Sea Shepherd Taino Warriors And Michelle Rodriguez Team To Provide Sustainable Tools

first_imgSea Shepherd Conservation Society has partnered with Taino Warriors and actor/activist Michelle Rodriguez on a campaign to help the hurricane ravaged and economically impacted island of Puerto Rico rebuild in a sustainable manner.Video: Taino Spirit Promise Campaign VideoThe campaign, titled Operation Taino Spirit Promise, comes 75 days after Hurricane Maria devastated Puerto Rico, forcing a complete rebuild of its already weakened infrastructure.In the spirit of Puerto Rico’s indigenous Taino people, Operation Taino Spirit Promise, will deliver supplies to local Puerto Rican NGOs committed to rebuilding Puerto Rico sustainably focusing on the areas of environment, eco-agriculture and children’s mental health and education.The vessel will also retrieve plastics and raw materials off the island, alleviating the pressure from Puerto Rico’s over-flowing landfills. The campaign is set to launch mid-December and continue into 2018.“Taino Spirit Promise will identify disrupters & change makers in Puerto Rico to empower them by bringing long term aid & assistance,” said Michelle Rodriguez , whose father is Puerto Rican and who spent many summers during her formative years on the island.“In this era of climate change Sea Shepherd stands ready to assist the good and resilient people of Puerto Rico in their recovery from these destructive events,” said Sea Shepherd founder, President and C.E.O. Captain Paul Watson.Taino Warriors (TainoWarriors.org) is a Hollywood-based non-profit led by industry leaders whose mission is to support Puerto Ricans who are empowering underserved communities in the areas of environment, eco-agriculture and children’s education and mental health, with innovative and sustainable tools and solutions.“The indelible Taino spirit that lives in every Puerto Rican on the island and in the diaspora commands us to come together to help rebuild Puerto Rico” said Puerto Rican-born Ivette Rodriguez, who founded Taino Warriors. “We want to empower the younger generations and remind them of the greatness of their origins. We are thrilled that Michelle Rodriguez (no relation) and Captain Paul Watson are joining us on this mission.”Operation Taino Warrior Promise follows Sea Shepherd’s recent Hurricane Irma and Maria relief campaign, Operation Good Pirates of the Caribbean, which involved the islands of Curacao, Martinique, Dominica, St. Lucia, Guadeloupe, Antigua, Saint Maarten, the British Virgin Islands, St. Barts and St. Croix.Rodriguez – best known for her role as Letty Ortiz in the blockbuster franchise The Fast and the Furious – is a long-time Sea Shepherd supporter. In March of this year, she took part in Operation Ice Watch, a female survey team who documented the effects of climate change and the disappearing ice floes in Canada, leading to the extinction of Canadian seals.last_img read more

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Jif Peanut Butter Teams Up With Hilary Duff For The Imagine If

first_imgKids’ imaginations are endless ­­- full of optimism and ideas that can help make the world a better place. Jif knows great things happen when you nourish kids’ potential and fuel their imaginations.That’s why Jif, in partnership with Boys & Girls Clubs of America and mom and actress Hilary Duff, is excited to announce the return of the ‘Imagine If, With Jif’ contest in 2018. The contest is dedicated to supporting kids’ entrepreneurial and creative ideas by providing grants to families and chapters for the opportunity to spread more love into the world.“As a soon-to-be mom of two, I know how important it is to nourish and celebrate the potential of children,” said Hilary Duff. “It’s truly amazing what kids’ imaginations can uncover when we give them the confidence and resources they need to pursue their dreams, both big and small. I am so lucky to be a part of this contest because I’m truly amazed by what this program accomplished in its first year, and can’t wait to see the bright ideas from children across the country again this year.”Starting today through October 1, 2018, families will be able to submit their entrepreneurial ideas to help make the world a better place on jif.com/imagine-if. The finalist ideas will be selected in October based on creativity, originality, project feasibility, and alignment with the Jif brand’s mission to empower parents and kids to make the world a better place and nourish the potential that lives within us all (see Official Rules for complete details). The public can vote on their favorite ideas from October 16 – 29 before a grand prize winner will be announced in November to receive $15,000 from Jif to help turn their idea into reality.“Boys & Girls Clubs offer a place for young people to become who they were meant to be, with opportunities and experiences that can shape a lifetime of success,” said Jim Clark, president and CEO of Boys & Girls Clubs of America. “The ‘Imagine If, With Jif’ contest aligns perfectly with our mission, by encouraging children to be creative and impactful. We are excited to continue fueling the potential of the next generation by giving them the opportunity to make their dreams reality.”In its first year, the ‘Imagine If, With Jif’ contest named eight-year-old Charlotte Gould as the grand prize winner. Charlotte’s nonprofit, “Stitches by Charlotte” creates personalized dolls for children undergoing medical procedures, and proves that great things happen when we support kids’ creative ideas. This young entrepreneur continues to pursue her dreams of making the world a better place, as she recently announced a brand-new line of surgery companion dolls.last_img read more

