Man Accused Of Arson In Fire That Destroyed A Falconer Home

first_imgImage via Falconer Fire Department / Facebook.FALCONER – A Village of Falconer man was charged with arson in connection with a fire that destroyed a family’s home over the weekend on Pearl Street.Town of Ellicott Police say Cody Dustin, 24, is charged with third-degree arson.The Chautauqua County Fire Investigation Team ruled the cause of the fire was “incendiary.”Through investigation, Ellicott Police Detectives alleged that Dustin started the fire. Dustin was issued an appearance ticket to return to the Town of Ellicott Court at a later date. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img

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Cuomo Says Schools Will Remain Closed For Rest Of Academic Year

first_imgNew York State Image.ALBANY – Governor Andrew Cuomo announced during his daily update Friday that all public schools throughout New York State will remain closed for the remainder of the 2019-20 school year. Cuomo also says that facilities will continue to provide distance learning for the remainder of the year.WNYNewsNow will continue to cover the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, putting facts over fear.  Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img

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Rock Eagle Garden

first_imgAt Rock Eagle 4-H Center, Georgia students can get hands-on learning about pioneer life. Students pump water from a well, wash clothes on a washboard and gain an appreciation for modern day life. This year they planted vegetables that were served in the center’s dining hall.Living history is taught at the center’s Scott Site, which includes a pioneer house, a well and hand-pump, a functioning smokehouse and a privy. Environmental educators teach students the typical chores of a pioneer family.Planting with primitive toolsWith the addition of the garden, students can now be taught how to use pioneer tools to plant seeds and learn how to water and tend a garden. “Students may not become commercial farmers, but they might grow tomatoes at home one day,” said Matt Hammons, coordinator of Rock Eagle’s environmental education program. “We’d like to connect them to University of Georgia Extension and the help available from their county agent. As students learn to grow fresh food, they are able to improve their diet while providing for themselves a little more economically when they are adults.”Hammons also hopes students learn that produce comes from the ground, not a supermarket. “I want them to understand that you have a season for plants; that you can’t grow tomatoes year round in Georgia, even though you can get them year round in the grocery store,” he said.A little help from friendsLast fall, Hammons and the other environmental educators planted cover crops on the garden site to add nitrogen to the soil. Just like in pioneer days, no fertilizers or pesticides are used. The garden’s soil is amended with compost from Rock Eagle and from the student-run UGArden on the University of Georgia campus in Athens. “We partnered with the UGArden staff, and they shared some resources and expertise with us on how we could implement gardening practices and get the kids in the garden,” he said. “They gave us some compost, starter plants and their time to help us get our feet off the ground.”Plants don’t produce vegetables overnight. Students that came to the outdoor classroom last spring cared for the garden, but when the vegetables were ready to harvest, the students were on summer break. Rock Eagle’s environmental educators harvested the vegetables.Older varieties plantedWatermelons, okra, squash, cucumbers, beans, peppers and tomatoes were grown. When available, heirloom plant varieties were used. “We planted heritage crops like Brandywine and Cherokee Purple tomatoes and Sugar Baby watermelons,” said Laura Kent, education program specialist at Rock Eagle 4-H Center. Kent oversees the daily operations of the garden. “Using the garden to teach students and to provide fresh, local produce to the dining hall is extremely exciting. It allows Rock Eagle to connect students to agriculture, which is the foundation of 4-H, as well as contribute sustainable resources to the center,” Kent said.Too much of a good thingThanks to the Scott Site garden, Rock Eagle Food Operations Manager Sandra Gilley didn’t have to purchase cucumbers or cherry tomatoes for a month. “We were pleasantly surprised by the amount of produce they brought us,” Gilley said. “I didn’t think we would get such a big quantity, and all the tomatoes came in at one time.”Over the summer season, just less than 174 pounds of cherry tomatoes and 64 pounds of large tomatoes were delivered to the dining hall. Having too many tomatoes was a problem for only a few minutes. Gilley and her staff quickly used them on the salad bar, pickled them and also made some new tomato-based dishes they froze. “Now, we’ll be able to enjoy the fruits of the garden this winter,” she said.Tasting new, unusual produceThe odd colors of the heritage tomatoes actually encouraged Rock Eagle summer campers to try them. “Cherokee tomatoes are dark purple. The children really liked that, and the cherry tomatoes they brought us were yellow and light red,” Gilley said. “The colors seem to make the kids want to try something new.”The dining hall guests consumed more than 222 pounds of cucumbers, 21 pounds of okra, 18 pounds of peppers, 9 pound of beans, 79 pounds of squash and nine watermelons. Gilley said finding local produce for the dining hall is often a challenge. “The garden helped us meet the challenge and helped us include as many fruits and vegetables as we could,” she said.The abundance of squash was used in the fresh salad bar, casseroles and veggie trays. “We really saw an increase in interest in the salad bar because of the produce from the garden. Sometimes the kids will look at a new food item, but not take it,” Gilley said. “When you are