NASCAR at Phoenix results: Denny Hamlin survives late caution flag to secure Championship 4 spot

first_imgDenny Hamlin entered the Bluegreen Vacations 500 in need of a clutch performance to sneak his way into the Championship 4 field. He delivered in a big way, leading 143 laps en route to a victory at ISM Raceway outside Phoenix.Hamlin and Kyle Busch, the Joe Gibbs duo who finished 1-2 on Sunday, will join Kevin Harvick and Martin Truex Jr. in next week’s season finale at Homestead-Miami Speedway. Ryan Blaney (third), Kyle Larson (fourth), Joey Logano (ninth) and Chase Elliott (39th) were the four drivers eliminated. 2:51 p.m.: Kyle Busch has yet to relinquish the lead after 12 laps and Hamlin has moved up to second (now 17 points off the cut line).2:47 p.m. Green flag.NASCAR championship standings 2019Pos.DriverPoints+/-1.Martin Truex Jr. (clinched)4,133-2.Kevin Harvick (clinched)4,113-3.Kyle Busch4,113+224.Joey Logano4,111+20Cut-off line5.Denny Hamlin4,091-206.Ryan Blaney4,088-237.Kyle Larson4,088-238.Chase Elliott4,033-78Here is the complete breakdown of clinching scenarios for Sunday’s race. MORE: Championship 4 info, driver thumbnailsIt appeared for the majority of the afternoon that Hamlin would cruise to the checkered flag. His No. 11 car pushed the lead to over 10 seconds and nipped a number of drivers off the lead lap in a dominating Stage 3.A late caution caused plenty of drama in the final laps, though. John Hunter Nemecheck, who finished 27th, went into the wall and brought out a yellow flag with just eight laps to go, erasing Hamlin’s comfortable lead. Hamlin was visibly upset when he noticed the flag come out, banging his hand against the steering wheel in frustration.In championship-like fashion, however, Hamlin responded. He held off challenges by both Busch and Ryan Blaney on a chaotic restart and captured the checkered flag three laps later.Sporting News tracked live race updates and lap-by-lap highlights from NASCAR’s Cup Series semifinal on Sunday.Bluegreen Vacations 500: 2019 winner, top-20 order of finishFinishDriverTeam (Car No.)Laps Led1Denny HamlinJoe Gibbs Racing (11)1432Kyle BuschJoe Gibbs Racing (18)703Ryan BlaneyPenske Racing (4)04Kyle LarsonChip Ganassi Racing (42)05Kevin HarvickStewart-Haas Racing (4)36Martin Truex Jr.Tommy Baldwin Racing (19)07Erik JonesJoe Gibbs Racing (20)08Clint BowyerStewart-Haas Racing (14)09Joey LoganoPenske Racing (22)9310Brad KeselowskiPenske Racing (2)311Kurt BuschChip Ganassi Racing (1)412Paul MenardWood Brothers (21)013Matt DiBenedettoBK Racing (95)014Jimmie JohnsonHendrick Motorsports (48)015Daniel SuarezStewart-Haas Racing (41)016Chris BuescherJTG Daugherty (37)017William ByronHendrick Motorsports (24)018Ryan NewmanRoush Fenway Racing (6)019Ricky Stenhouse Jr.Roush Fenway Racing (17)020Ty DillonRichard Childress Racing (13)0NASCAR at Phoenix live race updates, highlights5:34 p.m.: CHECKERED FLAG. Hamlin wins. It will be Harvick, Truex, Hamlin and Kyle Busch in the Championship 4. Denny Hamlin WINS his way to the #Championship4!This winning moment at Phoenix is presented by @ToyotaRacing! pic.twitter.com/zKJwYvIFVz— NASCAR on NBC (@NASCARonNBC) November 10, 20195:32 p.m.: Green flag is back in the air as Hamlin and Blaney are 1-2, both in must-win situations.5:27 p.m.: CAUTION. John Hunter Nemecheck hits the wall and the yellow flag is out with just nine laps remaining. The flag negates Hamlin’s massive lead and they will have to line it up again. Hamlin needs to win to make the Championship 4. Leaders are in for a pit.5:22 p.m.: Hamlin’s lead remains steady over the rest of the field with 20 laps to go. 5:06 p.m.: The top three drivers remain unchanged after pits: Hamlin, Kyle Busch and Blaney.4:59 p.m.: The leaders are beginning to come in for pit stops under green flag with 67 laps remaining. Here come potentially #Championship4-deciding green flag pit stops!Don’t miss any of the action!📺: NBC📱: https://t.co/sYpRYwvSwz pic.twitter.com/6GiaO9yIgY— NASCAR (@NASCAR) November 10, 20194:56 p.m.: Hamlin puts Logano a lap down on Lap 239. 4:53 p.m.: Hamlin’s lead over Kyle Busch is now 10 seconds. Logano has fallen to 12th and is the final car on the lead lap. 4:47 p.m.: Logano has slipped all the way to seventh. Hamlin, Kyle Busch and Ryan Blaney is the top three.4:40 p.m.: Hamlin’s lead is now over four seconds over Kyle Busch, who is three seconds ahead of Logano.4:31 p.m.: Kyle Busch is now battling Logano for the second position. Just a point between those two drivers separates the Champion 4 cut line.4:28 p.m.: Hamlin snags the lead from Logano on Lap 177. 4:26 p.m.: Logano, Hamlin and Kyle Busch lead the field back on the green flag.4:18 p.m.: CAUTION. Elliott goes hard into the wall after likely having a tire go down. That will end his 2019 championship hopes.It’s over for Chase Elliott.#NASCARPlayoffs // #Championship4 pic.twitter.com/LBxQfcyBxa— NASCAR on NBC (@NASCARonNBC) November 10, 20194:14 p.m.: Green flag.4:04 p.m.: Logano wins Stage 2.4:03 p.m.: Hamlin and Elliott are engaged in a multi-lap battle for second. Neither driver is gaining the upper edge.”SLIDE JOB!”@DaleJr calls Denny Hamlin’s pass on Chase Elliott for second place in Stage 2. Joey Logano wins. Watch the finish on @NBC! #NASCARPlayoffs pic.twitter.com/Jq7NUfDMyK— NASCAR on NBC (@NASCARonNBC) November 10, 20193:55 p.m.: Elliott is closing in on Logano. His lead is now just half of a second.3:44 p.m.: Logano’s lead has ballooned to over three seconds now as we reach Lap 110. 3:38 p.m.: Elliott mentions on his team radio that he is having a power-steering issue. He still remains in second, 2.5 seconds behind Logano.”Have your power steering stuff ready. Something feels weird.”Cause for concern for the @Hendrick9Team of @ChaseElliott. #NASCARPlayoffs pic.twitter.com/TaEIWKtM5W— NASCAR on NBC (@NASCARonNBC) November 10, 20193:34 p.m.: Logano takes the lead with Elliott behind him in second.3:33 p.m.: Green flag is back out as Stage 2 is underway.3:25 p.m.: Hamlin wins Stage 1.Denny Hamlin wins Stage 1 and gets 10 stage points. Then it’s Chase Elliott, KyBusch, Joey Logano, Kyle Larson, Keselowski, Blaney, Byron, Harvick, KuBusch.— Jeff Gluck (@jeff_gluck) November 10, 20193:20 p.m.: Keselowski takes the green flag on the restart following the pit stops. Hamlin quickly surges to take over the top spot.3:18 p.m.: CAUTION. The first caution flag of the day is out on Lap 67 as Ricky Stenhouse makes contact with the wall in Turn 4. The leaders will come in to pit. The leaders hit pit road with a sprint to the end of Stage 1 on deck!Get to NBC to see which #NASCARPlayoffs drivers can get crucial stage points! pic.twitter.com/aXm94EcQfL— NASCAR (@NASCAR) November 10, 20193:09 p.m.: There are 22 cars on the lead lap as Busch remains in first through the first 50 laps. 2:58 p.m.: Busch’s lead over Hamlin is nearly 1.5 seconds as each of the eight playoff drivers are within the top 10.last_img read more