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Its going to be honest Jessie Reyez discusses inspiration music ahead of

first_img— This interview has been edited and condensed.By: David Friend – The Canadian Press But that doesn’t mean Reyez isn’t craving recognition. Reyez: That’s definitely my goal… but I’m still a rookie. That’s why I’m trying to do this for the long haul. I’m trying to think of the 10-year plan and the calibre of music I need to make. I’ve been lucky enough to work with a lot of dope musicians. Any time I’m in a (recording) session, I try to walk in like a sponge and take notes, learn and try to get better. Reyez: It was a real story of something that happened to me, so it didn’t really hit me until after (the song was finished). I didn’t even think (of the impact it could have) until me and the producer were done and he was like, “This is crazy.” It messed me up more when we were in meetings and we’d play it. You’d see visceral reactions. You would see some girls just go tense and their eyes tear up because they see themselves in that situation and they went through it. “The last thing I want to do is get too happy,” the fiery 27-year-old musician said of her four nominations — a tally matched only by rockers Arcade Fire this year. VANCOUVER — Jessie Reyez is a leading contender heading into this weekend’s Junos, but the breakout singer says she’s not letting the awards buzz go to her head. The Toronto-raised performer with Colombian roots says she’s excited about her Juno nods and what lies ahead this year. She’s in the running for best R&B/soul recording, best music video, breakthrough artist of the year and the Juno Fan Choice award. Login/Register With: Advertisement Reyez will also perform her single “Figures” on Sunday’s Junos broadcast airing live on CBC. Other nominated acts slated to play include fellow Toronto newcomer Daniel Caesar, Diana Krall, Arkells and Lights. The show at Vancouver’s Rogers Arena will be hosted by pop crooner Michael Buble. The telecast caps off a weekend of accolades for Canadian music, starting at the Juno Awards gala dinner on Saturday where most trophies are handed out. The event will be streamed on the CBC Music website. CP: You have a reputation for laying your emotions bare on the stage, sometimes even bringing yourself to tears when you sing. How do you consistently deliver these raw performances? Reyez: The stories in the songs come from my real life. And it’s kind of like, ah man, at the risk of sounding cheesy, it’s kind of like a wound, like a cut. People want to get over things, so (they) move forward and don’t think about it, but when you make a song, it’s there forever. If you go back to it, and get lost in it, it’s like digging your finger into that cut. I wouldn’t be human if I didn’t cringe when I put my finger in a cut. Facebook CP: You’ve mentioned previously that one of your aspirations is having a shelf of Grammys. That’s pretty ambitious out of the gate. Advertisementcenter_img CP: You’ve been secretive about the status of your debut full-length album, saying you’re a perfectionist and it’ll see the light of day “when God wants.” What’s the hold-up? CP: One trait that stands out about your personality is this determined trajectory you’ve set yourself on. What’s your mantra? CP: You’re coming off a steady run of tour dates but this Junos performance is among your first on a big-time awards show. What’s going through your mind as you prepare? Reyez: A lot of people don’t know me, and for a lot of people this will be their first time hearing me. So it’s going to be me trying to make that moment as potent as possible. Not a lot of embellishments. It’s going to be honest. It’s going to be me. CP: Some of your fellow Toronto hip hop artists have shunned big awards shows like the Grammys and Junos in recent years under the belief they don’t give the music genre its due. (Drake and the performers on his OVO Sound label chose not to submit their work to the Junos for consideration this year and the rapper has famously shunned the Grammys.) Why have you decided to set your sights on these trophies? Reyez: I know (there’s talk) about how a lot people of colour don’t get recognized, a lot of hip hop music doesn’t get recognized. For me, I try to always look at the positive. If I get to hold that (Grammy) one day, I can say, “OK, dope. This little chick that was born in… Toronto, this little Colombiana woman of colour, a minority female, did it.” I want to be able to say that so my two little nieces can feel like they can do anything. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Reyez: “You only lose when you quit.” It’s crazy, eh? All those cliches you hear in school and kind of brush off —because they seem to lose potency — are the keys to life. I wish more kids knew that. Reyez: I want it to be great. I want it to be something that I’m proud of in 10 years. I want it to be something that, if I’m lucky enough to have kids they’ll be like, “Yo, remember when mom made this?” You know what I mean? I want there to be pride in it, my parents to be proud of it. I want accolades. Reyez spoke to The Canadian Press about making her first impression on Junos viewers, and why she’s still chasing awards, even if Canada’s biggest hip hop acts refuse to submit their work for consideration to some awards shows. “I feel like it’s dangerous to get complacent and celebrate too much… You can’t get comfortable.” CP: The song “Gatekeeper,” from your debut EP “Kiddo” released early last year, felt especially potent in the wake of the #MeToo movement. It’s a vivid retelling of your experience with a powerful music industry player who tried to pressure you into sex with promises of fame. What’s it like seeing that song take on greater significance amid conversations about sexual misconduct in the entertainment industry? Advertisement Twitterlast_img read more