paying retail price, it makes it cost prohibitive to try new dishes and experiment with new recipes.”The garden didn’t produce enough watermelons to replace all the fruit needed in the dining hall, but it did supplement the other Georgia grown produce Gilley orders. Produce from the garden was also used for Rock Eagle off-site catering events.Additions in the future“We’ve really enjoyed getting all the free, fresh produce. We only partook of all of the labor the EE staff put into growing the garden,” she said. “It has also created some camaraderie and some synergy on site with the staff.”Hammon hopes to add a small garden site behind the dining hall for convenience. The Scott Site garden is a short hike from the main 4-H center. In the future, sorghum may also be planted and processed in a working sorghum mill on the site. Kent also hopes to expand the garden by planting nontraditional and traditional plants. “I want the kids to see a diversity of plants,” she said.This year’s harvest was plentiful compared to last year’s, which was devoured by wildlife early in the season. A temporary fence kept the deer away this year, however, and plans are in the works to install a cedar split rail fence customary of the time period.“We haven’t knocked it out of the park yet, but we will. We want to integrate other parts of agriculture into the garden as well as Master Gardeners, 4-H clubs and the community,” Hammons said. “We’d like to become a teaching garden and even work with the local high school students.”The environmental education program was implemented at Rock Eagle in 1979. It was later expanded to include four other 4-H centers across the state. The five centers currently serve more than 40,000 students annually, making it the largest residential program of its kind in the nation. As of spring 2014, the Georgia 4-H environmental education program has served more than 1 million participants. The program has been designated a state and national learning model, drawing students and teachers from more than 500 schools and six southeastern states.last_img read more

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Governor Douglas’ Budget Address

first_imgI am recommending a 4.5 percent increase for the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board. The efforts of VHCB,in concert with our strong network of housing providers, are critical to creating homes for low and moderate incomeVermonters. *** THE VERMONT WAY FORWARDA Responsibility for Affordability We must continue to make health care more affordable for every Vermonter. To this end, my budget continues ourcommitment to full and successful implementation of Catamount Health as well as our long-term efforts to saveMedicaid and reduce the cost-shift on those already insured. Mr. President, Madame Speaker, Members of the General Assembly, fellow Vermonters: At the beginning of each of the last two legislative sessions I offered numerous proposals to bend the trend ofeducation spending increases. I again offer my ideas with the expectation that we take immediate steps, and with theunderstanding that my ideas are not the only ones. The centerpiece of my proposal is a property tax cap that makes our investments in public education sustainable.Unlike Act 60 a law that confounds taxpayers to this day my tax cap is straightforward and reasonable. With a five-year sunset provision, the cap will be in place only as long as it would take to make growth in schoolspending sustainable. The cap could be overridden if 60 percent of local voters pass their school budget and it wouldapply on a year-to-year budgetary basis or on a per-pupil spending basis so those few schools with growingpopulations wouldnt be penalized. More than 40 other states have similar caps. Moreover, recent experience here in Vermont demonstrates theireffectiveness. In 2004, the Legislatures own Education Cost Containment Study Committee reported growth inspecial education spending was cut nearly in half after the implementation of a cap. For too many years, the tax system born from Act 60 has been filled with fine print that shelters the very rich andpunishes those who have worked to keep their family home. I am asking again that the Legislature establish a meanstest to protect Vermonters, like our senior citizens, who own homes but have modest incomes. And I am challengingthis assembly to further close those loopholes that allow the owners of million dollar homes to receive governmentassistance checks and avoid paying their fair share. As we work to provide property tax relief, we cannot shift this burden to another tax. Shifting this expense to anothertax would require you to increase that new education tax year after year, just to keep pace with the current rate ofspending increases. The good health and peace of mind provided by health insurance is only one element of helping Vermonters succeed.Education is another key component. Recently, our Next Generation Commission made several thoughtful and forward-thinking recommendations to helpus transform our education and job training networks. My budget provides the $7 million recommended by the commission: $3 million for scholarships, $2 million for loanforgiveness and $2 million for workforce training. And I have proposed to fund these programs entirely throughGeneral Fund revenues. *** Coupled with this budget are essential elements of the Affordability Agenda: my plan to cap property taxes, reducehealth care costs and make homeownership and higher education more affordable. The Affordability Agenda is essential to our immediate economic success and a prerequisite to achieving the goals ofThe Vermont Way Forward. If working Vermonters cannot afford to live in our state, and if high costs and lack ofopportunity force their children and grandchildren away, we have failed to protect Vermont and our way of life. *** The strength and affordability of our institutions of higher learning are central to the success of this proposal. So toois