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4 hospitals receive $2M equipment donation

first_imgRepresentatives from the various hospitals receiving the donationsThe Georgetown Public Hospital Corporation (GPHC); Linden Hospital Complex (LHC); New Amsterdam Hospital and Suddie Hospital on Wednesday were the recipients of a $2 million donation, which will see the improvement of visual presentations to educate the public.The four hospitals were each presented with one 55-inch television, a DVD player, DVD recordings and wall mounts, which were donated by Dr Lorna Amsterdam. It was related that Dr Amsterdam has been donating equipment to a number of hospitals for just over a year.According to the representatives from the hospitals, the televisions will be placed in the waiting areas to educate patients on various health issues, while some would be placed in the ophthalmology department to bring awareness on the different optical conditions.The ceremony was attended by Public Health Minister Volda Lawrence, who noted in her remarks, “This is what we’re talking about, giving back to the community. They’re giving back in a very healthy way, because these instruments will be used to bring about awareness of various health issues and also to teach our patients some of the dos and don’ts in terms of keeping their bodies healthy and also keeping their families healthy.“It is all-encompassing with what the Ministry’s vision is; trying to ensure that we take health to the people and we want to express our sincere appreciation for these instruments,” she added.She also highlighted that the hospitals who are recipients of the equipment should value the contributions that were made and recognise that this addition would add value to the service which they are expected to provide to the public.The idea behind these contributions is to reach out to Guyanese and educate them on a disease that they may have or the guidelines that are necessary to prevent such diseases.last_img read more

