“Demand your rights” – Minister Harmon tells Kildonan residents

first_imgResidents of Kildonan, Region Six (East Berbice-Corentyne) and its surrounding communities were on Tuesday urged by Minister of State Joseph Harmon to hold public officials inclusive of those in Regional and Neighbourhood Democratic Councils (RDC/NDCs) accountable, as he noted that they have been placed there to serve the citizens. He reiterated that they must therefore demand that their interests and those of the community are addressed.The Minister, while speaking at a community meeting held at the Kildonan Community Centre Ground, addressed the concerns that were raised by residents as it relates to poor utility services that are being offered.The Minister called on residents to hold their regional officials accountable just as they do Central Government and admonished the regional leaders to work toMinister of State Joseph Harmon during his address to residentsensure the interests of their constituents are properly represented.“You have to put pressure on these people, on the NDC, on the RDC because when funds are allocated, it is for them to provide a service for you citizens. If you know money has been allocated in the budget for works in your community and you do not see anything happening, there is a provision in the clause of NDCs, which states that you can go and petition the NDC,” he said to the residents.His advice to the regional officials was, “Community leaders must face the community. If you cannot talk to your people and do things for them then they will not respect you or listen to you. You have to see people and see what they need,” he said.During the meeting, Marvin Duncan, a resident who lost his home recently to a fire, was informed by Minister Harmon that 10 tonnes of sand as well as 500 concrete blocks will be provided to aid his rebuilding efforts.Hazrat Hussain, also a resident of the region, noted that the residents of East Bank Berbice are happy and grateful for the works that have been taking place in that area, particularly the road works.The Public Infrastructure Ministry has undertaken the $1.2 billion project, which will see the construction of a five kilometres roadway from Overwinning to Everton, equipped with new features aimed at bolstering road safety. The road, which was deplorable in the dry weather, is now impassable in the rainy season.last_img read more

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‘Big Break’ offers bigger lesson

first_img 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Tommy Armour won a British Open there. So did Henry Cotton, Ben Hogan, Gary Player, Tom Watson and Paul Lawrie. Can area teaching pro Paul Holtby also claim victory at Carnoustie, Scotland? Holtby, the Southern California PGA Section Player of the Year in 1998, can’t say. It’s part of his agreement with The Golf Channel’s “The Big Break IV,” which matched 12 players – six Americans and six Europeans – in a Ryder Cup-style competition filmed in June at the famed Scottish course and scheduled to run as a 14-week television series beginning Sept. 13. Holtby, a Moorpark resident and touring and teaching professional who instructs at Tom Barber Golf Center in Moorpark, won’t soon forget his introduction to show business, filming his big break on one of the world’s most difficult golf courses. Committed passionately to preparation, the 38-year-old Simi Valley High product discovered early there could be almost no preparation for this – the fourth installment of “The Big Break” series. There were mostly long days and long waits – something the fiercely goal-oriented Holtby learned in one of his early attempts at preparation: “I spoke with an actor, one of my students, before I left and asked him, ‘What do I do to prepare for this?’ He told me actors get paid to wait, and then they do a little acting.” Holtby learned to relate to that, big time. “We were there filming for two weeks,” he said. “The average day, we’d have 4:30-5 a.m. breakfast, then they’d do the opening of the show, which took a couple of hours. Then we’d go to the range for 20 minutes, and they’d tell us what area of the game to work on. Then we’d drive out to the hole where they set up the cameras, wait for an hour and a half, then hit a few shots or do whatever the challenge was. “It ended up probably being 12-hour average film days,” Holtby continued. “Then, we’d come back in and, after dinner, do 2“-hour interviews every day on that day’s activities. So it really ended up being 15- to 16-hour days for 14 days straight. “It was not fun,” Holtby said. “It was exhausting physically and mentally. For me, it was really challenging, because you couldn’t prepare, and I’m very goal-oriented. I set goals. I set plans. I try to plan everything out. And I’m stuck in a foreign country in a hotel I can’t leave, and I’ve got, in essence, to wait to be told what to be doing – and then you only get a 15- (to) 20-minute window of what you’re going to be doing. It was a very, very tough difference for me.” Which is why Holtby was so surprised that, after returning home and essentially collapsing – “I was absolutely down for eight days” – he found himself looking back at the experience as one of the most unforgettable and meaningful of his life. Not because of the competition, which he always has loved and which he said was at its highest level for this fourth edition of the show. The contestants on this “Big Break” were exclusively golf professionals – all six of the Europeans are touring pros. Not because of the glamour of show business: After putting in those 16-hour days, often waiting and watching as 25 cameras were maneuvered to the right angle for any shot, the contestants got to go back to their hotel rooms, where they were allowed no television and no phone calls. What Holtby found most meaningful about the experience was how all that isolation and the lack of an opportunity to prepare made him realize how much his forward-looking had controlled his life. “Going for two weeks with no (self-)organization or planning, no goals, no structure,” he said, “made me realize how structured my life was and how I don’t live in the present. “I was always two days ahead, a week ahead, four weeks ahead. Filming this show made me realize I’m 38 years old, I’d better start enjoying what I’m doing and how wonderful I have it. I realized I need to start focusing and stay more in the present.” In other words, the same things he preaches to his golf students about how they should approach playing the game. “It was a huge learning thing for me,” Holtby said. “I was always in such a rush to hurry up and get somewhere where I don’t know where I’m going. What I pulled from this has nothing to do with golf. It has to do with life. Enjoy it, because you don’t know what it’s going to be like tomorrow.” —Dave Shelburne covers golf for the Daily News. His column appears Wednesdays. He can be reached at (818) 713-3609 or dave.shelburne@dailynews.com. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe top 10 theme park moments of 2019 last_img read more

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