the quality of our primary and secondary education system. Its no secret that American children are outperformed by their peers in other nations in academic areas essential tofuture economic successmath, science and technology. That is why I proposed the creation of Robert T. Stafford Schools. I again want to urge you torenew the charter of the bipartisan Next Generation Commission to study the creation of StaffordSchools and other means to enhance the educational opportunities in these areas. The quality ofour curricula will have a major influence on our future. ***The Vermont Way Forward requires that we strengthen Vermonts brand by continuing to be aleading environmental steward. To build on the many environmental initiatives already underway, I have offered several keysteps to encourage the expansion of the bio-fuels market and I look forward to the proposals ofthis Legislature. This budget includes nearly $2 million to fund a 16 percent reduction of the tax on fuel-efficientand hybrid vehicles, a tax rate reduction on bio-diesel for individuals and businesses that use itfor transportation, and a tax incentive that will make bio-fuels as affordable as regular homeheating oil. The infrastructure that we build will form a foundation for economic growth and job creation thatis second to none. This is an unprecedented opportunity to leap far ahead of the leading telecommunicationssystems available today. This is no time for mediocrity. If were serious about making Vermont aleader in the 21st Century economy, we must act now. *** No one has more to gain or lose from preserving the quality of the land, and its ability to producethe food that sustains us, than those who make their living from it: Vermonts farmers. Overall, I am recommending an operating budget for the Agency of Agriculture that increases 8.2percent. I understand that bending the spending curve requires difficult choices and I am open to listening to all of your ideas.In the end, real property tax reform will require that we listen respectfully, but recognize the urgency and take actionthis year. *** *** We must also do more to ensure the equality of the systems we provide for our children. Last year, I asked the Legislature to work with me to improve our foster care system. As you may recall, I hadrecently convened more than 100 foster children in this very chamber. Many of them talked about the abrupttermination of state support on their 18th birthday or upon high school graduationexpressing deep concerns aboutbeing forced from loving homes with no alternatives and limited preparation for life on their own. The lack of an appropriate transitional period results in a disproportionate percentage of these young Vermontersbecoming homeless or incarcerated; and it increases the likelihood that they will become addicted to drugs oralcohol. We must do more to give these Vermonters a better chance for success and a life of independence. At my request, over the last year, several groups came together to plan improvements in this system. Based on theirrecommendations, I have included funding for young Vermonters in foster care to be supported on a voluntary basisup to age 21. This support will be made available if they work or attend educational or vocational training programs.I have also provided funding to support foster children as they transition into the workplace and find housing. I understand how important it is to Vermonts families, and how important it is for the state that every Vermonter beoffered the opportunity to pursue an education beyond high school. That is why scholarships have been thecornerstone of my efforts to make college affordable and encourage our young people to stay here and contribute tothe economic security of Vermont. These limits on budget growth are responsible and long overdue. They will help ensure that we do not press thechallenges of today onto future generations and provide ample opportunity for the strategic and practical investmentsvital to the future of our state. To put homeownership within reach of thousands of hardworking Vermonters I am again proposing initiatives thatwill help create new homes. The concept of my New Neighborhoods initiative is simple: We will build near existingneighborhoods and increase the stock of new housing while respecting the traditional settlement patterns that makeVermont such a unique and wonderful place to live. As long as this new housing is in keeping with the traditionalcharacter of surrounding neighborhoods, and consistent with the plans and desires of the community, these projectswould enjoy streamlined Act 250 approval. As an added incentive, communities that host New Neighborhoodswould receive all taxes generated by the increased grand list value from the new housing for three years. Furthermore, this budget includes $8.6 million of operating funds and capital investments for theClean and Clear Action Plan to improve and protect water quality in the Lake Champlain basinand waterways throughout Vermont. To enhance our efforts, my capital bill includes funding for a wind turbine for the Grand Isle fishhatchery, the completion of a solar project at our Middlesex facilities and $1 million for ageothermal heating system at the Vermont Veterans Home in Bennington. Just as we work to meet our obligation to the property taxpayers who fund education, we must also keep ourcommitments to the men and women who educate our children. My budget provides $40.7 million for the Vermont State Teachers Retirement System and meets the commitmentsmade last year to a new amortization schedule that addresses previous underfunding. *** My budget includes substantial resources for outreach and enrollment to ensure all Vermonters know their optionsand have access to affordable health care coverage. We can be proud that we were the first state in the nation to implement spending controls that have helped saveMedicaid for the most vulnerable. As a result, we have cut the Medicaid deficit by more than $400 