Faster to get a newborn to school than save for a unit

first_imgRateCity says new buyers need to consider initiatives that can speed up the process such as FHB grants by state governments for new construction. Picture: Penny Stephens 1 in 4 homeowners would fail new mortgage tests Affordability to spark Brisbane rise More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus17 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market17 hours ago Twin-floor penthouse to rule them all The savings have to cover a 10 per cent deposit as well as lenders mortgage insurance for FHBs and stamp duty. Sally Tindall, RateCity’s research director, drew hope from the figures saying it proved that getting a foot in the door was tough but not impossible.“As the property market declines and investors dip out, there’s now a real opportunity for first home buyers to get into the market,” she said. How long it takes to save a home loan deposit in Australia. Source: RateCity.“There are a couple of things they can do to maximise their chances of getting a home. They include saving a big enough deposit to avoid paying lenders mortgage insurance and taking advantage of the first homebuyer grants and stamp duty exemptions in your state.”She said two ways first home buyers could reduce the cost of their home loan was to save a 20 per cent deposit to avoid lenders mortgage insurance and to stay under the stamp duty cap to capitalise on any state FHB exemptions.State first homebuyer grants were also a key thing to watch out for, as well as parking savings in a high interest account. The other option was to “look into the federal government’s First Home Super Saver Scheme where you can use your superannuation account as a way to help saving your deposit, taking advantage of tax concessions”. FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON FACEBOOK Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 9:24Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -9:24 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD288p288pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenCoreLogic Brisbane Housing Market Update – August 201809:25 It can be quicker to get a newborn to their first day of school than save a home loan deposit in some Australian cities, new research has found. Picture: AAP Image / Angelo Velardo.IT’S faster to get a newborn to their first day of school than save for a home loan deposit in parts of Australia, new research has found.New research by RateCity.com.au on how long it takes to save a home loan deposit in Australia found first home buyers looking for a median-priced unit in Brisbane ($382,601) could take just over two years if they put away $400 a week or four years if they made that $200 a week. Only Darwin had a better savings timeline out of all the capital cities — with FHBs there taking one year and seven months to save enough to afford a $303,889 unit which is the median price there.But the shock find was Sydney, where it takes nine and a half years for buyers to putting away $200 a week to afford a median unit ($740,093), and if they doubled their savings — putting in $400 a week — they could have a deposit together in the time it takes to get a newborn to their first day of school: Five years.last_img read more

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Callie Hoegeman

first_imgCallie Hoegeman, age 79 of Batesville, died Sunday, April 16, 2017 at her home.  Born October 19, 1937, in Burning Springs, Kentucky, she is the daughter of Amanda (Nee: Lunsford) and Samuel Jewell.  She married Albert Hoegeman Sr. July 20, 1956 in Brookville, Indiana and he preceded her in death December 25, 2010.  She was a homemaker and a member of Batesville Eagles Aerie #1130 and the Batesville V.F.W. Post #3183 Ladies Auxiliary.Callie enjoyed trying her luck at the casino, playing bingo or in a poker game.  She and Albert liked walking in the woods, fishing and taking drives, looking for new fishing holes to try.  For years she bowled in leagues, got a kick out of playing video games and according to her family, was an excellent cook whose chicken and dumplings and banana pudding will be sorely missed.  Callie was a Colts fan or a Peyton Manning fan depending on who you asked and her family laughed that while she’s never held a golf club in her life, she followed it on T.V. and was a diehard Tiger Woods fan and more recently rooted for Rickie Fowler.  What she loved best was having the family together and spending time with her grandkids.Callie is survived by her daughters Margaret Barry of Greensburg, Indiana, Brenda Allen of Batesville; sons Don Hoegeman of Batesville, Willie Hoegeman of Milan, Indiana, Dave Hoegeman of Sunman, Indiana; brother James Jewell of North Vernon, Indiana; 20 grandchildren and 28 great grandchildren.  In addition to her husband and parents, she is also preceded in death by her son Albert Hoegeman Jr., brothers Carlos, Samuel, Ted and Homer Jewell and sisters Maggie Gilbreath and Lucy Cranfill.Visitation is Thursday, April 20th, from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. at the Weigel Funeral Home.  Funeral services follow at 1 p.m. with Rev. Steve Yeaton officiating and burial will be in St. John’s Huntersville Cemetery.  The family requests memorials to American Lung Association.last_img read more

