Adding Native American history to Moreau falls short in final senate meeting

first_imgMeeting virtually for the final time before the summer break, the Notre Dame student senate made many decisions Wednesday night. Last week, the senate heard a presentation from Judicial Council president, junior Matthew Bisner over why he, many of his predecessors and many in the current student government believe the governing body to be in need of improvement. As a solution, the senate passed a resolution establishing an ad hoc committee on governmental reform.The passed resolution, drawn up by Bisner and student body vice president, junior Sarah Galbenski, said, “It is our position that an ad hoc senate committee will provide the best forum for public policymaking, maximum responsiveness to the student body and transparency throughout the entire reform process. It will also help us chart the middle ground between the formal and informal routes we have before us.” Over the summer, a preliminary committee will work toward drafting an official document mandating guidelines to the senate in the fall semester on how to move forward in making institutional changes to the student body government and/or constitution. “By the end of the fall semester or beginning of the spring semester, this committee should be prepared to deliver an advisory report to guide reforms within the Student Union,” the resolution read. Additionally, the senate started a conversation at last week’s meeting over a resolution that would formally request the incorporation of Native American culture and the University’s history with Native Americans into the Moreau First Year Experience course. After concluding the debate, the resolution did not pass, with 20 votes for and 11 votes against it. The resolution needed a 67% majority to pass and only garnered 64.5%. The main points of opposition came from: a concern over the opinion of first year students in the matter, concern over the place of Native American history in the course and concern over consulting certain University administrative offices, especially Multicultural Student Programs and Services (MSPS), about the resolution.Sophomore, Dunne senator Michael Murakami and others believed the resolution failed to garner the support of first years.“If the entire principle of this resolution is to bring a voice to those who are silenced, I think we should bring a voice to our first years before we decide to change what they are going to be going through inherently for years to come,” he said.Walsh senator Grace Franco said she is not sure the group should wait for feedback from first year students to pass the resolution.“An integral part of the Moreau First Year Experience is cultural competence, and I do think part of cultural competence is understanding Native American history on Notre Dame land,” the sophomore said. “Really heavily weighting the enthusiasm from first years may not be as important as integrating a really important part of our history.” Director of diversity and inclusion, senior Kaya Lawrence and director of academic affairs, sophomore Lauryn Pugh, who jointly drafted the resolution, intended to work with Moreau First Year Experience faculty to integrate Native American culture and history, as well as Notre Dame’s history with the Pokégnek Bodéwadmik Pokagon Band of Potawatomi tribes into the course. The exact nature of this integration would have been determined as the fall semester grew closer, according to Pugh. After the resolution failed to pass, student body president, junior Rachel Ingal, on behalf of herself, Galbenski and chief of staff, junior Aaron Benavides, expressed their disappointment in the matter in an email sent to The Observer.“Advocating for diversity and inclusion initiatives and amplifying student voices has always been at the forefront of our priorities, and we were disheartened to see that the senate could not come together to make steps towards this,” Ingal said in the email. “Educating students about how integral the Pokagon-Potawatomi are to the Notre Dame narrative and recognizing and celebrating this group is incumbent upon us. We hope that, in the future, the senate will embrace initiatives of diversity and inclusion and work to uplift every member of our community. As student leaders, we are called upon to make Notre Dame a Notre Dame for all. We will continue to move forward with bringing education and incorporation of Native culture into Moreau, and it is our goal to walk hand in hand with students toward inclusivity in the future.”Lastly, at the recommendation of Student Union treasurer, senior Grace Stephenson, the senate established an independent financial account titled the “Student Union COVID-19 Response Financial Account.” Under normal circumstances, Student Union surplus would be placed into a rollover account for the next year. However, this account has a cap of $100,000, and this year’s surplus is around $200,000. This surplus will now be placed into the COVID-19 Response account to be used and supervised by the Financial Management Board.Concern over the potential loss of revenue from The Shirt and the pending possibility of campus not resuming classes as normal in the fall prompted this order.“I think this is the best fiscal step for the Student Union,” Galbenski said. Editor’s Note: An earlier version of this story said student body president Rachel Ingal sent a statement to the senate and The Observer, but it was not sent to the senate. The Observer regrets this error. Tags: COVID-19 response, Moreau First Year Experience, Native American history, Pokagon Potawatomi, Senatelast_img read more