million and thereis no projected deficit for fiscal years 2007 or 2008. To reduce the cost shift that occurs when government-funded health care fails to pay its fair share, I have proposednearly $7.3 million to increase the rates Medicaid pays our doctors and hospitals. Preventing costly ailments must remain a key cost containment strategy. I therefore propose continued funding forthe Vermont Blueprint for Health so Vermonters with chronic conditionslike heart disease, cancer anddiabetesget the right care at the right time and at the best possible price. In addition, I have included funding forour new immunization pilot program so Vermonters can access recommended vaccines without worrying about theircost. To reduce expensive, chronic and debilitating diseases associated with no, or limited, dental care, I am proposing acomprehensive package of oral health initiatives totaling $815,000. These programs ensure oral health exams forschool-age children; provide reimbursement rate increases for dentists; and reimburse primary care physicians fororal health risk assessments. *** This past summer, I was very pleased when the Emergency Board approved the $8.9 millionpackage I recommended to assist our farmers through a particularly challenging time of flooding,high fuel costs, and low milk prices. This was an important step, but we have to look beyond theimmediate challenges and make investments that offer these hardworking entrepreneurs morestability and profitability. I am recommending funds for mobile processing units that will provide additional economicopportunities for farmers and speed the delivery of farm-fresh foods to markets in Vermont andelsewhere. Our organic dairy industry continues to grow with over 120 organic dairy farms today and anadditional 80 in the process of transitioning. Vermont is poised to take advantage of the annual25 percent increase in the demand for organic dairy products and the premium price it garners.My budget continues investments we began last year to assist interested farmers in making thetransition. *** Im pleased today to present a responsible, balanced, and compassionate budget. This budget adheres to our long-held devotion to fiscal responsibility and is designed to meet the many competingdemands we face without raising taxes. And it demonstrates my personal commitment to establishing moreresponsible and sustainable increases in spending across all areas of government. I present to you a General Fund budget that grows at only 3.16 percent and a transportation budget that increases at2.6 percent. I also present to you capital appropriations totaling $49.2 million, consistent with the report of theCapital Debt Affordability Advisory Committee. My recommendations do not increase more than inflation plus population growth. Capping growth in state spending at this level is a responsible way to ensure our appropriations do not exceed theability of taxpayers to foot the bill. That is why I begin today by proposing a statutory cap for all General Fund budgets beginning this year. This is apractical and prudent step that will enforce the same discipline on the budget process that taxpayers must use withtheir own family finances. Achieving the prosperity and peace of mind we desire for every generation requires that we act now to provideVermonters with relief from the property tax. I hear it everyday. Vermonters are upset with the growing burden of their property taxes and the unsustainableincreases in spendingand they have every right to be. In the current fiscal year, most property tax bills went up byover seven percent. In some school districts, property tax bills skyrocketed by more than 30 percent. Withoutimmediate action, next year will be as bad, or worse. In addition, I propose we end the practice of including a so-called waterfall section in the General Fund. In recentyears, the waterfall has become like the fabled deli section of the capital bill, once full of earmarks and petprojects. Rather than a waterfall, I propose that any excess funds available at the end of the fiscal year be invested in areserve account for construction of a new state hospital a critical expenditure that will overextend availableresources if we do not plan ahead. I have also proposed that by 2010 Vermont become the nations first e-state the first state tooffer universal access to broadband and wireless technology everywhere within its borders. To spearhead this important effort, I have called for the creation of a VermontTelecommunications Authority that would partner with private enterprise to build a nextgeneration infrastructure. To ensure the Authority has sufficient operating funds in its start-up year, I am recommendingnearly a half-million dollars in this budget. I propose that we more than triple our park maintenance funding to $800,000. And to help meetmy goal of producing 25 percent of our energy from farm or field-based renewable sources by2025, my budget includes $400,000 for farm energy grants. *** Three weeks ago, I presented The Vermont Way Forwarda four-part plan of innovative education, environmentalleadership, technological advancement and job creation. Every Vermonter deserves a safe, affordable home. Unfortunately, too many working Vermonters are unable toafford homes near where they work and are forced to spend time commuting that could be better spent with theirfamilies. High property taxes only serve to exacerbate this problem. *** This is unacceptable to the people of Vermont. That is why we must take immediate steps to moderate unsustainable growth in spending and bring relief toVermonts beleaguered property taxpayersthis year. *** p{ margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1px}body{ font-family: “Arial”, sans-serif; font-size: 12pt; font-weight: normal; font-style: normal}Governors Budget AddressTuesday, January 23, 2007 Being the first e-state requires a state-of-the-art e-government. We have taken some steps to accelerate the development of more electronic