BREEDERS’ CUP SAFETY AND SECURITY BRIEFING TO BE HELD WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30 AT SANTA ANITA PARK

first_imgBREEDERS’ CUP SAFETY AND SECURITY BRIEFING TO BE HELD WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 30 AT SANTA ANITA PARKBreeders’ Cup Limited will conduct a security and safety briefing on the Equine procedures and protocols for the 2019 Breeders’ Cup World Championship on Wednesday, Oct. 30 at Santa Anita Park for credentialed media.WHAT:        Breeders’ Cup World Championships Safety and Security BriefingWHEN:       Wednesday, Oct. 30 at 11:00 a.m.WHERE:    Baldwin Terrace Conference RoomThird Floor, West GrandstandSanta Anita Park285 West Huntington DriveArcadia, CaliforniaWHO:          Craig Fravel, President and Chief Executive Officer, Breeders’ CupDora Delgado, Executive Vice President, Racing & Nominations, Breeders’CupDr. Debbie Lamparter, Veterinary Team Leader, Breeders’ CupDr. Dionne Benson, Chief Veterinary Officer, The Stronach GroupDr. Rick Arthur, Equine Medical Director, California Horse Racing BoardTim Grande, Chief Veterinarian, California Horse Racing BoardDr. William Farmer, Breeders’ Cup Out-of-Competition Veterinarian andAdvisorMichael “Mick” Peterson, Ph.D., Executive Director, Racing Surfaces Testing  Laboratory & Professor of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering,  University of KentuckyMichael Prosser, Regional Head of Racing, East, Newmarket RacecoursePROGRAM TOPICS: Stressing the overall importance of the welfare and safety of the participants in this year’s World Championships, Breeders’ Cup and Santa Anita Park will lead a panel discussion on the following topics:-Expanded testing protocols-Strengthened onsite requirements-Increased medication restrictions-Ongoing racing surface maintenance and testing-Injury management and emergency response protocols***Directions to Santa Anita: Exit I-210 at Baldwin Avenue and go south. After approximately 7/10 of a mile, turn left just before the Westfield Mall, which is Gate 8 at Santa Anita Park. Bear left along the hedges (do not go straight into the main parking lot.) Pull up to the security gate and ask to be directed to Baldwin Terrace Conference Room.last_img read more

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Former Los Alamos physicist denies federal charges he lied about China ties

first_img By David MalakoffMay. 28, 2019 , 6:00 PM Email Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country A physicist who spent 2 decades at the Department of Energy’s Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in New Mexico today pleaded not guilty to federal charges of lying about his involvement in a research funding program run by the Chinese government. Prosecutors allege that Turab Lookman, who worked at LANL from 1999 until recently, repeatedly denied involvement with China’s Thousand Talents Program, despite having agreed to join it “for personal compensation.”“We look forward to presenting a vigorous defense,” Lookman’s attorney, Paul Linnenburger of Rothstein Donatelli LLP in Santa Fe, tells ScienceInsider. Lookman, who has a doctorate in theoretical physics and was awarded a prestigious LANL fellowship in 2017, presented his plea to a federal magistrate judge in Albuquerque, New Mexico.A federal grand jury on 22 May indicted Lookman on three charges of making false statements about his contacts with the Thousand Talents Program, which since 2008 has used offers of salaries and other support to establish ties with scientists working outside of China. Prosecutors allege that Lookman lied about his interactions with the program on a computerized employment form in 2017, as well as during conversations last year with a LANL counterintelligence officer and an investigator from a federal agency that conducts background checks. Specifically, prosecutors allege that “a foreign national had … asked [Lookman] to apply for” the Thousand Talents Program sometime before November 2017, and that he had “applied for, and been accepted to participate in” the program before June 2018. The charges carry a maximum penalty of 5 years in prison. 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Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) The Thousand Talents Program has drawn extensive attention from U.S. officials in recent years, with some alleging that it has become a vehicle for the Chinese government to take unfair advantage of U.S.-funded research. Several thousand scientists, many of them ethnic Chinese or Chinese Americans living in the United States, have been supported by the program over the past decade. Prosecutors in the Lookman case characterized Thousand Talents in a 24 May press release as “a program established by the Chinese government to recruit people with access to and knowledge of foreign technology and intellectual property.”As a result of such concerns, the Department of Energy has moved to bar researchers it funds from participating in the program and similar talent recruitment efforts run by other nations. And some biomedical researchers who participate in Thousand Talents and have funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) have been investigated by their universities after NIH asked whether they may have violated federal rules requiring disclosure of foreign ties. At least two institutions, MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas, and Emory University in Atlanta, have ousted researchers involved in Thousand Talents after NIH raised concerns. In China, the controversy has reportedly prompted officials to advise participants to remove mention of their involvement from websites and resumes.According to a 2017 LANL press release, Lookman worked in the laboratory’s theoretical division and was “an expert in the computational physics of materials, complex fluids, and nonlinear dynamics. His recent work on materials design and informatics applies data science to the discovery of materials with new, beneficial properties. … He is co-author of two books and more than 250 publications.”At today’s hearing, Lookman, who had been in federal custody since 23 May, was released to home detention with a GPS monitoring bracelet after posting a $50,000 bond.last_img read more

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