DPP recommends rape charges for City Constable

first_imgCity Hall alleged cover-upThe Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) has recommended that charges be brought against City Constable Clifton Pellew for the alleged rape of a minor, who was in his care at the City Constabulary last year.After much public pressure, City Hall turned the matter over to the Police, who following an investigation, sought advice from the DPP on the matter.This publication was reliably informed on Tuesday that the file has been returned to the Police with instructions that the charge be instituted.City Constable Clifton PellewThe incident allegedly occurred when a 15-year-old boy was taken into custody on August 17, 2017 for wandering. At some point during his detention, the minor was reportedly transferred to the Regent Street, Georgetown Outpost, where the alleged incident occurred between August 22 and 23.It was only after allegations made its way into the public domain that City Hall acted on the matter. In the aftermath of the allegation, Pellew and another officer, Corporal Quacy Baveghems, were sacked by authorities. It was at this point that the name of the accused found itself in the public domain.The Local Government Commission (LGC) is also expected to launch a probe into the allegation. Town Clerk Royston King had announced that following the receipt of legal advice, it was decided to forward the matter to the LGC.For its part, LGC Chairman Mortimer Mingo was quoted in sections of the press committing to investigating the matter as soon as possible. It is unclear at present if the Commission is ensconced in an office of its own. Previously, it had met in Parliament Buildings in order to conduct its affairs.ProtestsNot satisfied with the mere sacking of two officers, protesters have been holding impromptu demonstrations in front of City Hall. There have been accusations that authorities have been trying to cover up the issue. This is something that City Hall has denied.CulpableWhile commending the DPP for recommending rape charges, noted child rights activist Nicole Cole stated that the matter did not end there. When contacted by Guyana Times, the Rights of the Child Commissioner, the Child Protection Act applies to persons who knowingly do not report child abuse to the rightful authorities.“I applaud the DPP for recommending the rape charge against the perpetrator because the crime of rape is Guyana has become normalised simply because in many instances justice is extremely slow. Rape of a child or children is a very serious offence in every society,” she related.“The Child Protection Act of 2009 applies here. That Act clearly outlines that all citizens have to report the rape of a child and failure to do so is guilt (by) conspiracy,” the activist said.last_img read more

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First Nations and Corporate CSR In Need of Shared Assumptions

first_imgShareTweetShareEmail0 SharesJune 12, 2014; Beacon NewsWe have noted an increase recently in discussions critical of top-down approaches to social improvement, both in the United States and internationally. In that vein, we found this article especially clear about the reasons why. In Calgary, the Impact Society is designed to help corporations create working relationships with First Nations that are based on a different set of assumptions than those the corporations currently hold.The group’s CEO, Jack Toth, says that First Nations leaders are tired of “companies [that start] with an assumption of community dysfunction.”“Successful relationships start with a fair assessment of both partners’ strengths and needs. By focusing on strengths, both parties have the potential to multiply those strengths and close gaps,” says Toth. “This process teaches each side to listen to the other, leading to trusting relationships, social change, and economic growth.”Toth believes that companies tend to see themselves as strong, with few weaknesses, and that their assumptions, far from true, lead most corporations to wrongly take a transactional approach toward First Nations relationships.“First Nations insist on being consulted well before project or community investment planning even begins. They need to be the ones who are met with first,” Toth says. “Sit down to understand their perspectives and needs and build those perspectives in from the start. Don’t come to them and say, ‘This is what’s going to happen, what do you think?’”Toth notes, “Although dysfunction does exist, within the communities are also many strengths. When we focus on assessing community strengths as a starting point, we get a very positive response. And when we focus on strengths, we increase resilience, and reduce dysfunction.”Joni Avram, writing for Beacon News, observes, “At a time when access to international markets remains the sector’s biggest problem, and the eyes of the world focus on how Canada relates to its First Nations peoples, replacing a still largely one-sided, outdated approach to Corporate Social Responsibility with one focused on mutual respect and shared value offers a unique opportunity to earn not only the social license to operate, but enormous economic and social returns—and the trust and respect of an increasingly skeptical public.”—Ruth McCambridgeShareTweetShareEmail0 Shareslast_img read more

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