government services,like vehicle registrations and fishing licenses. Despite our progress, we remain behind otherstates in the efficient use of technology. That is why my administration is engaged in the Strategic Enterprise Initiativea comprehensiveplan to prepare for, and invest in, more efficient technology systems and workforce training. Thisinitiative will transform state government into a 21st Century operation, increase productivity,eliminate wasteful redundancy and produce a more effective and less costly government. *** With a commitment to affordability, an innovative education system and a state-of-the-arttelecommunications network, we can establish Vermont as a world center for environmentalengineering. Thanks to our long-held environmental ethic, our system of higher education and the frameworkprovided by the Vermont Environmental Consortium and the Green Valley Initiative, our statehas the foundation from which this sector can grow and create more and better paying jobs acrossall levels of our economy. As I noted in my inaugural address, global demand for these services is growingespecially inemerging industrial nations. But we must act now to plant our flag and establish Vermont as theleader we know it can be in this emerging new industry. That is why my recommended funding for the Agency of Commerce includes an additional$300,000 to be used by the new Environmental Engineering Advisory Council to conduct marketresearch, develop marketing materials, make direct appeals and provide assistance to engineeringfirms seeking to locate in Vermont.last_img read more

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Ecuador Sets the Regional Pace in Counter Narcotics River Operations

first_imgBy Dialogo September 12, 2012 The Napo River winds eastbound across the Ecuadorean landscape, from the Central Andes to the Port of Francisco de Orellana, in El Coca, where it joins the Coca River as a major artery to the Amazon River in neighboring Peru. In 1541, Gonzalo Pizarro led an expedition of Spanish conquerors through its waters in search of gold, but found the imposing Amazon Rain Forest instead. Known as Jatunyacu in the region’s Quichua language, it means “Big River”, for a reason: It represents a major life source for the many indigenous cultures that inhabit the area, as well as serves as a major transportation and trade route that extends across the South American continent. Some 50 to 80 kilometers north of its waters, the San Miguel and Putumayo Rivers, which also feed into the Amazon, flow parallel to the Napo, but these two delineate part of the 728-kilometer border between Colombia and Ecuador in a porous area that formerly had little state presence or control. In 2000, in fact, there were less than 2,000 Ecuadorean Military troops operating along the country’s northern region under many commands, according to data gathered by the U.S. Military Group Army Mission in Ecuador. It was a territory where coca plantations thrived and armed camps belonging to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) existed with relative impunity. Its strategic equatorial location by the Pacific Ocean on the west and wedging into two important cocaine producers on the rest of its circumference has made it an attractive transit country for drug traffickers and the myriad illegal activities that derive from this scourge, including transnational organized crime, drug trafficking, environmental damage, and human rights violations. Today, however, that grim picture has changed to much brighter colors. The Ecuadorean Military has strengthened its presence in the area, thanks to an investment of US $3 billion in infrastructure, equipment vehicles, boats, and sustainment of troops in the area by the country’s government. It has since established a force of 11,000 personnel to operate along the northern border, all under the single direction of the Northern Operations Command No. 1 (OPCMD 1N), said U.S. Army Chief Warrant Officer 4 Ricardo Marquez, riverine program manager and watercraft engineer with the U.S. Army Mission in El Coca. During Diálogo’s visit to the 19th “Napo” Jungle Brigade based in El Coca, in August 2012, Brigadier General Celso Andrade, commander of the IV “Amazonas” Division of the Ecuadorean Army (IV-DIV), explained that the Ecuadorean Armed Forces reestablished their focus from the eastern and southern borders with Peru to the northern border with Colombia in 2005. “Our border is definitely porous. Colombian citizens living in the border areas [and linked to the FARC] cross the boundaries to set up support networks for the FARC’s logistics systems,” he said. With the added support to the area, they work closely with their Colombian counterparts to control the effects that sharing a permeable boundary can cause. In addition, an inset of support in the form of $100 million from the United States in the last twelve years has also helped the country’s Armed Forces reinforce and expand control of their sovereignty and national security along the northern border, as well as fight drug trafficking with a tougher hand. Specifically, the United States has backed the Ecuadorean Armed Forces Riverine Program, through a total package approach destined to the purchase of individual equipment, tactical vehicles, riverine tactical boats, infrastructure projects, logistics, operations, maintenance, and riverine and tactical training. The Counter Narcotics Riverine Program is run by the Ecuadorean Armed Forces Counter Narcotics Program and executed by the U.S. Military Group in Ecuador through support of the U.S. Southern Command in Miami, Florida. As part of the program, there are 52 boats (as well as all their related maintenance, upgrades, supplies services and training courses) stationed along different locations of the northern border – including the “Amazonas” IV-DIV in El Coca, the 55th Jungle Detachment in Putumayo, the 53rd Special Forces Group in Lago Agrio, the 56th Jungle Battalion in Santa