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Tomato pests

first_imgCaring for tomato plants can be hard work, but the taste of that first vine-ripened red tomato makes it all worthwhile. Seeing insects like hornworms and aphids devour the fruits of their labor can make home gardeners see red. University of Georgia Cooperative Extension agent Paul Pugliese offers tips for keeping the pests away.Two of the more common tomato pests are aphids and whiteflies. Both insects suck the sap out of the stems and leaves of the tomato plant, which stunts the plant and can reduce fruit yield. Aphids and whiteflies“Aphids and whiteflies can also transmit virus diseases to tomatoes,” Pugliese said. “This is another good reason to control them, since there are no sprays to cure plant viruses.”Whiteflies are tiny, yellowish insects with white wings. They can be found mostly on the undersides of tomato leaves. “If you brush your hand against the leaves of your tomato plants and see a cloud of tiny, white flying insects, then you probably have whiteflies,” he said. Aphids are commonly referred to as “plant lice,” although they are not truly lice, Pugliese said. The green peach aphid and several other species, like the potato aphid, are most commonly found on tomatoes early in the season. Aphid adults have pear-shaped bodies and are about 1/8 inch in size. Potato aphids can either be yellowish green or pink while the green peach aphid is dark green or yellow.“As aphids grow larger, they shed and leave white skin castings on the tops of leaves. This is often the first thing people notice. If you see these white specks on the leaves, be sure to turn the leaves over and look for live aphids,” he said.Honeydew isn’t a good thingTomato plants can tolerate large numbers of aphids without suffering yield loss, but may have distorted leaves and stems, stunted growth and dead spots on leaves. As a result of both aphids and whiteflies feeding on the plant, a sticky residue, known as honeydew, builds up on the leaves. If enough builds up, it can mold and turn black. This black mold is called “sooty mold.” “Because sooty mold grows on the surface of the leaves, many people think it is a disease problem. If you control the insect problem, then the sooty mold will eventually go away,” he said.Early-season aphids have many natural enemies, including lady beetles, lacewings and parasites that frequently bring them under control later in the season. Therefore, spray selection should start with the least harsh chemicals or organic options first to preserve natural enemies. Planting tolerant varieties and using sprays of natural pyrethrins, horticultural oils or insecticidal soap cause the least harm to beneficial insects and are generally sufficient early in the season, although repeat applications may be necessary. Other chemical options include products containing the active ingredient bifenthrin or malathion. Hornworms – camouflage mastersAnother common tomato pest is the hornworm, a green caterpillar with a horn on its back end. “Many people mistakenly believe the horn on the back end of this caterpillar is a stinger. The intimidating horn is purely for looks and does not actually sting,” Pugliese said. “One of the larger native caterpillars in Georgia, its mature size can be 3 to 4 inches long and as fat as your thumb.” Pugliese recommends controlling hornworms with organic insecticides containing Bacillus thuringiensis (B.t.) bacteria while the caterpillars are small. Insecticides containing carbaryl, bifenthrin or permethrin also are effective. Tilling the soil after harvest will destroy many – sometimes up to 90 percent — of the burrowing larvae that are attempting to pupate in the soil over winter, he said. Larger caterpillars can be handpicked off plants and drowned in a bucket of soapy water or stepped on. Leave parasitized worms aloneTomato hornworm larvae are often parasitized by a number of predatory insects. This is the case if you notice small, white sacks on the back of adult hornworms. “These are the cocoons of small parasitic wasps that will kill the hornworms when they emerge. If you see these white sacks, leave the hornworm in the garden to conserve these beneficial parasitoids,” he said.Pugliese discourages the use of insecticides when plants are flowering, unless it is absolutely necessary, and recommends making applications in late evening when beneficial honeybees are less active. As with all pesticides, read and follow all labeled application rates and safety precautions carefully.last_img read more