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Man Utd make surprise decision over Ighalo’s permanent deal

first_imgManchester United have reportedly cooled plans to sign Nigeria’s Odion Ighalo permanently or extend his loan spell beyond the end of May, as they want to see what happens with the continuation of the Premier League campaign.Advertisement According to a report in the Daily Mail, Man United have also decided against recalling Dean Henderson from Sheffield United.Ighalo looks set to return to Chinese Super League side Shanghai Shenhua at the end of May.The Nigerian striker signed a short-term loan deal with United after the CSL was suspended earlier this year.His current loan contract – which sees United pay him £130,000-per-week, will expire on May 31, and United will have to make an offer to Shanghai Shenhua in order to extend it.Though according to the Mail, United are not planning to do so, and want to wait and see what happens with the rest of the Premier League season.Reports last month suggested the Red Devils were planning to make an offer to sign Ighalo permanently, and had been told to fork over just £17million to do so.Though now, Shanghai Shenhua have made plans to offer the 30-year-old a new contract in China earning a sky-high £400,000-per-week.Ighalo has impressed at Old TraffordRead Also: Eberechi Eze reveals desire of playing football at highest levelIghalo has been impressive while on loan at United, and has been used as an impact sub.He has scored four goals in eight appearances for Ole Gunnar Solskjaer’s side, but his future has been clouded by the coronavirus pandemic.Ahead of a meeting between Premier League clubs on Monday, there is still no date for the league to return, and United don’t want to get drawn into paying Ighalo’s wages if he isn’t likely to feature again.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… center_img Promoted ContentWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooWhat Are The Most Delicious Foods Out There?Best & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeTop 7 Best Car Manufacturers Of All TimeTop 10 Tiniest Phones Ever MadeThis Guy Photoshopped Himself Into Celeb Pics And It’s HystericalThe 10 Best Secondary Education Systems In The WorldThe Best Cars Of All Time7 Black Hole Facts That Will Change Your View Of The UniverseThe Highest Paid Football Players In The World5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parkslast_img read more

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Bakayoko returning back to Milan

first_imgMilan are reportedly on the verge of bringing Tiemoue Bakayoko back to San Siro, on loan from Chelsea with the option to buy. According to Sky Sport Italia, the Premier League side is now ready to accept the terms of the deal. This would be a paid loan for one season, with the option to buy in June 2021, for a total of circa €30-32m. It’s a return to Milan for Bakayoko, who already had a successful loan spell here in 2018-19, racking up 31 competitive games in Gennaro Gattuso’s squad. Both the player and club wanted to make the move permanent, but not at the €40m that Chelsea were asking for.Advertisement Bakayoko has since gone on another loan at AS Monaco, but again failed to make it stick. The 26-year-old’s contract with Chelsea only runs to June 2022, so this is their last real chance to allow a loan with option to buy and not risk losing him on a free transfer. read also:Bakayoko accepts pay cut for Milan return Bakayoko made the €40m move from Monaco in 2017, but only made 43 appearances for Chelsea, contributing three goals and three assists. The midfielder is so eager to secure the return to Milan that Sportitalia claim he has accepted a pay cut from his €6m per year salary. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Loading… center_img Promoted ContentThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?She Managed To Change The Lives Of Pakistan WomenRobert Pattinson Showed The GQ Magazine What Quarantining MeansBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For Them5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme Parks6 Incredibly Strange Facts About HurricanesCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?8 Shows You Didn’t Want To Watch At The End12 Stars You Would Never Recognize Without Their Signature Look7 Reasons It’s Better To Be A VeganEver Thought Of Sleeping Next To Celebs? This Guy Will Show Youlast_img read more

