MEPC puts Heathrow parks on market

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Scottish bank moves to Brum

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Dutch low-cost DC schemes approach €10bn in assets

first_imgThe invested capital run by PPIs – low-cost defined contribution schemes – in the Netherlands amounted to €9.7bn at the end of the first quarter of this year, marking a growth of 20% compared to the fourth quarter of 2018.According to data from Dutch regulator De Nederlandsche Bank (DNB), the number of active members increased by 11% in the same period to almost 44,000. Almost half of the capital increase, €814m, was from returns on investment, while 30% (€503m) was attributed to newly transferred pension plans. More than a quarter of the increase (€429m) was from contributions.The growth of 20% compared to the previous quarter was the largest increase since the end of 2015. Compared to a year earlier, the PPIs saw their combined assets under management grow by 40%. This was more than the 32% increase recorded for the same period a year earlier, but a lot lower than previous annual growth, with data showing increases of 64% in 2017, 107% in 2016 and 202% in 2015. This concerns the total amount of invested capital at members’ risk. PPIs still manage only a fraction of the capital invested across all workplace pension plans in the Netherlands. According to DNB, the invested capital at the end of the first quarter amounted to €1.4trn in defined benefit and similar schemes, while defined contribution-type schemes managed €6.2bn. Meanwhile 770,000 members have their pension assets housed at a PPI. The number of active members grew in the first quarter to almost 440,000, an increase of 11% compared to a quarter earlier. In addition, there were 330,000 deferred members, 7% more than three months earlier.last_img read more

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English Premier League agrees on number of substitutes for season restart

first_imgRelatedPosts EPL: Gunners gun for West Ham scalp EPL: Red Devils attack Palace Leeds host first Premier League game after 16 years English Premier League clubs will be able to use five substitutes rather than the usual three when the season resumes on June 17, it was announced on Thursday.The changes will be temporary so as to mitigate the packed schedule clubs will have after a three-month suspension to the season caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. There are 92 outstanding fixtures with the majority of teams facing nine matches in a six-week period.“For the remainder of the 2019/2020 season, the number of substitutes that can be used during a match will increase from three to five players,” a Premier League statement said after a meeting of shareholders on Thursday.“This is in line with the temporary law amendment made by the International Football Association Board (IFAB) last month.”Clubs will be able to have nine substitutes on the bench, up from the usual seven.Reuters/NAN. Tags: English Premier LeagueRulesSeason RestartSubstitutionslast_img read more

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Jacksonville teacher arrested for steal prescription drugs from coworker

first_imgAuthorities have charged a teacher with grand theft after they say, they believe she may have stolen prescription drugs from a coworker.According to the report, the Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office received a call on February 19th from an employee at Duval Charter School at Southside.The victim told authorities that she had three Adderall pills in her purse but when she went to take the prescription, the pills were no longer there and she believes they may have been stolen.Investigators viewed the security tape at the school and found that Megan Mary Jones who also teaches at the school, was the only one who went in and out of the classroom while the victim’s things were left unattended.Jones has since been charged with grand theft of a controlled substance.last_img

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GMR&SC Reaction drag race meet … Surinamese competitors ready to rumble

first_imgTHE Surinamese competitors are here and have sent an ominous message ahead of this weekend’s Reaction drag race meet, organised by the Guyana Motor Racing and Sports Club (GMR&SC).Chronicle Sport caught up with Raul Van Zichem, one of the members who promised dominance from the team, which includes eight cars and three motorcycles.“We are very excited for the race on Sunday. To the Guyanese fans, I’m saying, check us out on the 19th for the reaction drag. We are going to give a great show and we are fully prepared.”He continued, “We have brought eight cars and three bikes and they are going to be fast. There is our surprise Honda that’s always improving; it does 10 seconds in the quarter-mile but what’s under there (the hood) is a big secret and it gets faster and faster.”Meanwhile, preparation work at the track has been ongoing all day yesterday with reports indicating that all is set for free practice and test and tune tomorrow.According to a source, the lights and sensors were tested earlier today and are ready for action this weekend.Official free runs for the event start at 09:00hrs with Qualifying set for an hour after and Knockout set for 11:00hrs. Admission is $1 000 for adults and kids under 12 years of age will pay $500.last_img read more