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Reporters’ Workshop prepares journalists to cover the courts

first_imgTwenty-four reporters from Florida’s major daily newspapers and television stations attended The Florida Bar’s recent 13th Annual Reporters’ Workshop in St. Petersburg.“An unprecedented partnership with the Poynter Institute allowed the journalists to attend two workshop sessions at Poynter, which were conducted by Poynter faculty members,” said the Bar’s Christi N. Cao, who coordinated the event.“The Poynter Institute is recognized worldwide for helping journalists seek and achieve excellence,” she said.“The Florida Bar deeply appreciates the contributions of Poynter,” said President Tod Aronovitz, who gave opening remarks at the event. “The true beneficiaries are the people of Florida who read and listen to news reports, expecting accurate and complete coverage of legal issues.”The Reporters’ Workshop is a two-day program designed for journalists new to the courts and legal beats. This year the event was co-chaired by Judith Mercier and Rachel Fugate. The Florida Bar Media & Communications Law Committee, media outlets, and law firms also provided scholarships for selected reporters to attend the workshop.Reporters received training from lawyers, judges, and other experienced journalists, and workshop sessions this year included Sunshine Law and Public Records, Reporting With the Internet – Legal and Courts Beats, and How to Stay Out of Jail.Cao said the program consistently receives high ratings by participating journalists, and this year was no exception.“One participant said the workshop ‘revitalized my energy in the biz’ and another summed it up as ‘jam-packed and extremely valuable,’” Cao said.Attending the workshop were: Trevor Aaronson, Weekly Planet, Tampa; Jenny Allen, Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Port Charlotte; Jeff Burlew, Tallahassee Democrat, Tallahassee; Anthony Colarossi, The Orlando Sentinel, Orlando; Laurie Cunningham, Daily Business Review, Miami; Lisa A. Davis, The Tampa Tribune, Tampa; Steve Ellman, Daily Business Review, West Palm Beach; Henry Frederick, The Daytona Beach News-Journal, Daytona Beach; Alan Gomez, Pensacola News Journal, Pensacola; Lesley Hendrix, WMBB-TV (ABC), Panama City; Jamie Holmes, WPTV-TV (NBC), West Palm Beach; Tom Kim, Sarasota Herald-Tribune, Bradenton; Marcy Levinson, The Daily Commercial, Leesburg; Brian Monroe, Florida Today, Melbourne; Shannon O’Boye, South Florida Sun-Sentinel, Ft. Lauderdale; Mark Pollio, Ft. Pierce Tribune, Ft. Pierce; Eric Roby, WPEC-TV (CBS), West Palm Beach; Candace Rondeaux, St. Petersburg Times, St. Petersburg; Jeff Scullin, The Ledger, Lakeland; Irina Slutsky, Bradenton Herald, Bradenton; Heather Sorentrue, WUFT-TV (PBS), Gainesville; Sharon Turco, The News-Press, Ft. Myers; Lance Williams, WFLA-TV (NBC), Tampa; and Eileen Zaffiro, The Daytona Beach News-Journal, Daytona Beach. January 1, 2003 Regular News Reporters’ Workshop prepares journalists to cover the courtscenter_img Reporters’ Workshop prepares journalists to cover the courtslast_img read more

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Wolf Administration Adds New Programs to Assist Job Seekers with Target Training Opportunities