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Morocco withdraw from CHAN 2020

first_imgRelatedPosts COVID-19: NCAA to revoke erring airlines licence over non-compliance FRSC to Schools: We’ll arrest, prosecute drivers who flout COVID-19 rules Sanwo-Olu: We’re committed to fulfilling promises to Lagosians Following the COVID-19 Pandemic, reigning champions Morocco have cancelled their CHAN 2020 camp and have withdrawn from the competition. On March 11, CAF issued a statement regarding the matter, stating that all its competitions will go on behind closed doors despite the Coronavirus Pandemic situation. This stance seems to contradict their prior decision of suspending the 2021 Africa Cup of Nations Qualifiers just a few days ago. The 2020 African Nations championship should kick off April 4, 2020 and end on April 25, 2020 in Cameroon. The Africa giants announced their decision and have already written to the Confederation of African Football over the matter. Morocco were drawn in Group C with Uganda, Togo and Rwanda. On March 15, host country Cameroon reported their fifth case of Coronavirus. Twelve out of the participating 16 countries have also reported cases of Coronavirus as well. The only exceptions being Mali, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe. CAF said it is currently assessing the situation to decide whether to proceed without spectators or announce suspension.Tags: africacafCHAN 2020CoronavirusCOVID-19Moroccolast_img read more

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Guinness Greatest of the Streets| Victoria, BV and Plaisance through to East Coast Zone main draw

first_imgVictoria, BV ‘B’, Plaisance ‘B’ and Guyana Water Incorporated [GWI] were among the teams to progress to the main draw in the Guinness ‘Greatest of the Streets, East Coast Demerara edition, following playoff wins yesterday.Urged on by a sizable crowd at the Haslington Market Tarmac, newcomer Victoria secured two hard-fought victories to earn their place in the main tournament.Victoria fielded a young but determined side and defeated the experienced Vryheid’s Lust outfit 2-0 on penalty kicks after regulation time ended scoreless. In their second matchup, Victoria needled Paradise ‘B’ 1-0.Meanwhile, former champions BV ‘B’ extinguished Belfield Stars 2-0, while Plaisance ‘B’ overcame United Ballers 2-0 on penalty kicks, following a scoreless regulation time interval.However, GWI would provide the unlikely result of the match-day, dismantling Nabaclis by an impressive 5-0 scoreline.In other results, newcomer Non Pareil edged Plaisance ‘A’ 2-1 on penalty kicks, after a scoreless regulation time interval failed to decide the outcome.Former winners Melanie ‘A’ defeated Police ‘A’ via walkover, with debutant, Liliendaal Hustlers, defeating Police ‘B’ in the identical manner.Following the conclusion of the playoff round, the 16 teams that will contest the three-day tournament are defending champions Uprising, along with Paradise ‘A’, BV ‘A’, Melanie ‘B’, Buxton Diamond, Mahaica Determinators, Victoria Church Yard, Belfield Warriors, Haslington Hypers, Melanie ‘A’, BV ‘B’, Liliendaal Hustlers, Plaisance ‘B’, GWI East Coast, Victoria and Non Pareil.The championship will officially commence on Friday (April 12) at the same venue, with the final two nights slated for April 13th and 22nd respectively. Fixtures for the opening night will be released in the coming days.last_img read more

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NBBF Holds AGM, Awards Dinner in Abuja

first_imgThe Nigeria Basketball Federation (NBBF), will on January 30, 2017 in Abuja hosts its Annual General Meeting to give stakeholders an account of its stewardship in the year 2016.On January 31, 2017, the federation will also hold an Awards Dinner to recognise, appreciate and honour deserving athletes, administrators, technical officials, sponsors, partners, contributors as well as the media for their meritorious service and outstanding contribution to the development and growth of the game in Nigeria.Prominent among those to be honoured are two former presidents of the NBBF, His Royal Majesty, the Gbom Gwom Jos, J.D. Buba and Senator U.K. Umar. There are also going to be post-humous awards to a late Vice President of the federation, Dr Segun Erinle, late FIBA Referee, Chris Obojememe and late national coaches, Danjuma Lemmy Harry and Danjuma Dan Azumi.Expected to attend the events are the Youth and Sports Minister, his Information, Culture and National Orientation counterpart as well as members of the National Assembly.In addition, the annual Refresher Course for all technical officials expected to participate in the federation’s activities for the 2017 season will hold at the NIS Conference Room at the Package B of the Abuja National Stadium from January 31 to February 3, 2017.At the end of the Course, the officials are expected to undergo an examination with which to grade them in readiness for their effective contribution to the development of the various activities of the federation this year and beyond.Share this:FacebookRedditTwitterPrintPinterestEmailWhatsAppSkypeLinkedInTumblrPocketTelegramlast_img read more