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Students teach finance to local high school students

first_imgLearning how to manage personal finances might not be on the minds of most high school students, but a group of USC students has started a volunteer organization on campus to teach local high schoolers how to do just that.Money · Chirag Sagar, the founder of USC’s Moneythink, teaches students at Roosevelt High School in Los Angeles how to open a bank account. Teams of two mentors from USC visit a class period once a week. – Photo courtesy of Chirag Sagar Moneythink is a national organization that sends college mentors into local high school classrooms to teach programs geared toward helping students make smart decisions about their money. The USC chapter was started by a student to help inner-city Los Angeles students, and currently has 10 volunteer mentors teaching in five classrooms.Chirag Sagar, a junior majoring in business administration and founder of the Moneythink chapter at USC, said the organization empowers urban youth with instruction in “entrepreneurship, financial literacy and financial life skills” in an attempt to teach them skills necessary to effectively manage personal finances. Lessons include how to open a bank account and conduct basic investing strategies to help students who might not learn these skills otherwise.Teams of two mentors visit a class period once a week for around seven weeks to teach a program focused on either finance or entrepreneurship. Sagar said the high school students respond well to the lessons because they relate better to a college mentor than an adult teacher.“We provide a network, resources and an opportunity to inner-city kids to become successful,” Sagar said. “We’re trying to help those kids out, motivate them and show them a way to become successful outside of just school itself.”The Moneythink curriculum focuses on financial skills because most high schools provide little education in that area. Sagar said students can often graduate with little knowledge of how to manage their own finances.“What we found is only about 35 percent of students are taught financial literacy,” Sagar said. “There’s no financial literacy curriculum in high schools, apart from in about seven to 10 states total. What it comes down to is, 16 – 18-year-olds need to know how to manage their money.”The organization’s focus on serving more underprivileged schools reflects a larger trend in USC service groups that is evident in programs like the Good Neighbors Campaign and Neighborhood Academic Initiative.“I’m interested in education, especially with lower-income and inner-city students,” said Jem Jebbia, a junior majoring in business entrepreneurship and Moneythink mentor. “It’s really a perfect way to tie together entrepreneurship and learning.”Moneythink was initially developed by students at the University of Chicago in September 2008 and has since expanded to 22 universities nationwide, with plans to spread to China and India.The chapter at USC was officially started in the fall, and more mentors were added this semester, but Sagar had already begun to lay the foundations for the organization when he first got involved in April 2009.Sagar’s friend Ted Gonder helped to found the program at the University of Chicago and, when Sagar heard about the program, he became interested.“Then a teacher at Roosevelt High in L.A. found out about his program, called the Financial Education Initiative at the time, and said she wanted it to be in L.A.,” Sagar said. “Ted contacted me and asked if I could do this, so I taught a two-day session. Once I saw the impact that we had, I was committed to creating a chapter at USC.”Despite the organization’s fledgling status at USC, Sagar sees great potential for the program’s development.He hopes to double the number of mentors teaching the program from 10 to upward of 20 for next year and to get advisers and professional entrepreneurs involved with the program as well. Ultimately, he wants the chapter to be a self-sustaining organization that can continue after he graduates.Those involved in Moneythink believe the program will remain successful because of the rewards it provides to the mentors who teach the classes as well as to the students themselves.“It’s really inspiring to see students respond even just a little bit to what you’re teaching them,” Jebbia said. “The content that we’re teaching is important, but the bigger picture is that we’re there representing college students and USC in general, and they can see that we’ve been successful in pursuing higher education. It’s an open door for them that shows they might be able to do it, too.”last_img read more