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Torontos Director X brings blaxploitation classic Super Fly into 2018

first_imgDirector X, far right, director of the upcoming film Superfly, discusses the film onstage with cast members, from left, Jason Mitchell, Lex Scott Davis and Trevor Jackson during the Sony Pictures Entertainment presentation at CinemaCon 2018, the official convention of the National Association of Theatre Owners, at Caesars Palace on Monday, April 23, 2018, in Las Vegas. (CHRIS PIZZELLO / CHRIS PIZZELLO/INVISION/AP) Login/Register With: Advertisement Advertisement Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Facebook LOS ANGELES—In a nondescript room on the mammoth Sony Pictures lot, music video veteran-turned-filmmaker Director X edits a semi-finalized version of the upcoming Superfly remake, chicken salad in hand.The film, which will be screened before a small audience of friends and family the following day, is undergoing a last-minute cleanup before it’s scheduled to be shown to studio heads in its entirety for the first time.When asked whether the version of the film being edited today will be the same one theatregoers see upon the film’s June 15 release, the director, born Julien Christian Lutz in Toronto, laughed good-naturedly. “It all depends on Monday,” he said. “But this is what we’re presenting.” Superfly, which stars Grown-ish actor Trevor Jackson as the titular drug dealer, is a highly stylized action flick that truly pushes the limits of its R rating. News first broke that the film would go into production in January. After less than 40 days of shooting, it will open just in time for summer blockbuster season — a super-fast turnaround compared with the Hollywood standard.“It was not a lot of time to get this together,” X admitted. “But I tell my guys, ‘All those jobs where you had all the prep time you needed and time to get it right, this ain’t that job. All those jobs prepared you for this job.’ When they say, ‘Smooth seas don’t make experienced sailors,’ this was not a smooth sea.” As for the director himself, “I’m born from chaos filmmaking,” he said. “So it didn’t bother me a bit.” Twitterlast_img read more

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Fire forces hundreds from homes in northern Saskatchewan

first_imgAPTN National NewsAbout 500 residents from the communities of Sikichu and Hall Lake in northern Saskatchewan have been forced to flee their homes after a lightning strike ignited a forest fire.Hall Lake is one of six communities that forms the Lac La Ronge Indian Band.The blaze was about one kilometre away from the community when people were forced to leave.Community members are staying in the nearby town of La Ronge.There is no word on when they will return home.last_img

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Monumental court victory for longstruggling Grassy Narrows

first_imgAPTN National NewsGrassy Narrows First Nation in Ontario has won a victory in an Ontario Court.For years the First Nation has been battling the province to stop logging and mining companies from trespassing in its treaty area.APTN National News reporter Candace Maracle has this story.last_img

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Changes coming to Fisheries Act will impact Northwest Territories economy

first_imgAPTN National NewsAn internal Conservative document leaked late last month reveals that major changes may be coming to the Fisheries Act, including the removal of many habitat protections.In the Northwest Territories, fishing is a way of life, and as APTN National News reporter Cullen Crozier tells us, these changes could have a huge impact on the way life is lived in the territory.last_img