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Students studying in Chile safe after 8.8-magnitude quake

first_imgThe devastating 8.8-magnitude earthquake that struck Chile this weekend, killing more than 700 people, hit close to home for many members of the USC community, particularly four USC students studying abroad in Santiago who had been there less than two weeks and students with family in Chile.The four USC students, Andres Blumer, a junior majoring in international relations (global business); Kaitlin King, a junior majoring in anthropology; Marianna Singwi-Ferrono, a junior majoring in Spanish and international relations; and Ryan Soderberg, a junior majoring in business administration, survived uninjured, but said the hours after the quake hit Santiago were dizzying. Because phone and power lines were out, the members of the group had a hard time communicating with each other and with their families in the United States.For students with family members in Chile, communication was just as difficult. Cell phone lines were down, and many residents of Chile do not have land lines.Answers trickled in slowly for both groups.The four students verified that everyone in the group was OK but only after driving around Santiago to find each other. Students in Los Angeles confirmed their family members’ safety but only after long hours wrought with anxious anticipation. And though their immediate questions were answered and their concerns quelled, for many there is still a felling of uncertainty.Experiencing history abroadThe city of Santiago, north of the earthquake’s epicenter, is at a relative standstill. Residents are staying in, buildings are damaged, roads are closed and public transportation is down. The four students, who have been in Chile less than two weeks, are not sure when they’ll return to school, when they’ll be able to use their cell phones again and, for some of them, when they will have power.Just more than 24 hours ago, the city was shaking.Blumer, one of the four students in Chile, was staying at an apartment in a Santiago suburb, north of the earthquake’s epicenter. He was sleeping peacefully, he said, until the shaking began.The walls shook. The floor rumbled. The sound of glass breaking was muffled by the screeches of car alarms going off all down the street. Blumer had to hold on to avoid crashing to the floor. Amid the chaos of the 8.8-magnitude earthquake that struck the coast of Chile early Saturday morning, the four USC students studying abroad found themselves thrust into a the heart of disaster.The students are all living in separate homes in the suburbs of Santiago. Waking up to the earth’s violent shaking, they were forced to navigate the catastrophe with no power, no familiar faces and with few people who spoke their native language.Blumer said his neighbors gathered to make sure everyone was accounted for, but everyone was speaking fast and with an accent it couldn’t quite cut through. Even the radio news, he said, “was all very fast and in Spanish so hard for me to understand.”He did not know the full extent of the damage until the electricity came back later in the morning and he could turn on the news.Cell phone lines were also down, and other members of the group could not reach Blumer.“My host family and I drove to Andres Blumer’s house to make sure he was safe, since I couldn’t reach him by phone,” Soderberg wrote in an e-mail. “I was happy to find him smoking a cigarette with the rest of his apartment building.”Blumer, who was lucky enough to get Internet and power back within a few hours of the earthquake, e-mailed his parents and the parents of the other students in Chile to assure them that everyone was OK.Although the situation became clearer as the day went on and worry turned to relief as the students connected with each and their families, the chaos did not end there.Aftershocks, some reaching magnitudes above 6.5, continued to shake the city. Power remained out in many areas, and students were told to stay in their houses. Most of the city’s police force has been called to areas that have been worse hit and the city has become prone to crime.Though Santiago fared better than other areas, Blumer said, the news reports have put the disaster in context for the four USC students.