first_imgElectro Soft, Inc. – Electro Soft Inc., a 30-year veteran in electronics contract manufacturing, specializes in cable assembly, box build assembly, wire harness assembly and printed circuit board assembly. The company registered a program for industrial manufacturing technicians. TLC Construction Co. – TLC Construction registered an apprenticeship program in construction. The company emphasizes hiring ex-offenders and others from underprivileged communities. TLC Work-Based Training, the associated non-profit organization, helps ex-offenders get credentialed training and partners with supportive services to help reduce recidivism.Approved through the Department of Labor & Industry’s Apprenticeship and Training Office, apprenticeship programs are used to provide employer-driven training to create a more productive, diverse, highly skilled workforce for employers and help reduce employee turnover. The program provides job seekers with increased skills, and a nationally recognized credential to support future career advancement and increased wages.For more information on the Apprenticeship and Training Office, visit ATO. Greiner Packaging, Inc. – Greiner Packaging Inc., which manufactures plastic cups, registered its existing non-registered apprenticeship training program. Students earn two-year associate degrees as part of the apprenticeship program. June 14, 2017 Detroit Switch, Inc. – Detroit Switch manufactures high-pressure, high-shock switches for the Navy and heavy manufacturers. Detroit Switch is a small company, and registered an apprenticeship program as a pathway for a current employee to train to be a machinist. Wolf Administration Adds New Programs to Assist Job Seekers with Target Training Opportunitiescenter_img Economy,  Jobs That Pay,  Press Release,  Workforce Development Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf announced that the Department of Labor & Industry’s Apprenticeship and Training Office (ATO) approved the addition of five new apprenticeship programs and two new apprenticeship occupations to help employers train the workers they need and assist job seekers in establishing a career pathways that lead to jobs that pay.“The apprenticeship programs approved today give job seekers a competitive edge by providing them with practical, hands-on job experience,” Governor Wolf said. “And, the programs benefit employers by providing targeted training opportunities in the industries and occupations needed to address regional employment needs.”The Wolf Administration established the ATO last year to be responsible for providing outreach, education, and technical support to current and prospective apprenticeship program sponsors and apprentices. To date, the ATO has added 1,714 new apprentices and 66 new registered apprenticeship occupations statewide.“Apprenticeships provide job seekers with a unique opportunity to earn while they learn,” said Department of Labor & Industry Secretary Kathy Manderino.  “Apprenticeships are a combination of classroom learning and on-the-job training that can lead to stackable, industry-recognized credentials.”Following is a list of recently approved apprenticeship programs:Bryn Mawr College –The college added an HVAC and plumbing trade to its existing apprenticeship training program in Bryn Mawr. Philadelphia-Delaware Valley NTMA Chapter – Philadelphia-Delaware Valley NTMA Chapter added an industrial maintenance trade to its existing machinist training program. Curtis Industries – Curtis Industries registered a machinist program. The company works to hire students from local career and technical education programs. SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Indiana Legislative Session Starts Tuesday

first_imgState Rep. Randy Frye (R-Greensburg) will be in Indianapolis Tuesday.Local lawmakers will return to the Statehouse Tuesday for Organization Day, a one-day event prior to the start of the January 2013 legislative session.State Representative Randy Frye (R-Greensburg) indicated that no legislation will take place Tuesday.“It is mostly ceremonial, but it is an important part of getting started,” said Representative Frye. “Organization Day is a time when any changes in committee assignments will be made, and {The Speaker of the House Brian Bosma] will give a speech where he will outline his plans for the upcoming legislative session.”Frye will be among 100 representatives and 50 senators for the 2014 legislative session.“I have several bills drafted for the 2014 legislation,” Representative Frye explained.Soil productivity factors are a rating system used to compare the productive potential of one soil type to the other for property tax purposes. Frye hopes to pass legislation in 2014 that requires legislative approval prior to soil productivity factor changing.“That way, those elected to represent the people, are responsible for any increase or decrease in their taxes,” Frye said.The 1973 Batesville High School graduate will continue listening to citizens in his district.“They can count on me on paying close attention and reaching out to the citizens of House District 67.”The 2014 legislative session could potentially cover the proposal to alter Indiana’s gay marriage ban and reconsideration of state educational standards.House District 67 represents residents of Dearborn, Decatur, Ripley, Jennings, Jefferson and Switzerland counties.last_img read more

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Friday Night Lights

first_imgThis is the time of year when high schools are having their Homecoming football games. Even when a team is not winning, Homecoming is still a big deal. It excites the students as well as that school’s alums.  I bet most of you still know who your high school Homecoming queen was.  The smaller the community, the bigger Friday night football games are.  It is the town’s gathering place during the fall.Right now the Oldenburg Academy football program is struggling with numbers.  There are several reasons for this, but the biggest one is the lack of home facilities.  It is hard for the student body to get really excited when all of your Friday night football games are away.  A Homecoming for them has to be at someone else’s facility which may be many miles from Oldenburg.  It is hard to have a parade and build floats in someone else’s city.last_img read more