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Social media revolutionizing AFN campaign

first_imgAPTN National NewsMany of the AFN candidates are relying on new and innovative tools to reach supporters.Social media websites have captured the imaginations of candidates and their supporters alike.APTN National News reporter Ossie Michelin has this story.last_img

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Families react to final report of the TRC

first_imgAPTN National NewsFamilies make up the bulk of the evidence provided to the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.Their stories are painful, and in many cases, told for the first time.APTN’s Annette Francis talked to some of the families who were at the release of the final report.afrancis@aptn.caFollow @aptnafrancislast_img

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RCMP Inuvik call in outside police force to investigate after woman dies

first_imgIman Kassam APTN National NewsINUVIK — RCMP in Inuvik have called in an Alberta police force to investigate after a woman died while being released from custody Sunday.The woman, whose name has not yet been released, was arrested the night before for public intoxication.According to a release issued Wednesday by the RCMP,  police received a complaint January 9 about a woman believed to be intoxicated walking along Bonnetplume Road in Inuvik.Police said she was “arrested without incident.”According to police, she was brought to the hospital for a medical assessment where “she was considered fit for incarceration by the medical staff.”The woman was then locked in a cell until she was considered sober enough to be released.The following morning, “the female prisoner was in the process of being released from custody when she unexpectedly went into medical distress,” said the release.“RCMP administered first aid on scene and subsequently the female was escorted to the Inuvik Hospital where she was treated by medical staff. She unfortunately passed away.”According to the release, the woman “was co-operative with police throughout her arrest and time in custody.”What is not clear is what happened during her incarceration or how she died.The case has now been turned over to the Medicine Hat Police Services who are conducting an external review of the circumstances related to her death.Staff Sgt. Trevor Humphries told APTN National News that two investigators were dispatched to Inuvik Monday.“The members that were sent were our active members of major crimes,” said Humphries. “So we’re talking about members that are very senior, they’ve very experienced, skilled members that are sent to assist the RCMP and conduct this external review.”Sgt. Ernie Fischhofer and Cst. Jason Ross from Medicine Hat Police Services will be in Inuvik investigating the woman’s death until Thursday, at which point they will return home to start working on a report.Police said it will take several months for the report to be completed.Humphries said a key component of the review will come from the medical examiner’s report.“Autopsies are done quickly, but the final report often times takes several months because toxicology has to be done, and that does not get done overnight, it takes time,” he said.ikassam@aptn.calast_img read more

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Family says Saskatchewan hospitals refusal to immediately treat deaf mute Cree man

first_imgJorge Barrera APTN National NewsA 75-year-old deaf and mute man from Onion Lake Cree Nation died Monday in a Saskatchewan hospital that initially refused to give him immediate care because his health card had expired, according to a family member.Rene Whitstone died at 12:50 p.m. local time at the Lloydminster, Sask., hospital. He had been unresponsive for about 24 hours and had not eaten solid food since last Thursday.“I can’t describe how I’m feeling, lots of things going through my mind,” said nephew Grant Whitstone. “I am saddened by the loss. He was a very, very cool guy.”Whitstone said he believes his uncle Rene Whitstone may still be alive if he had received immediate medical care after he arrived at the hospital in an ambulance last Tuesday. The frail man had been found on the floor of his home by a family member who called the ambulance.“He would have had a better chance at life in my mind,” said Grant Whitstone. “It’s discrimination, racism, you name it…I had to pay cash before they even looked at him.”Whitstone said he was forced to pay $100 cash before hospital staff would administer the initial blood work and X-rays for his ailing uncle.“In any emergency situation, the priority should be to take care of the patient whatever type of emergency it is and in this case they failed to do that,” he said.Following the blood work and X-rays, Whitstone says hospital staff, including doctors, would not administer any further medical care for his uncle until his health card was finally renewed over six hours after the ailing man first arrived at the hospital.“They said, no, we want to make sure these are taken care of first before they proceed,” said Whitstone.Whitstone said he contacted Onion Lake Cree Nation’s health director who told the hospital any medical expenses would be guaranteed by the band. That wasn’t good enough, said Whitstone.Onion Lake Cree Nation health director Albert Jimmy said the incident caused him great concern.“I was told they wouldn’t examine or treat him before the validation (of the health card) came through,” said Jimmy. “All Saskatchewan people are supposed to be taken care of and it happens sometimes that elders, they overlook the sticker that is mailed to renew their card and this must have happened. This person has a disability, he doesn’t hear and can’t talk and never went to school.” Grant Whitstone says his uncle Rene Whitstone may still be alive if hospital had given him immediate health care. Photo courtesy of Grant Whitstone.Marge Nicholson, quality of care coordinator with the Prairie North Health Region, which oversees the hospital, said she doesn’t believe anything was done wrong after her initial review of the case.“As far as I can see, it has been a whole misunderstanding of what was done in emergency. He did not go straight up to a ward, but they did look after him in the emergency,” said Nicholson. “He got very good care.”Nicholson said Rene Whitstone was given a bath by nursing staff before his health card was processed.Grant Whitstone said this is not true. He said his uncle was only given a bath and put on IV after the health card issue was settled.“That is absolutely false, they didn’t even proceed to move on anything until that health card was approved,” he said. “They brought him in, they put him in the standard emergency room and then they told my aunty to take him to register him and that is when the administrator said at the registry that they couldn’t tend to him because his health card expired.”Whitstone said he has filed a complaint with the hospital and he plans to file additional complaints with the Saskatchewan medical association and with the health ministry.He is scheduled to meet with Nicholson on Wednesday.Whitstone said his uncle, who had a trap line north of Onion Lake, was a traditional man who did not trust Western medicine.“He was just a simple man living a simple life, you know,” said Whitstone.The Lloydminster hospital also serves Alberta residents because the community straddles the provincial boundary.Onion Lake sits about 50 kilometres north of Lloydminster.jbarrera@atpn.ca@JorgeBarreralast_img read more

