Temporary amendments to visa application procedures – Bahamas Embassy Haiti

first_img Related Items: Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp#Bahamas, August 28, 2017 – Nassau – The Ministry of Foreign Affairs wishes to advise the travelling public applying for visas at The Bahamas Embassy in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, that, with immediate effect, temporary measures have been put in place regarding the issuance of visas by the Embassy.  This was necessary due to technical constraints.While the temporary measure may initially result in minor delays, the Ministry wishes to assure the public that every effort will be made to process applications in a timely manner. All other functions of the Embassy will continue uninterrupted. The Ministry will advise the public in due course when the Embassy resumes its normal visa issuing function.  The Ministry of Foreign Affairs apologises for any inconvenience caused. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApplast_img read more

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Netflix looking into study showing spike in suicides after 13 Reasons Why

first_img Tags Netflix has addressed a study looking at teen suicide and its show 13 Reasons Why. Justin Sullivan / Getty Images On the heels of a study exploring a rise in teen suicide among boys following the Netflix show 13 Reasons Why in 2017, the streaming service says it’s looking into the research.”This is a critically important topic and we have worked hard to ensure that we handle this sensitive issue responsibly,” Netflix said.The study, out Monday from the Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, found that the suicide rate among boys 10-17 increased in the month after the show came out. The study didn’t confirm whether any of those boys had watched the show.”The release of 13 Reasons Why was associated with a significant increase in monthly suicide rates among US youth aged 10 to 17 years,” the study concludes. “Caution regarding the exposure of children and adolescents to the series is warranted.” Netflix said the research is at odds with another recent study, this one conducted by the University of Pennsylvania. “We’ve just seen this study and are looking into the research, which conflicts with last week’s study from the University of Pennsylvania,” a spokesperson said by email. That study found that “viewers who stopped watching the second season exhibited greater suicide risk and less optimism about the future than those who continued to the end.” The study went on to say that those who watched to the end reported a decline in “suicide ideation and self-harm.” They also might be more likely to help a suicidal person. The premise of 13 Reasons Why related to the suicide of a teenage girl. In May 2017, Netflix said it would include an additional warning at the beginning of the first episode, as well as “strengthen the messaging and resource language in the existing cards for episodes that contain graphic subject matter, including the URL 13ReasonsWhy.info.”If you’re struggling with negative thoughts or suicidal feelings, here are 13 suicide and crisis intervention hotlines you can use to get help.You can also call these numbers:US: The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline can be reached at 1-800-273-8255. UK: The Samaritans can be reached at 116 123. AU: Lifeline can be reached at 13 11 14.  0 Post a comment Digital Media Wellness Share your voice Netflixlast_img read more

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Has MS Dhoni changed his mind about training with the military

first_imgDhoni is scheduled to train with the Indian Army in KashmirCricket World Cup TwitterThe news about Mahendra Singh Dhoni desiring a stint of training with the Indian Army has become old. As per a press release issued by the Army, MSD is slated to be with his battalion from July 31 to August 15 in Kashmir for the training camp. However, the former India captain was present and seen at the Mumbai Airport on Saturday, July 27, leading to speculation about whether he would actually be going through with this commitment.It was due to this engagement that Dhoni had opted out of India’s tour to West Indies which begins in early August. The 2011 World Cup-winning captain had asked for permission to be away from the team for two months. It can be argued that he deserved a break anyway after having been involved in cricket almost continuously since the beginning of IPL. Still, any change of plans is interesting to watch out for.It is worth remembering that since the end of the World Cup, speculation regarding the future of MSD has been fervent. Many believe that the wicketkeeper-batsman is no longer going to be seen on the cricket field. Some reports suggests that he has refused to announce his retirement despite signals being given by the selectors. Speculation is rife about Dhoni’s future after World CupTwitter/Cricket World CupAmidst all these rumours and stories, one thing that was certain was Dhoni’s plan to train with the Army unit of which he is an honorary member. The 38-year old is a Lieutenant Colonel with the Territorial Army’s Parachute Regiment. It can be recalled here that it was due to his involvement with the Army that he was wearing the ‘Balidaan’ insignia on his gloves that had to be removed after objections were raised to the ICC.While training with the Army isn’t necessarily the best way of getting a rest, perhaps the iconic former skipper of Men in Blue felt it is through this type of training that he can best get away from the mental strain that he must have endured, first in the IPL and then in the World Cup.Maybe, the former captain is merely making a small detour through Mumbai and would get to Kashmir in time. Let’s see what happens.last_img read more