“It’s just starting to hit me that we … just lived through history,” Blumer wrote.A world awayThey got the news first by phone.Natalia Bogolasky Fliman, a graduate student studying journalism, first heard from her friend in New York, who had been on the phone with someone in Chile at the time the earthquake hit. Cristina Pandol, a senior majoring in psychology, got the CNN news update on her cell phone.The news came first, but information about their family members came later.Pandol said she first called her mom, who had been trying to get in touch with family members. Pandol began calling too, but because cell phones were down it took an hour and a half before she got to anyone.“I was lucky I could talk to my dad only an hour or an hour and a half after the earthquake happened and I could hear from him and he was okay,” she said.Bogolasky Fliman was able to reach her family within an hour and a half, she said, and verified that everyone was OK.Both natives of Chile, Bogolasky Fliman and Pandol said earthquakes are a common occurrence, but this one was different.“This is huge,” Bogolasky Fliman said. “Even though if you grow up in Chile you’re used to waking up in the middle of the night with tremors, this was stronger and longer.”But Chile’s history of earthquakes, Pandol said, might have been what helped keep so many people safe.In 1960, a catastrophic 9.6-magnitude earthquake struck Chile. Since then, earthquake preparedness has been a priority for the country.“Anything that would have fallen fell in 1960, and anything that’s been built since then has had top-notch earthquake stability,” Pandol said. “Everything has been to prepare for another 9.6 and this was an 8.8, which is still really large, but it’s not a 9.6 and we’ve been preparing for a 9.6 since 1960 … Everyone knows what to do.”Although Pandol’s and Bogolasky Fliman’s friends and family survived unharmed, Pandol said some of her family members are still lacking water, gas and power.Two of Pandol’s aunts live in Santiago, but only one has power. The two families have banded together, bathing in one’s swimming pool, since there is still no water.Still, Pandol and Bogolasky Fliman are grateful their families were not further south, close to Concepción.“Some highways in [Santiago] are damaged, some of my friends’ houses are really damaged, but in Santiago it’s not as bad as cities in the south like Concepción,” Bogolasky Fliman said. “Things are really far from being normal but it’s not as bad as it is in the South.”The road aheadThe earthquake has left 700 dead and two million displaced so far. Roads are closed and power and gas lines still down. The aftershocks have faded, but the uncertainty is only growing.The four USC students have found their experience changed dramatically, and there’s no indication as to when it might return to a comfortable routine.“Things right now are pretty crazy as people are vandalizing and ransacking supermarkets,” Soderberg wrote. “The U.S. Embassy has notified us saying that we are not allowed to leave Santiago. My host family says I am only allowed to leave during the day.”Tracey Seslen, an assistant professor of clinical finance and business economics who has lived in Chile and traveled there with student groups, said the country will rebound once the initial shock has passed.“In my opinion, Chile is the most first-world of the countries in Latin America,” Seslen said. “I think they’re going to recover from this in a fairly short period of time.”That recovery time might not be quick enough for the group of USC Marshall School of Business students slated to head to Chile over spring break to make their trip, however.“There’s a group of freshmen in [Learning about International Commerce (LINC) Program] going to be going over spring break, and I would bet that they’re not going to be able to go,” Seslen said. “I saw pictures of the airport, which I’ve been to many, many times, and it looked like a disaster area.”The students in the program don’t know any more than what they have heard on the news. Several students said they hadn’t heard anything from the program, and one had spoken with the organizer but still didn’t have a definitive answer.Despite the questions that remain, the USC students with family in Chile and those studying abroad in Chile said they are simply thankful that the worst has passed.“It is great to know that the Trojan Family exists outside of USC,” Soderberg wrote.Correction: Tracey Seslen was originally identified as Teresa Selsen.last_img read more