Cecilia and the Marines Battalion in San Lorenzo – to navigate and patrol the waters along the Napo, Coca, Putumayo and San Miguel Rivers in support of counternarcotics operations against illegal armed groups, such as the FARC, and specifically their 48th Front. The patrol boatsare all designed to carry a crew of between eight and 12 Soldiers specialized to execute operations to protect the safety of the populace and sovereignty of their country over Ecuadorean waterways. Captain Oscar Abad, of the Ecuadorean Army’s Jungle and Counterinsurgency School, told Diálogo that seven fully armed and equipped crewmembers ride on each boat for a given patrol mission: three per side ready to shoot, and one machinist who handles the .50 caliber machine gun strategically positioned at the helm of each boat. “Each member is trained in the same skills, to be readily available to replace a fellow member that may be disabled in case of an emergency or attack,” he explained. In addition, he added, each mission requires the deployment of four boats at a time in order to execute thorough searches and actions. All four models have been specially designed or upgraded to have low-drive technologies with jet drive engines positioned underneath to facilitate better access through shallow, winding waterways that commonly carry debris like garbage, logs, roots, foliage, etc. Ecuador is only one of the countries to establish a stronger military presence along their waterways in recent years, and subsequently to be confronted with countering drug-trafficking. Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Panama are undergoing the same efforts. It is for that reason that representatives of the military and public defense forces of these countries visited El Coca to witness a demonstration of the Ecuadorean Armed Forces’ achievements in this regard in August, 2012. During the event, Ecuadorean Army Colonel E. Acosta, commander of the 19th “Napo” Jungle Brigade, told Diálogo, “It is very important to be the regional pioneers in this respect. It’s significant to have our neighbors and partner nations visit our facilities and see what we do because it allows us to exchange information and become better professionals in this common fight.” Commander Efrain Mann of the Honduran Navy, explained that Honduras has an established riverine program of their own. “We employ boats with external turbo propulsion engines [that work better in deeper waters], so we are interested in assessing the possibility of incorporating the same type of boats in our rivers”. For his part, Belize Defense Force Major Charlton Roches told Diálogo that Belize is soon to receive two “Pantano” model boats for use in their riverine program. “We need to have a clear understanding of the employment of these vessels … their weaknesses and strengths,” he explained. More than countering transnational organized crime, like other countries, the focus of Belize’s river operations lies with the local transit of marijuana, said Maj. Roches. According to data presented by the Ecuadorean Armed Forces, as a result of Ecuador’s successful program, the northern border area has been essentially cleared of permanent armed FARC camps in the country because they are no longer able to operate with impunity. Their previously safe refuges have been reduced to simple crossings in small unarmed groups. Additionally, the camps that the Colombian rebel group formerly set up for rest and relaxation of their troops have been greatly reduced, coca plantations are largely non-existent in the northern border area and –as a cherry on top, according to Brig. Gen. Andrade, “the Ecuadorean and Colombian militaries have established a positive and cooperative relationship that allows us to exchange information, intelligence and support for each other through regular coordination meetings to counter drug trafficking jointly.”last_img read more

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Safe Boating Week Debuts Saturday in Suffolk

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Safe Boating Week debuts this weekend in Suffolk County, shoving off a public awareness campaign aimed at preventing tragedies such as several recent fatalities off Long Island’s coast.The Suffolk County Legislature unanimously approved a resolution last week declaring May 18-24 Safe Boating Week as a part of a national program to promote boating safety, encourage boaters to take boating safety courses and raise awareness of the dangers of boating while intoxicated.“Boating is one of the best parts of our centuries old tradition and culture in Suffolk County,” said Legis. Steve Stern (D-Huntington), who proposed the law.  “A day out on the water should be a pleasure, not one that ends in tragedy.”The legislature also passed a law last year requiring that skippers in Suffolk take boater safety courses, but that doesn’t go into effect until November.Both bills were proposed after three children drowned when their boat capsized in Cold Spring Harbor on July 4 and a fisherman was killed by a drunken boater in the Great South Bay days prior.The Greater Huntington Council of Yacht and Boating Clubs, the Town of Huntington, U.S. Coast Guard Auxiliary and the Neptune Sail and Power Squadron will be offering free New York State Boating Courses for the week.  For more information about these classes, call 631-351-3256 or 631-824-7128A Nautical Flea Market is also scheduled for 11 a.m.-4 p.m. at Mill Dam Park in Huntington on Sunday.last_img read more

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Long Island Summer Camps Guide

