Atlético: a decade without defeat at the premiere of the new year

first_imgIn three seasons, in fact, Atlético did not lose any match of all who played in January: last, with three draws and three wins in six games, 2013-14, with five wins and three draws in eight, and 2011-12, his first, his arrival, with three wins and a draw in four . Its only mole has been the Copa del Rey, with eliminations in January against Girona last season (two draws), Sevilla in 2017-18 and Barcelona in 2013-14. Since 2011, Atleti has started the years in two ways. Sometimes the Cup (as in 2017-18 and 2016-17) and other times in LaLiga, all remaining. In the Cup he always won and by a win, 0-4 at Lleida and 0-2 at Las Palmas. In the League, he tied last season, 2012-13 and 2011-12 against Sevilla, Mallorca and Málaga. The rest, only victories.Twice the Levante … and in both victory Al Levante, the rival with which Atlético will start this 2020, has already been found twice more Simeone since 2011 and both happened the same: Atlético won. Both were in the Metropolitan. In 2014-15 the rojiblancos won by 3-1 on January 3 and, in 2015-16, they did it by 1-0 a 2. Last season Levante was not the first opponent of the year but almost. He was the second in the league: 1-0 rojiblanca victory. New Year and a sure thing in Atlético with Cholo: you don’t lose. Or, at least, with the Argentine coach on the bench the team has never lost. Five wins and three draws is your balance. Zero defeats January, with Cholo, Atlético always starts it on the right foot: the Argentine accumulates 62.5% of victories in the first game of the year since it was released in the club, precisely in January 2012, none of the players of that first eleven are already. HOh, we have to go back eleven, to 2008-09, to find a defeat in the red and white New Year. 3-1 in Mestalla, against Valencia. It was still Javier Aguirre the coach. It is a decade. Since the Argentine coach took the reins of the team he has played 60 games this month, with only 15% losses (The percentage of victories in the whole month is 53%).last_img read more

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Frustrated resident says Highway 99 corridor still dangerous to pedestrians

first_imgVicki Fitzsimmons recalled going to an open house held by Clark County in 2006 about infrastructure projects along Northeast Highway 99 between Northeast 99th and 117th streets. She recalled hearing some encouraging news about how the project called for more sidewalks along the corridor that’s particularly unfriendly to pedestrians.“I just thought, ‘It’s about time,’ ” she said.Since then, Fitzsimmons has kept the handout from the meeting that promised the highway “will become more pedestrian friendly” and set preliminary construction dates of winter 2011 and summer 2012 for the $2 million project.Twelve years later, the county has made some pedestrian-oriented improvements along the stretch. But Fitzsimmons said the corridor remains dangerous for pedestrians. She said she’s frustrated by the lack of progress, particularly as she’s watched other county projects move forward.“I just kind of feel like I’m banging my head against the wall,” she said.Fitzsimmons, who serves as president of the Sherwood Hills Neighborhood Association, said that having pedestrian-friendly infrastructure is a quality-of-life issue. She said that for some more vulnerable residents, it’s an issue of basic safety.She said there is a trailer park as well as apartments that house low-income individuals along the corridor. She said that many of their residents don’t have cars. Fitzsimmons also said they have no choice but to make their way to the store or bus stops along the busy highway using bike lanes or deteriorating patches of pavement. She said that sometimes she sees people in wheelchairs or pushing baby carriages.last_img read more

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Yukon Quest racers drop off food gear for checkpoints

first_imgYukon Quest mushers have surpassed a major milestone in preparation for running next month’s race. Tons of race food and gear were dropped off over the weekend for shipping to checkpoints along the thousand mile route between Fairbanks and Whitehorse.Download AudioBrent Sass races to a first-place finish at the 2015 Yukon Quest. The 2016 race starts Feb 1. (Photo: Emily Russell/KNOM)Laura Neese decided she wanted to be a long-distance dog musher when she was 9 years old. Ten years later, after finishing high school early and earning a bachelor’s degree in veterinary technology, she’s about to run her first 1,000-mile sled dog race.“I’m just excited to finally be here.”The 19-year-old rookie drove from Michigan to Fairbanks last week with fourteen dogs and one handler.In less than two weeks, Neese will join 23 other mushers on the Chena River in downtownFairbanks for the start of the 33rd Yukon Quest International Sled Dog race. She’s the youngest in the field.“My goals are to learn the trail, gain experience, since this is my first thousand mile race, and kind of work toward future years to become competitive.”On Saturday she dropped off a few dozen bags of race supplies at Summit Logistics. The bags contain everything she needs on the trail: extra booties and blankets, kibble, meat, and fat for the dogs, as well as food for herself.“I brought three different meals to each checkpoint for myself: pasta, tater tots with cheese, and Pizza Hut pizza.”She also added a local treat from her hometown, Ohio: “Buckeyes, the chocolate peanut butter cookies.”On Saturday afternoon, food started pouring in to the big parking lot off Van Horn. A steady stream of dog trucks and trailers pulled up filled with white mesh bags. Volunteers descended, grabbing bags, attaching labels, and stacking them on pallets destined for remote spots of Alaska and the Yukon: Central, Eagle, Pelly Crossing.There are nine checkpoints in the race where mushers can reload on these supplies. But some are as far as 200 miles apart. Everything they need in between has to go in their sled.“So, a pair of snowshoes, an ax, fuel, a cooker, sleeping bag. Anything for the dogs and musher to survive staying out there in the cold,” says race volunteer Marie Oleson. She’s signing in the mushers and overseeing the flow of baggage. As the day goes on, the piles grow taller and taller.Fairbanks musher Cody Strathe dropped off more than 3,000 pounds of gear. That’s 44 bags for himself, plus another 40 for his wife, Paige Drobny. They’ve both run the Quest before, but never in the same year.They spent the past two weeks cooking, cutting, bagging, and organizing food – in between training runs.“It’s a little hectic. Right now we sometimes wonder why we’re doing it but here in a week or two it’ll become clear again and it’ll be a lot of fun.”Their friends helped them put together the menu for the trail. Strathe is most excited about the little cheesecakes waiting for him along the way. There’s a special dessert for the dogs too.“We’ve got tripe. We’ve got salmon. We’ve got beaver meat. Actually, beaver meat’s probably the equivalent of cheesecake for them. It’s really rich. They eat it no matter what. They love it – it makes them happy.”That’s the most important part of long-distance racing, Strathe says. Keeping the runners happy.“Music is definitely a secret weapon. And this year we had a bunch of friends donate iPods that were all loaded up with music. So we’ve got an arsenal of good booty shakin’ and bluegrass and whatever else music. So we’ll be able to keep the morale high by keeping yourself happy. If you’re happy then the dogs are happy.”Volunteers wrapped the pallets in plastic wrap and divided them up by country – half the gear went in the back of a semi truck headed for the border. The rest was stored in a pair of Connexes.The mushers looked relieved as they drove off with empty trucks.The Yukon Quest starts in Fairbanks on February 6 at 11a.m.last_img read more

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