Featured, Newslast_img read more

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Surprise There are four species of giraffe not one

first_imgGerald couldn’t dance; Abigail couldn’t count; and Geoffrey was a klutz. Now, these gangly storybook giraffes, with their long necks, legs, eyelashes, and prehensile purple tongues, have to worry too about what species they are. A closer look at the genetics of Africa’s giraffes suggests that Giraffa camelopardalis really represents four distinct species. With an estimated 90,000 browsing the savanna treetops, this charismatic animal is one that most conservationists have not been too worried about. But, if this new family tree holds up, one species numbers fewer than 5000 individuals, making it one of the world’s more endangered mammals. The new classification came about after researchers from the Giraffe Conservation Foundation in Namibia collected skin samples from 190 giraffes throughout Africa. They asked researchers in Germany to analyze the DNA in these samples. Given how mobile giraffes are, one would expect a lot of interbreeding, so the researchers were surprised by how different the DNA could be—some genetic differences greater than those between a grizzly and a polar bear, which are separate species. Thus, the team reports online today in Current Biology that, based on their genetic differences, the continent’s nine subspecies really break down into four true species that separated between 1.25 million and 2 million years ago. They may still interbreed, but group in these four genetically distinct categories. The new categorization divides these animals into the southern giraffe (G. giraffa), the Masai giraffe (G. tippelskirchi), the reticulated giraffe (G. reticulata), and the northern giraffe (G. camelopardalis). There are more than 40,000 southern giraffes, but fewer than 5000 northern giraffes, and given that the total giraffe population has dropped from 150,000 to about 90,000 in the past 30 years, northern giraffes could be in trouble in the near future, the researchers say.last_img read more

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