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Henson: Taking it to the Max one final time

first_imgCamp Randall Stadium and the Kohl Center – those were the two places I had to see during my first visit to Madison.The college sports town environment was something I wanted to experience. The massive tailgates on Saturdays, the band, the ridiculously long lines to get a front row seat, the thousands of people all wearing the same color.Like so many of you, that’s what I wanted, and that’s exactly what I got when I enrolled at UW (fortunately at a time when Wisconsin athletic success is at an all-time high). But after a year on campus, I realized I wanted even more. I wanted to write about the Badgers – specifically the football and men’s hockey team. I wanted to interview the players and coaches. The Badger Herald provided that opportunity of a lifetime. For the past couple years, I’ve used this column to give you everything I’ve got to offer regarding the Badgers. What I saw, what I heard, what I felt – all of it. And I’ve got a simple final thought to pass along: Madison and UW athletics are pretty special.This isn’t news. You’ve heard that said quite often by a number of people – most notably ESPN personality Scott Van Pelt, who claimed Madison is the greatest college town in America (something he reaffirmed after UW’s victory over No.1 ranked Ohio State this past season).But what is it that makes Madison and its love for the Badgers so different? What makes the sports scene on this campus so special?I’ll do my best to explain with a couple moments that have stuck with me.Walk around Madison on a football Saturday or take in a game at the Kohl Center and you’ll feel the energy and excitement. Watch the Badgers beat the top-ranked Buckeyes and you’ll see something otherworldly.But there are tons of college campuses across the country that can offer incredible game day environments. Schools like Texas or Florida or North Carolina come to mind. You know, those schools with “followers” nationwide. Those few schools whose apparel is layered on a table at every single Foot Locker or Champs across the country.Wisconsin doesn’t usually come to mind when you ask the average sports fan to name the top college athletic programs – although that may change thanks to continued success in football and basketball to go along with an already-legendary hockey program.But that doesn’t matter to the people in this state. Sure, they want the wins and the national respect, but Wisconsin is their team regardless. Fans, students and alumni relish the uniqueness that is Madison and the often-overlooked Badgers.The Badgers have all of Wisconsin’s attention (except a segment of basketball fans who root for Marquette). In the fall, Badger football captivates the state, and it’s something that’s difficult to understand unless you actually live it.As junior linebacker and Ashwaubenon-native Mike Taylor put it during a Rose Bowl pep rally, he went to UW because “that’s what Wisconsin kids do.”All that pride comes together in Madison on game days.Close to 90,000 people fill Camp Randall each and every Saturday. The Badgers sold out every men’s basketball game at the Kohl Center this year and led the Big Ten with over 17,000 in the crowd each night. And when it comes to hockey, the men’s and women’s teams are always atop the list in attendance numbers.But you can get an even greater appreciation for Badger pride once you venture away from Madison.As a beat writer, I’ve done my fair share of traveling.From football in Las Vegas to Frozen Four action in Detroit, I’ve hit the road for countless hours with colleagues and friends to watch Wisconsin compete.Of course, we weren’t the only ones.Badger fans travel everywhere. Walk into a bar in hostile territory and it won’t take long to spot a group in red.Like the group of men in an Iowa City bar who talked at length about their mission to attend a Badger football road game each year over a few pitchers.Or the friendly couple tailgating in the TCF Bank Stadium parking lot who wanted to know everything about our work covering the Badgers for the student paper.Anywhere I went there was someone to listen to. Some group of fans that just loved their Badgers and wanted to talk about it.I learned quickly what Big Ten country and lifelong Badger fans were all about.Then the Rose Bowl happened and I learned more. The night before the game, while enjoying the media party at the ESPN Zone in the downtown Los Angeles, the UW band showed up for an outdoor performance at LA Live/Nokia Plaza. 10 minutes later, there was a sea of Wisconsin red. Lakers fans looked out from the Staples Center balcony to watch as thousands of Badger fans sang and danced to their favorite songs – the songs you suddenly know all the words to after a few seasons.In that moment, you knew you were witnessing something special, something rare. It was as if Madison briefly relocated to downtown LA.It said what the Badgers mean to people in a way words simply could not.And it was why J.J. Watt and his teammates were so heartbroken after that loss to TCU.Watt’s tears weren’t so much a result of the realization that he wouldn’t ever personally own a Rose Bowl championship ring, although there is no question that was part of it.Watt broke down when he thought about the fans, when he thought about the 70,000 Badgers who came to Pasedena hoping for the victory he worked so hard to give them.“We know how much this means to everybody, to everybody involved,” he said.After four years at this university, you understand how much it means.Sports unite people on this campus. They are an integral part of the school’s identity.Years ago I sought out a college town that was just as passionate about sports as I was. I wanted a school with an athletic program I would be proud of. A place that would give me four years I would never forget.I found it in Madison.Max is a senior majoring in journalism. If you couldn’t already tell, he’s going to miss this place. But he’ll be back. Any final thoughts you’d like to send his way? Send them to mhenson@badgerherald.comlast_img read more