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Marcella Heilig

first_imgMarcella A. Heilig, 92, of Aurora, Indiana, passed away July 5, 2017 in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.She was born November 12, 1924 in Lawrenceburg, IN, daughter of the late Harry H Liddle and Garnetta Liddle.She worked as a Secretary for Stedman’s Foundry and also as a teller at the American State Bank.She enjoyed knitting, crocheting, was an avid reader and an excellent cook. She also has a huge Star Trek collection, she was a real Trekkie.Surviving are step children, Margo Heilig Jolly of Salem, IN, Dan Heilig of Denver, CO, Ron Heilig of Lexington, KY, Danny Lyons of Aurora, IN, Teresa Bockhorst of Dillsboro, IN; Niece, Roseann Sharp of Phoenix, AZ; Sister, Rosemary Vorbroker of Aurora, IN; several step grandchildren, great grandchldren nieces and nephews.She was preceded in death by her parents Harry and Garnetta Liddle; her sister, Gloria Trudeau; her husbands, Jack Lillich, Bill Lyons and Marvin Heilig.Friends will be received Monday, July 10, 2017, 10:00 am – 12:00 pm at the St. Mary’s Catholic Church, 203 Fourth Street, Aurora, Indiana. Tri Kappa Services will be held at 11:00 a.m.Mass of Christian Burial will be held at the Church, at 12:00 pm with Father Chris Craig officiating.Interment will follow in the River View Cemetery, Aurora, Indiana.Contributions may be made to the St. Mary’s Catholic Church or Aurora Life Squad. If unable to attend services, please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

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O’Connell: Competition is strong

first_img Ireland lock O’Connell, who is on his third Lions tour, is widely expected to forge the Test second-row partnership alongside Welshman Alun-Wyn Jones. But the 33-year-old is taking nothing for granted ahead of what should be his seventh Test match appearance in Lions colours. “There is savage competition for places, and guys are very eager to play as well as they can individually,” said O’Connell, who was part of the 2005 squad whitewashed by New Zealand and then captained the Lions in South Africa four years ago. Press Association Paul O’Connell believes there is “savage competition” for places in the British and Irish Lions squad as the countdown continues towards next Saturday’s first Test against Australia.center_img “I think if you look at the back-line and the way the backs have been playing it’s certainly a step up. Forwards-wise, I think we’ve performed really well as well. We’ve carried well, done well at the breakdown at times and it’s as good as any team I’ve been on, but you don’t really know until you get to the Tests.” The Lions will chase a sixth successive tour win against the Brumbies on Tuesday, having so far amassed 261 points and 33 tries Down Under. It is form that has seen them installed as Test series favourites by many pundits. But O’Connell knows Australia will be fierce opponents, adding: “We’ve a very tough three weeks ahead of us. Australia are a really good side, they have a lot of incredibly talented players and the next three weeks will be really tough and will be a lot different to what we’ve experienced (so far) in terms of intensity and physicality. It will be a big step up for us.” Meanwhile, Lions team doctor James Robson has delivered contrasting medical updates on Wales backs Jamie Roberts and George North ahead of next Saturday’s first Test match appointment with Australia in Brisbane. Centre Roberts limped off during Saturday’s 47-17 victory against the New South Wales Waratahs, suffering a hamstring strain. “Jamie is a grave doubt for this weekend, there is no doubt about that,” Robson said. “You only had to see how much discomfort he was in at the weekend. However, further assessment will be made later in the week as to his availability going forward.” Wing North, though, is well on the way back following a hamstring problem. Robson added: “He (North) is an exceptional character and has worked really hard. He is back to running today. An accurate assessment on his availability for selection will take place on Wednesday. At the moment, I think he is doing very well and has a great chance of being fit for this week.” last_img read more

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Beaux out to be Curragh beauty

first_img Press Association The Jessica Harrington-trained filly has raced against colts in the first two starts of her career, but takes on her own sex this weekend. Having narrowly failed on her debut at Tipperary she was a gutsy winner at Dundalk, beating Aidan O’Brien’s General Marshall. Lola Beaux steps into Group class for the first time in Sunday’s CL & MF Weld Park Stakes at the Curragh.center_img A daughter of Equiano, she is owned by Hayley O’Connor, who works as a PR representative for Ladbrokes. Harrington said: “I’ve been very happy with her since Dundalk. She was only just touched off on her first start and then I was delighted with her next time. “Both her runs have been against colts, but she’s very tough and hardy and has a professional attitude. I’m hoping she’ll run well.” Willie McCreery is gunning for more big-race glory, this time with Queen Anne, a Sheikh Mohammed-owned daughter of Iffraaj who on pedigree should be suited by stepping up to seven furlongs. Aidan O’Brien’s Qualify is joined by stablemate Ask Me Nicely, while Dermot Weld’s Stormfly returns after a break. Andy Oliver saddles Galway winner Could Should Would, and the once-raced Stellar Glow of Jim Bolger’s bids to step up on a promising first effort behind Tamadhor at Leopardstown on Irish Champions Weekend. last_img read more