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Lessons for Scaling Your Business from Uber

first_imgIn the second post in our two-part interview with Uber’s Ryan Graves (read Part I here) the VP of Operations talks about the biggest hurdles the venture-backed on-demand car service has overcome during its path to growth.biggest hurdles to scaling a businessWhen Ryan Graves helped found what was then called UberCab in 2010, he wasn’t exactly thinking about scaling a business. As the San Francisco-based startup’s CEO, Graves simply wanted to get the company off the ground and operational.In two short years, however, that mindset has changed. Last December, the on-demand car service closed a $39 million Series B round of financing, led by a who’s who of investors, including Menlo Ventures, Amazon’s Jeff Bezos, and Goldman Sachs. Today, Uber has a presence in — or will soon be launching in — 20 cities and four different countries, with big plans for further widespread expansion.While all of that might make it sound like Uber’s growth has been a smooth, bump-free ride, Graves says that’s not exactly the case. He recently sat down with OpenView to talk about the challenges he has faced scaling a business that hasn’t always been warmly received in new markets, and what he has enjoyed the most about the entire process.“If we hadn’t managed that attention appropriately, it would have been easy to lose focus, and deviated from the path we knew made the most sense for the business.”What has been the most difficult part about scaling a business like Uber?I think we’ve dealt with some pretty unique regulatory issues in a couple of the domestic markets we’ve expanded into. Most technology companies don’t have to worry about that kind of thing until they begin expanding internationally.So for us to be successful in new markets, we’ve had to plan for those issues, navigate them, understand the market dynamics, and find ways to maneuver our strategy to adapt to those environments. It wasn’t always easy, but at the same time it forced us to think a little bit more strategically about our expansion, which has been good for the company.The other challenge for us was hype management. I know that’s a very fortunate problem to have, but it did present some unique challenges, particularly when it came to financing. We had more press than we knew what to do with and we had a lot of different investors knocking on our door.If we hadn’t managed that attention appropriately, it would have been easy to lose focus, and deviated from the path we knew made the most sense for the business.Uber’s now gone through three rounds of financing. What have you learned from those experiences?I think the terms of the deal are probably the most important thing to consider. Most of the value that venture capitalists bring to the table is their money, so you need to make sure that the terms you’re offered align with your short- and long-term goals.From there, you should definitely look at the auxiliary value that specific VC firms can offer, because that can be the differentiator between two offers with similar terms.I think most of that auxiliary value stems from the people who you’ll be partnering with. Are they positive? Do they share the same goals for the business that you do? Are they hands-on or hands-off?All of those factors matter and they can definitely impact the relationship you have with your investors. If that relationship isn’t a good one then scaling a business will definitely be more difficult.When scaling a business, many founders can struggle with recruiting and developing their teams. How has Uber managed to avoid that roadblock so far?Recruiting is the most challenging thing we face in our effort to scale Uber. Because the process of growth is such a time-sensitive process, you can’t afford to recruit the wrong types of people. If you do, they’ll ultimately drag you and your business down with them.As for more explicit advice, there are two things I think companies need to keep in mind. First, be patient when you’re recruiting team members. If you hold out an extra week or month for the right person — rather than hiring the first candidate you interview just to fill a seat — that patience will pay off. Don’t lower your quality bar.Second, act swiftly with team members who aren’t working out. I know that goes against my previous point about patience, but I think the adage “hire slow, fire fast” absolutely applies.Once you’ve assembled a team, how do you develop a culture that keeps everyone focused, motivated, and excited to work for the company?That’s an interesting question. I think culture is critical, but I also think that focusing on it too much can make you seem insincere.If you’re saying to your team, “Hey guys, this is our culture and this is what we need to care about,” I don’t think it’s going to resonate. That’s kind of lame. I’ve made this mistake.Culture isn’t something that you force feed your team. It’s more of a byproduct of who you are collectively, what you stand for, and what you value most. If you focus on people individually — the work that they do and the way in which they’re rewarded — I think that will have a far greater impact on your business, and culture will take care of itself.In short, your culture should be the sum of everything you do, not some slogan you put on a banner and hang in your office.Read Part I of our interview with Ryan here. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to PrintPrintShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThislast_img read more

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