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Wolves found to be more cooperative with their own kind than dogs

first_img More information: Sarah Marshall-Pescini et al. Importance of a species’ socioecology: Wolves outperform dogs in a conspecific cooperation task, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2017). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1709027114AbstractA number of domestication hypotheses suggest that dogs have acquired a more tolerant temperament than wolves, promoting cooperative interactions with humans and conspecifics. This selection process has been proposed to resemble the one responsible for our own greater cooperative inclinations in comparison with our closest living relatives. However, the socioecology of wolves and dogs, with the former relying more heavily on cooperative activities, predicts that at least with conspecifics, wolves should cooperate better than dogs. Here we tested similarly raised wolves and dogs in a cooperative string-pulling task with conspecifics and found that wolves outperformed dogs, despite comparable levels of interest in the task. Whereas wolves coordinated their actions so as to simultaneously pull the rope ends, leading to success, dogs pulled the ropes in alternate moments, thereby never succeeding. Indeed in dog dyads it was also less likely that both members simultaneously engaged in other manipulative behaviors on the apparatus. Different conflict-management strategies are likely responsible for these results, with dogs’ avoidance of potential competition over the apparatus constraining their capacity to coordinate actions. Wolves, in contrast, did not hesitate to manipulate the ropes simultaneously, and once cooperation was initiated, rapidly learned to coordinate in more complex conditions as well. Social dynamics (rank and affiliation) played a key role in success rates. Results call those domestication hypotheses that suggest dogs evolved greater cooperative inclinations into question, and rather support the idea that dogs’ and wolves’ different social ecologies played a role in affecting their capacity for conspecific cooperation and communication. (Phys.org)—A team of researchers from the Wolf Science Center and the Comparative Cognition, Messerli Research Institute, both part of the Medical University of Vienna, has found that packs of wolves behave more cooperatively among themselves than do groups of dogs. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes how they tested both groups of animals at their research institute and what they found by doing so. As the researchers note, the consensus among scientists is that dogs are more social than wolves because they have been bred over multiple generations to be social with humans. But do those social skills apply to cooperation with other dogs? That was the question that motivated the researchers to set up an experiment to compare the two groups in a contrived social setting.To test the degree of cooperation of members of a wolf pack or group of dogs, the researchers set up an apparatus that allowed two animals to work together to gain access to a food reward. To obtain a bowl of food, both animals had to tug on separate ropes at the same time—in short, they had to cooperate for the benefit of both.The researchers ran the experiment hundreds of times with multiple pairs of dogs and wolves and then tallied the results. They found that dogs were not good at cooperating to gain a meal—out of 472 tries, the dogs succeeded in getting their reward just two times. The wolves, on the other hand, were much better, getting their reward 100 times out of 416 tries.The researchers noted that the wolves did best when paired with familiar partners that also held the same “rank” in the pack. In watching how the animals went about their task, the researchers found that the wolves were much more willing to approach the food bowl together, rather than one waiting for the other. With dogs, the researchers note, the one that is dominant usually goes first, otherwise fighting erupts. The researchers suggest that by approaching the bowl together, the wolves were able to see more clearly what needed to be done to get their food reward.The researchers suggest that while dogs have clearly learned to be more social and cooperative with humans over the years, they appear to be less so with other dogs. Journal information: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Sensitivity to inequity is in wolves’ and dogs’ blood wolves working at a cooperative rope-pulling test. Credit: Rooobert Bayer (Wolf Science Center, Ernstbrunn, Austria).center_img Explore further © 2017 Phys.org Citation: Wolves found to be more cooperative with their own kind than dogs with theirs (2017, October 17) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-10-wolves-cooperative-kind-dogs.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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