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Schafer: On senior day, keep those shoulder pads on as long as possible

first_img Published on November 26, 2019 at 6:09 pm Two days after Thanksgiving, Syracuse and Wake Forest will strap up for a seemingly meaningless football game. At 4-7, Syracuse is all but eliminated from bowl contention. For 8-3 Wake Forest, any outcome still results in a bowl game appearance but not a spot in the conference championship. The game’s final score is in many ways irrelevant, but that doesn’t mean the game, and the moments before and after, will be. At least not for Syracuse’s seniors. After losing to Louisville last weekend, the Orange need a miracle, including several teams denying bowl bids, to extend their season to December. That means for 22 seniors, Saturday could be their last time playing competitive football. In an otherwise lost season, one that was expected to be so much more, the potential final curtain call of their football careers provides significance to an otherwise inconsequential Saturday. Sure, there’s always the NFL, but only 14 former Orange players have been drafted since 2010. Maybe there’s the Canadian Football League or arena football. Perhaps random spring leagues will continue to pop up. Regardless, those games won’t be the same. Just ask Dino Babers. His last football memory remains a few plays on a bum knee at the end of a Canadian preseason game, which culminated in him being cut without compensation.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSo now Babers is forced to coach instead of play. Football isn’t like most sports. There’s no emulating an 11-on-11 scrap with helmets and shoulder pads. No beer league softball or Sunday morning pickup basketball runs. When football careers end, they end for good. “I love football too much,” senior Kenneth Ruff said about continuing to play somewhere. “I don’t want to let it go.”Max Freund | Staff PhotographerThe truth is, I never wanted to let football go either. I grew up on the field, performed well enough to play low-end college but chose Syracuse and journalism instead. Over the past month, as this Syracuse season solidified itself as a disappointment, it reminded me of my last season of football. We finished 5-6, Mansfield High School’s worst finish since at least the turn of the century. I’ll never forget the tears that rolled down my face after a blown lead on Thanksgiving Day officially made it a losing season. I wasn’t just losing a football game that day, I was losing a passion I’d been committed to longer than anything else in my life.The emotions poured out to match my grandfather’s. He’d been there before too. Football was ending and a shaking hug from Grampy was keeping it alive for just a few moments longer. I wanted that final postgame embrace on the football field to last forever. The bus ride home wasn’t long enough either. Nor were the parting words from Coach Redding. Throughout all of it, the shoulder pads stayed on. When they came off, it’d all be over. I wasn’t ready for that, not yet. So now I’m writing, hoping to see the athlete I can never be again, and truly never was, in the players I’m covering. They say they want to stick with the sport too, perhaps coach or find a way to keep playing. The games taught them too much to give it up and they’re not sure what they’d do with the free time. Right now they’re busy, caught up in the beautiful monotony of meetings and practice. When it’s over, that all goes away and there’s no way to get it back. Evan Adams started playing around the time his dad died during grade school. He was angry back then, he said, and football taught him restraint. The sport showed him there’s a time and place to release his emotions.   Personal beefs across the line of scrimmage can’t interfere with the team goal. There are too many members on a football team to only worry about yourself. That’s no different in an office or a newsroom.“The same way I play football is the same way I go about things in life,” Adams said. Max Freund | Staff PhotographerI asked Lakiem Williams what he’d remember most when it’s all over. He said it was the bond he built with fellow senior linebacker Andrew Armstrong. They supported each other during Syracuse’s Friday summer conditioning runs that were so hard they wouldn’t want to move for the rest of the weekend. I had my own Armstrong, his name was Matt Kashtan. My best friend from a few streets over kept me steady during our “Fun Friday” runs too. He’s the teary-eyed brother I sat with in the locker room on Thanksgiving, delaying our family dinners, unsure why we had to take the pads off. I didn’t have the heart to tell Lakiem it’s not the same when it’s just you and your headphones lifting weights at the rec center. On the Saturday after Thanksgiving at 12:30 p.m., have a last look at Adams, belly hanging and trash-talk slinging, before he attempts to fold a defender in half. Watch Williams, perhaps the most frequently smiling football player I’ve ever met, chase down a running back in the backfield. See Moe Neal, a staple in the Syracuse offense for four years, search for a final touchdown in the Carrier Dome. Enjoy the seniors, all 22 of them, as they finish their final Saturday of football certainty with a crew they’ve been together with for the majority of college, a time period many recall as the fondest of their lives. Lost seasons will exist in the history books forever. But it’s the things that happen within them that are truly memorable. As the seniors stroll the Carrier Dome field one last time during the senior walk after the game, none of the results will matter. It’s just a final moment to take it all in. A final moment, to keep those pads on their shoulders just a little bit longer. Because once the pads come off, they’ll never come back on, no matter how much we wish they could. Josh Schafer is a senior staff writer for The Daily Orange where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at jlschafe@syr.edu or on Twitter @Schafer_44 Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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County Senior Football Championship results