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Russo MillienJust like backyard BBQs and trips to the beach, it wouldn’t be summer on Long Island without children’s summer camp adventures. From traditional day camps and sleepaway camps to genre-specific camps for kids interested in sports, science or the arts, there is no shortage of fun to choose from. What follows is a guide to summer camps on Long Island!TRADITIONAL DAY CAMPSBenner’s Farm Give your child an unforgettable experience as the life of a farmer at this week-long camp on a real-working farm, with weeks to choose from between June and August. Kids ages 5 to 14 may register for half-day or full-day sessions, or regular summer camp learning about animals, plants, history and science while enjoying all the fun and games. The farm also offers Kinder Camp, a hands-on program for kids ages 3 to 6. That’s in addition to the Explorers and Senior Campers programs for children ages 7 to 11 and 12 to 14. Fun, fun, fun! Benner’s Farm, 56 Gnarled Hollow Rd., East Setauket. bennersfarm.com 631-689-8172.Beth Sholom Day Camp From athletics and swimming to creative and performing arts, children get a well-rounded experience at this camp, which offers full-day and half-day sessions. The camp has four age divisions. The youngest is Junior Camp, for 3- and 4-year-olds, which is based in the Early Childhood Center. Next is Lower Camp, for elementary school students in grades 1 through 4. Then comes Upper Camp for kids in grades 5 through 8. The oldest group, the Counselors in Training, or CIT for short, for students in grades 9 and 10, assist counselors and undergo training to lead a camp group. Beth Sholom Day Camp, 401 Roslyn Rd., Roslyn Heights. bethsholomdaycamp.com 516-621-9257.Buckley Day CampThe American Camp Association-certified folks at Buckley Day Camp can’t wait for summer, and they are just counting down the days! The camp, which offers half and full days, accepts five age groups of campers with a wide range of activities such as swimming, go-carting, gymnastics, painting and yoga. Junior Camp is geared toward nursery school and Kindergarten-aged children. Intermediate Camp is for elementary school students in grades 1 through 4. Teen Camp is for students in grades 3 through 9. Senior Camp is a customized camp, with combined group experiences, and the CIT program is for the teens who are counselors-in-training. Parents can also join their kids at camp with Buckley’s Parent & Child program, which runs twice a week for six weeks. Buckley Day Camp, 2 IU Willets Rd., Roslyn. buckleycamp.com 516-365-7760.Camp HarborThis camp has it all, including swimming, music, sports, arts and crafts, group challenges, plus juggling, archery, nature and more! Full and half days are offered for all age groups. The groups are separated into Preschool and Kindergarten, 1st through 3rd Grade, 4th and 5th Grade, and 6th through 8th grade. 17 Three Sisters Rd., Saint James. hcdsny.org 631-584-5555.Camp JacobsonA program of the Sid Jacobson JCC, this camp offers a wide range of activities, such as swimming, go karts, arts, dance, drama, music, cooking and more. Parents can select a schedule that works best for them, including full-day and half-day sessions that run between two and eight months. The camp offers an Early Childhood program for toddlers ages 3 and 4, Lower Camp for Kindergartners and first graders, Upper Camp for elementary school students in grades 2 through 4, Travel Camp for students in grades 5 through 9, as well as a Teen Leadership counselor-in-training program for those entering the 10th grade. Camp Jacobson, 340 Wheatley Rd., Old Westbury. campjacobson.com 516-626-1094.Camps ‘R’ UsThis camp has locations in Baldwin, Bellmore, Farmingdale, Hicksville, Syosset, Valley Stream and West Islip. It offers sessions up to eight weeks. Programs include Tiny Tots for kids ages 3 and 4, KinderKamp for children ages 5 and 6, as well as groups for grades 1 and 2, grades 3 and 4, grades 5 and 6, and grades 7 and 8. The C2 program transitions participants from camper to counselor. The Voyager Program is a teen travel group. Camps ‘R’ Us, multiple locations. campsrus.org 516-935-2267.Camp WThis day camp’s motto is “Where Friendships Are Made.” It offers a range of activities, including athletics, swimming, creative arts, computers, rocketry, game room and more for four-week, six-week or eight-week enrollment. Children in the youngest group (4-years-old to 1st grade), Kiddie Camp, are called Wallabies. Middle Camp is for elementary school students in grades 2 and 3; Upper Camp is for those in grades 4 through 8, and the Apprentice Program is for those in grade 9. Camp W, 121 Wolf Hill Rd., Huntington Station. campwdaycamp.com 631-692-6222.Carousel Day SchoolAmong the many activities offered at this summer camp are arts and crafts, sports, dance, Zumba, games, zip lines and much more. Four-, six- or eight-week sessions are offered for kids who can attend from three to five days per week. The Puddles program is a half-day session for 2-year-olds. The Tiny Tots program is for toddlers ages 3 and 4. There’s another program for Kindergartners and 1st graders. Traditional Day Camp is for elementary school students in grades 2 through 5; the Tween Travel program is for campers going into grades 6 and 7; and the Super Seniors is for those in grades 8 through 10. Carousel Day School, 9 West Ave., Hicksville. carouseldayschool.com 516-938-1137.Catalina Beach ClubThis seven-week camp is all about the swimming, but camp goers also have an opportunity to get involved in arts and crafts, music and drama, plus cooking and science for children ages 3 to 7. Catalina Beach Club, 2045 Ocean Blvd., Atlantic Beach. catalinabeachclub.com 516-239-2150.Crestwood Country Day SchoolCrestwood campers know how to have fun. There’s water tag, a carousel, robotics, a Ferris wheel, game shows, mini golf, train rides and yoga in addition to swimming, sports, arts and adventure. They offer four-, six- and eight-week sessions, as well as half and full days. Their programs are broken up for children ages 2 to 4, 5-year-olds, 6- and 7-year-olds, 8- and 9-year-olds, and 10- to 12-year-olds. They also offer the Endeavor Program for campers with unique needs, a five-day sleep-away week for campers in grades 3 to 6, a Teen Travel program for kids in grades 6 to 11, a Leadership training program for those