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Knutson and Ramirez drop 5th-straight doubles match

first_imgPittsburgh’s Claudia Bartolome and Gabriela Rezende celebrated with fist bumps and a high five when Gabriela Knutson’s backhand went too long. This gave the Panthers a 6-2 win, ultimately culminating into Pittsburgh’s first Atlantic Coast Conference doubles point this season.Knutson looked to the ceiling. Although No. 30 Syracuse (12-8, 5-6 Atlantic Coast) would go on to defeat Pittsburgh (4-14, 0-11) 5-2, the loss added up to their fifth straight. Just one court over, a banner hung celebrating Knutson and Ramirez’s All-American doubles honors in 2018, the first in program history. This year, the pair, while still receiving a national ranking at No. 90, is 10-8 and hasn’t found the same success that allowed them to finish at No. 8 last season.“They know that they’re a very good team,” head coach Younes Limam said. “And they just need to go and commit to their shots and play with a lot of energy, obviously. But also when you’re returning, when you’re serving, you gotta go and get it and commit to your shots.”The pair was broken early as Pittsburgh gained a 1-0 lead on a Ramirez shot into the net. The Panthers held serve easily. Down 2-0, Knutson shook her hand after a serve that went weak into the net. She shook her head and squinted in a bit of pain.Limam had been aware her right arm had been bothering her even before today’s match and decided to rest her after doubles. Knutson said Thursday her health might be one of the reasons for the slip in the rankings. Between laryngitis and colds, she said she’s had “one, max two weeks” of full being fully healthy.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I was hoping that we’d shoot up quicker,” Knutson said Thursday “… I don’t really know what’s missing. It’s kind of up and down.”After being broken again, Knutson and Ramirez got one back. A powerful backhand winner down the line from Knutson made it 30-30. She swung through the next serve, but the Orange pair was able to force a deuce and then win the next.On Ramirez’s serve the pair was up 40-30, but a forehand by Ramirez into the net forced a deuce. This time Pittsburgh came through.“They were playing really good at net,” Ramirez said. “They knew when to poach, when to stay back so it was really tough to get it by them.”Down 4-1, the Orange badly needed a break. Pittsburgh wouldn’t cede it, though, and miscommunication between the Knutson and Ramirez resulted in the final point. A shot fell between them as Ramirez started reaching back but didn’t commit and Knutson didn’t have enough time to then react.The chemistry between the pair has rarely faded, however. Knutson and Ramirez strive to play a mens’ doubles style, staying more aggressive at the net.“Sometimes, even when we had bad matches, we know who we are as a team and what we’re capable of,” Knutson said. “That even if we’re not playing that good, I would not want to choose anyone else.”Syracuse would get one more game back, holding serve, but then failed to break Pittsburgh. Throughout the Orange’s losing streak they played a handful of nationally ranked duos but only one player on the Panther’s roster is currently ranked: Bartolome at No. 125 in singles.Limam knows what his top singles pair is capable of. Confidence, he said, could be playing a role after their recent stretch.“You win a few matches and all of a sudden, you’re rolling, you’re playing with more authority, you’re playing on your terms,” Limam said. “And you lose some matches and everything that you do, you start thinking twice, and the last thing you want to do in tennis, or in any sport is to overthink things.”The pair’s season may not end up as banner worthy as the prior season. But Knutson and Ramirez still serve as the backbone of the team. When they win in doubles, the team is 8-2. The Orange haven’t won a doubles point this season when Ramirez and Knutson fall.“I don’t think we’ve been blown off the court once,” Ramirez said. “So we’re still right there, we’re still a great team and we know that, everyone knows that. So yeah, we’re still doing well.” Comments Published on April 5, 2019 at 8:21 pm Contact Eric: estorms@syr.edu Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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