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Yukon First Nation man thrilled with Canadas new transgender legislation

first_imgShirley McLean APTN National NewsA Yukon First Nation man is thrilled with Canada’s new Law protecting the rights of transgender people.And he hopes the Yukon will get with the times in how people identify their gender on identification documents.smclean@aptn.calast_img

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Gas company files injunction to remove Mikmaw from land

first_imgamoore@aptn.ca@angelharksen Angel MooreAPTN NewsAlton Gas has filed an injunction to remove water protectors camped at its work site since 2017.The company wants to store natural gas in underground caverns, which would mean releasing salty brine every day into the Sipekne’katik River.The protectors say this will permanently damage the river and are concerned environmental regulations will not be met. They also say it is a violation of the Fisheries Act to release a deleterious substance into the river where the fish will be harmed.Water protector Michell Paul says they are holding Alton Gas accountable.“The law itself was not followed, so how can you petition to the courts to pursue a law against us, when we’re just doing what we are supposed to be doing?” said Paul.The lawyer for Alton Gas, Robert Grant, was not available to comment at the hearing.In court, he said the company was following all regulations and procedures and the injunction was about trespassing.He said employees’ safety was threatened at the project site by protesters using profanity and being aggressive.As a result, he said Alton Gas had no choice but to file an injunction to ensure workers’ safety and access.The protectors say they are peaceful and have never threatened any of the workers.Historical significanceThey say they are protecting a river that is historically significant, has been traditionally fished and used as a transportation route for generations.Doreen Bernard is one of the grassroots grandmothers opposed to the project. She hopes regulations will be enforced to protect the environment.But in the meantime, she says they are following traditional law.“We are not trespassers on our own land. This is unceded Mi’kma’ki and we have to protect the waters,” she said.Treaty rights were also challenged by Grant. He said rights cannot be upheld by individuals.But the protector’s lawyer, James Klaassen, said treaty rights were being exercised on behalf of the community.“They are doing it on behalf of the collective and asked to do so by the collective,” said Klassen, “and so, in that sense, they do have a right and an ability and in this case a duty to do it.”The protectors are hopeful the court will consider treaty laws.“We look forward to the next court date and …asserting our treaty and title on the Sipekne’katik River,” said Paul.The judge’s decision is expected next week.last_img read more