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Dawson delivers before India make good to reply England’s 477

first_img(REUTERS)-India made a strong reply to England’s first-innings total of 477 after half-centuries by debutant Liam Dawson and number nine Adil Rashid underlined the tourists’ batting depth in the fifth and final Test yesterday.India claimed three wickets on the second morning but the 108-run partnership between Dawson and Rashid in a productive second session for the touring side frustrated the hosts.India’s Murali Vijay hurt his shoulder while fielding and could not come out to bat but the makeshift opening pair of Lokesh Rahul and Parthiv Patel did a decent job, adding 60 runs without being separated.Rahul was unbeaten on 30 at stumps and the right-hander will be eager to make amends with the bat having dropped centurion Moeen Ali before he had scored on Friday.Patel was on 29 at the other end with India, who have an unassailable 3-0 lead in the series, 417 runs behind on a pitch which has grown easier to bat on.Earlier, resuming on 284-4, England got an early jolt when Ravichandran Ashwin struck with the day’s fifth delivery at the MA Chidambaram Stadium.The leading wicket-taker in the series had endured a rare wicketless day on Friday but he lured Ben Stokes on to the front foot to edge a fuller delivery which Parthiv Patel caught behind the stumps.Paceman Ishant Sharma trapped Jos Buttler lbw for five while Moeen, who resumed on 120, looked ill at ease against the short-pitched deliveries.The left-hander virtually walked into a trap when Umesh Yadav forced him into playing a pull shot, which the batsman mistimed to find Ravindra Jadeja at deep mid-wicket.Moeen faced 262 balls for his 146, hitting 13 fours and a six.Dawson endured a tough Test initiation, the second ball he faced from Sharma smacking him on his helmet but the 26-year-old grew in confidence as he and Rashid shared the second century-plus stand of the English innings.Rashid hit eight fours before edging Yadav to Patel for 60.Dawson was stranded on 66 not out, including five fours and a six, when Amit Mishra bowled Jake Ball with a googly.ENGLAND 1st innings (Overnight: 284-4)A. Cook c Kohli b Jadeja 10K. Jennings c P. Patel b I. Sharma 1J. Root c P. Patel b Jadeja 88M. Ali c Jadeja b U. Yadav 146J. Bairstow c Rahul b Jadeja 49B. Stokes c P. Patel b R. Ashwin 6J. Buttler lbw b I. Sharma 5L. Dawson not out 66A. Rashid c P. Patel b U. Yadav 60S. Broad run out (Rahul, P. Patel) 19J. Ball b Mishra 12Extras (b-4 lb-5 w-1 pen-5) 15Total (all out, 157.2 overs) 477Fall of wickets: 1-7 K. Jennings,2-21 A. Cook,3-167 J. Root,4-253 J. Bairstow,5-287 B. Stokes,6-300 J. Buttler,7-321 M. Ali,8-429 A. Rashid,9-455 S. Broad,10-477 J. BallBowling: U. Yadav 21 – 3 – 73 – 2(w-1),I. Sharma 21 – 6 – 42 – 2,R. Jadeja 45 – 9 – 106 – 3, R. Ashwin 44 – 3 – 151 – 1,A. Mishra 25.2 – 5 – 87 – 1,K. Nair 1 – 0 – 4 – 0.INDIA 1st inningsL. Rahul not out 30P. Patel not out 28Extras (lb-2) 2Total (for no loss, 20 overs) 60Fall of wickets:To bat: M. Vijay, C. Pujara, V. Kohli, K. Nair, R. Ashwin, R. Jadeja, A. Mishra, I. Sharma, U. YadavBowling: S. Broad 5 – 2 – 6 – 0,J. Ball 3 – 0 – 9 – 0, M. Ali 7 – 1 – 18 – 0, B. Stokes 2 – 0 – 12 – 0,A. Rashid 2 – 0 – 13 – 0L. Dawson 1 – 0 – 0 – 0.last_img read more

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