first_imgClonmel Commercials and Cahir threw in at half three.Cahir took an early lead with a goal in the first minute or so of the game, and they followed it up with a second in the fifth minute.It looked to be an exciting game, however, as Clonmel fought their way back into it to take the win.That game finished up Commercials 21, Cahir 3-8.Then this evening Drom& Inch face JK Brackens in Templetuohy at 6; Kilsheelan-Kilcash take on Killenaule in Monroe at 7 and Moyle Rovers play Aherlow Gaels in Cahir at 7. In the County Senior Football Championship Galtee Rovers took on Ardfinnan in New Inn.Half time there saw Galtee rovers leading 1-8 to 6 points.The final score there was Galtee Rovers 3-10, Ardfinnan 12 points.last_img

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Nwosu Downplays Cameroon’s Threat to Eagles

first_imgNwosu, who captained the national team in the mid1980s, in exclusive insights he shared with THISDAY last night, said the Eagles should not lose the urge to secure the 2018 World Cup ticket in spite of Cameroon’s triumphant outing at the Africa Cup of Nations in Gabon.Nigeria currently seats on top of a very tough Group B which has Cameroon, Zambia and Algeria with six points, and will hope to consolidate the position when Eagles rekindle their rivalry with the Lions in Uyo and Yaounde in decisive ties.Nwosu not only placed a bet on Nigeria to subdue their adversaries in the crucial fixtures, he said he was not impressed by the quality of the Cameroonians despite their exploits in Gabon where they beat Egypt 2-1 to claim their fifth Africa Cup of Nations title.The former Eagles midfielders said the Lions, coached by Belgian Hugo Broos, were not spectacular and warned that Nigeria would give their eastern flank neighbours the psychological edge if they begin to develop jitters before the real battle.“There is nothing special about this current Cameroon squad. Yes, they won the Africa Cup of Nations but they were not spectacular in my opinion. They owed their success in Gabon to determination. I watched when they forced a 1-1 draw with Zambia in Limbe in November 2016.“I stayed back to watch the match in Cameroon as I was being honoured in the country and what I saw did not impress me. They were suspect from the right back position that featured Joel Matip. We should pack our midfield, put a player to block their right back and attack from the left,” Nwosu proffered.According to him, though he watched a couple of matches involving Cameroon in Gabon, he felt they were outplayed by Ghana’s Black Stars which should have prevailed in the semi-final tie.Nwosu admitted that Eagles have been playing well since the arrival of Franco-German Gernot Rohr as the national coach and added that the group should use the six months break before the matches to get focused rather than pander to panic buttons.“Look, Nigeria is good enough with the calibre of players Rohr is bringing up. We can beat Cameroon. In the past, they used to be our nemesis, but not anymore. We can beat them home and away and in the worst case scenario, we can secure a draw in Yaounde,” Nwosu concludes Nwosu who was the youngest member of the Green Eagles when Nigeria won the 1980 AFCON at home in Lagos.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegram *Insists the five-time African champions can be caged in Uyo and YaoundeOlawale AjimotokanOne of Nigeria’s greats, Henry Nwosu (MON) has sent a message of inspiration to the Super Eagles ahead of the crunchy meeting with the Indomitable Lions of Cameroon in August -September this year when the 2018 World Cup qualifying matches for Africa resume.last_img read more

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