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UK demand fuels 46 rise in exports of Canadian wood pellets NEB

first_imgCALGARY – The National Energy Board says exports of Canadian wood pellets to be burned as biomass fuel jumped by 46 per cent in 2016 as demand soared in the United Kingdom.The federal agency says Canada exported 2.4 billion kilograms in 2016, making it the second-largest exporter by weight after the United States. About 70 per cent was shipped to the U.K. and 11 per cent to Japan.The Canadian industry has grown by 73 per cent over the past four years, the NEB says. About 65 per cent of Canada’s pellets are produced in British Columbia.In July, Tokyo-based Sumitomo Corp. paid an undisclosed amount to buy a 48-per-cent stake in B.C. pellet maker Pacific BioEnergy Corp. to ensure a supply for its power plants in Japan.Wood pellets are made from forest industry waste such as bark and sawdust and are considered a renewable energy resource that’s easier to burn than solid wood.The NEB says the rise in demand is linked to decisions around the world to phase out coal.last_img read more

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Insurance coverage concerns may leave Ubers expansion to Winnipeg at curb

first_imgWINNIPEG – The ride-hailing company Uber is considering giving Winnipeg a pass over concerns about insurance rates its drivers may have to pay to operate.In a submission to Manitoba’s Public Utilities Board, Manitoba Public Insurance is proposing four different rate options that would see Uber drivers pay five per cent above their all-purpose coverage.The provincially owned insurance company says the rate model is fair, gives drivers choice and prevents other vehicle owners from subsidizing Uber vehicles.But Uber argues such a policy could be cost prohibitive for some drivers and says unless a blanket insurance model is chosen it won’t offer its service in Winnipeg.The city and provincial government have previously paved the way for ride-hailing companies to start March 1, 2018.The city’s cab industry has been critical of the decision, saying Uber drivers will pay lower rates and create an unfair playing field.MPI’s proposal says rates for ride-hailing drivers would be different depending on the time of day the operator wants to pick up passengers, or whether it’s on a weekday or weekend.Uber’s submission to the utilities board says those time bands could be cost prohibitive for drivers who work part-time only.“Based on the deficiencies in the MPI proposed product versus the type of insurance that is available to ridesharing companies in cities across North America, Uber will, unfortunately, be unable to consider expansion of services to Winnipeg on March 1, 2018.” wrote the company.Uber rival, Lyft, said in a statement to CTV that it also has serious concerns about the insurance proposal.“We don’t believe it would allow true ridesharing to operate in the province. We look forward to continuing to work with the Manitoba Public Insurance Corporation to find a way forward that expands Manitobans’ access to affordable, reliable transportation options like Lyft.”MPI, in a statement to the same network, said the proposed insurance rates for private vehicle-for-hire operators is consistent with other jurisdictions.“The proposed insurance model ensures that vehicle-for-hire operators are insured in a separate insurance class that will prevent cross-subsidization of loss experience with other major vehicle classes. Under the model, there is flexibility for vehicle-for-hire operators to select specific time bands in which they intend to provide for-hire services,” said the Crown insurer.Manitoba Opposition NDP Leader Wab Kinew, who has backed the cab industry and its concerns, said MPI’s rate application is reasonable.“It seems a little surprising that Uber is saying things aren’t fair when they’re being offered the chance to operate in Manitoba for something like 25 per cent of what the taxi industry has to pay to do business here.”A board decision on MPI’s application is expected Monday. (CTV Winnipeg)last_img read more

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Kellogg latest US brand to ditch crisiswracked Venezuela

first_imgMARACAY, Venezuela – Kellogg Co. closed operations in Venezuela and laid off 300 workers Tuesday at a time of widespread hunger in the crisis-wracked South American nation.The Battle Creek, Michigan-based company said in a statement that it ceased operations as a result of the “current economic and social deterioration” in Venezuela.The move drew an angry rebuke from socialist President Nicolas Maduro, who accused the company of trying to sabotage his chances of getting re-elected in Sunday’s presidential vote. He said he had ordered the company’s plant in the central city of Maracay to be turned over to Kellogg’s workers so they can continue to produce cereals.“Why are they doing it today? Because we are four days away from elections and they think it will spook the people,” Maduro said at a campaign rally, adding that he would seek the international arrest of the owners of Kellogg’s Venezuelan subsidiary. “Imperialists! Oligarchs! Nobody can scare our people.”Workers arriving Tuesday for the early shift at Kellogg’s factory in Maracay were surprised to find a notice taped to an iron gate informing them the company had been forced to shutter the plant. As news of the layoffs spread, Venezuela’s labour minister showed up to speak with the workers.The factory, with a giant figure of Tony the Tiger lording over the entrance, produces 75 per cent of the breakfast cereals consumed by Venezuelans, according to the company’s website. A spokeswoman for Kellogg’s said its market share was lower than 75 per cent but declined to say by how much.Omar Rodriguez, who had spent 26 years working at Kellogg’s, said he didn’t know how he would feed his three children without his job.“It’s going to be a tough blow,” Rodriguez said, expressing anger that the company had decided to let go of its workforce in such an impersonal manner. “What am I going to bring home? Nothing.”The company said it looks forward to resuming operations once conditions improve. The company has been producing cereal in Venezuela since 1961 and the market had at one point been its biggest in Latin America after Mexico, although in 2016 it deconsolidated its Venezuela business from the company’s overall earnings results.Kellogg’s joins multinationals including Bridgestone, Kimberly-Clark and General Mills that have closed or reduced operations in Venezuela amid hyperinflation, shortages and a recession deeper than the Great Depression of the 1930s.last_img read more

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Hearing on Brexit opens at EUs highest court

first_imgBRUSSELS — The European Union’s highest court is hearing arguments on whether Britain could unilaterally revoke its decision to leave the EU ahead of its planned exit date of March 29.The European Court of Justice on Tuesday opened the session, which will assess the issue under an accelerated procedure due to the urgency of Brexit.Since Article 50 of the EU treaty of Lisbon dealing with the issue is scant on details — because it was expected that no member state would want to leave — a group of Scottish legislators want to know to what extend the U.K. can pull out of the withdrawal procedure on its own, amid increasing pressure from Brexit opponents for a second referendum on the decision to leave.The court decision could take several months.The Associated Presslast_img

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German leader Merkel heads to Athens demonstrations banned

first_imgATHENS, Greece — Authorities have banned demonstrations in a large section of central Athens and will shut down streets and subway stations during a visit by German Chancellor Angela Merkel, who arrives in the Greek capital Thursday afternoon for meetings with Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras and other officials.Around 2,000 officers, a police helicopter and drones will be deployed for the visit, which ends Friday afternoon.Germany was the largest single contributor to the three international bailout packages Greece received since 2010 as it struggled through a dramatic financial crisis which almost saw it crash out of the eurozone. Germany was also seen as one of the main enforcers of the stringent austerity measures, including tax hikes and pension and salary cuts, imposed in return for the rescue loans.The Associated Presslast_img read more

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Citigroup adjusted profits rise by 9 per cent beats estimate

first_imgNEW YORK — Citigroup is reporting its profits rose by 9 per cent on an adjusted basis from a year earlier, helped by a lower tax rate and a reduction in expenses.Citi said Monday it earned $4.31 billion in the last three months of 2018, or a profit of $1.64 per share.That compares to the fourth quarter of 2017, when Citi reported an $18.89 billion net loss. The loss was mostly an accounting adjustment, caused by the impact of the then-new tax law which required Citi to write off billions of dollars of what are known as tax-deferred assets.The results beat analysts’ estimates, who were looking for Citi to earn $1.55 per share, according to a survey of analysts by FactSet.Ken Sweet, The Associated Presslast_img

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Ackerman says taking bull by the horns helped city rise in best

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Mayor Lori Ackerman woke up on Tuesday to see the Energetic City climb 145 spots since last year on Money Sense magazine’s best places to live in Canada.Ackerman explained that when she found out that Fort St. John was ranked the best place to live in B.C. and 15th best in Canada she was ecstatic.“To see that Fort St. John has made this significant standing as the number 15 in Canada and number one in B.C. place to live is pretty phenomenal,” said Ackerman. Ackerman added that much of the city’s improvement has been due to city council taking the bull by the horns in ways of recruiting more workers and listening to resident feedback.“We’ve done a lot of public consultation over the last decade. We have listened to what the people have wanted and quite often over different council meetings we have gone to the public and asked ‘what do you want?’”Ackerman mentioned that they have focused heavily on community economic development because when there is a beautiful community, the economic development will develop itself. Making sure cores services stay maintained such as water, sewers and lights was a key point for the city.“We have to continue to demonstrate leadership and environmental responsibility. We are on the world stage with our passive house and to be able to showcase Fort St. John for just that one amenity is significant.”Ackerman went on to say that the city would soon unveil a community plan to focus on the community’s vision and work hard on making the city even more livable in the winter.last_img read more

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