in grades 8 to 10, and a once-a-week Parent and Child program, which runs six weeks. Crestwood Country Day School, 313 Round Swamp Rd., Melville. crestwoodcountryday.com 631-692-6361.Driftwood Day CampBoasting 11 acres of campground replete with state-of-the-art recreation equipment and one-of-a-kind programs, Driftwood Day Camp is a truly special place to be! Campers can enroll in a variety of weekly sessions depending on grade level. Their groups include Pre-K and Kindergarten, grades 1 through 5, the Pre-Teen Travel group in grades 6 and 7, the Teen Travel group in grades 8 and 9, and Junior Counselors aged 15. Driftwood Day Camp, 331 Mt. Misery Rd., Melville. driftwooddaycamp.calls.net 631‑317‑116.Friends Academy Summer Camp This camp, located on a 65-acre private school campus, has more than 30 programs. Options include General Camp for kids aged 3 to 5, Intermediate Camp for ages 6 and 7, The Academy for children ages 8 through 13, and the LIT/CIT (leaders and counselors in training) is for teens aged 14 and 15. Session length options vary depending upon the camper’s age. Friends Academy, 270 Duck Pond Rd., Locust Valley. fa.org 516-676-0393.Future Stars Summer CampsThis camp offers a wide array of educational and recreational opportunities at four Long Island locations, including SUNY Old Westbury, Farmingdale State College, St. Joseph’s College and the Southampton Town Recreation Center. Campers can enroll in programs focused on sports, including horseback riding, dance and cheer leading, plus magic, multimedia, circus arts, drama and science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics (STEAM). Sessions range from one to eight weeks. fscamps.com 914-273-8500.Greentrees Country Day CampThis camp, which offers sessions of up to eight weeks, is broken into two groups: one for 2-year-olds and the other for children 3- to 6-years-old. Activities include water play, music and dance, arts and crafts, science and nature, field trips and special events. Greentrees Country Day Camp, 247 Jackson Ave., Syosset greentreesli.com 516-921-4949.Hofstra Summer CampsHofstra University offers a wide variety for perspective campers. Parents can enroll their children in a number of programs, including the Learning Institute, Specialty Camp, Sports Academy, BOCES and more. Rates vary depending on the length of the session, which typically runs from two to six weeks. Hofstra’s summer camp programs are extensive, with the Specialty Program including athletics, arts and overnight camp. Taken together, there’s 70 camps available in STEM/STEAM, arts, sports, aviation, engineering, graphic design, and more! Hofstra Summer Camps, 1000 Fulton Ave., Hempstead. www.hofstra.edu/academics/ce/summer-camp 516-463-CAMP.Kenwal Day CampLocated on a 20-acre plot, this camp has an inflatable water park, mini golf, arts and crafts, sports, theater, dance, swimming, zip lines, go karts, rope rappelling, karate and more. The youngest campers can enroll in half- or full-day sessions for three to five days per week. Campers can also sign up for as little as three and as many as eight weeks. Groups are divided into the Pre-School/Kindergarten Program, grades 1-4, the Super Seniors Program for those in grades 5 and 6, the Teen Program for kids in grades 7 and 8, and the counselor-in-training program. Kenwal Day Camp, 100 Drexel Ave., Melville. kenwaldaycamp.com 631-694-3399.Kids Country Day CampThis lively 10-acre camp has programs dedicated to sports, adventure, water fun, arts and special events. Kids Country Day Camp, 37B Crystal Brook Hollow Rd., Mt. Sinai. kidscountrydaycamp.com 631-331-5351.Knox Summer AdventuresKids at this camp enjoy swimming, sports, arts and other activities. Groups include the Tadpoles for those entering Kindergarten, Minnows for elementary school students in grades 1and 2, Sailfish for those in grades 3 and 4, and Dolphins for grades 5 and 6. Knox Summer Adventures, 541 Long Beach Rd., Saint James. knoxschool.org 631-686-1640.The Laurel Hill School Summer CampFrom aquatics, athletics and adventure to arts and special events, The Laurel Hill School Summer Camp has something for everyone. Programs include groups for infants from six weeks to 24 months, toddlers from 2- to 3-years-old, preschool for kids 3- to 5-year-olds and Discovery Camp for kindergartners through fifth grade. Laurel Hill also offer sports camp for those in grades 2 to 6, theater camp for grades 2 to 9, coding camp for grades 2 to 8, invention camp for grades 1 to 6, robotics camp for grades 2 to 6, and teen camp for grades 6 to 8. The Laurel Hill School Summer Camp, 201 Old Town Rd., East Setauket. laurelhillschool.org 631-751-1154.Long Island Voyagers Day CampAmong the many activities kids can enjoy at this camp are paddle boating, bowling, swimming, sports games, chocolate factories, zoos, museums and beaches. Campers can pick from two- to eight-week sessions. Children from 4-years-old through 14 are welcome. They are divided by age and/or gender. Long Island Voyagers Day Camp, Wantagh Park, Cantiague Park. livoyagersdaycamp.com 516-238-4586.LuHi Summer Camp This camp offers three two-week sessions for school-aged kids from grades 4 to 9. They provide a wide range of programs, including sports, computers, dance, digital arts, equestrian training, fencing, fishing, nature exploration, robotics, sailing, theater, visual arts, video game design and more. LuHi Summer Camp, 131 Brookville Rd., Brookville. luhisummercamps.org 516-626-1100.North Shore Day CampLocated on a 14-acre property, this traditional summer camp provides a blend of activities, from aquatics and athletics to adventure and arts, offered in increments of three and eight weeks. The Stepping Stone program is for nursery school and kindergartners, Upper Camp is for elementary school students in grades 1 to 6, and the Voyager Travel Program is for those in grades 7 to 9. North Shore Day Camp, 85 Crescent Beach Rd., Glen Cove. northshoredaycamp.com 516-676-0904.Oasis Day CampChildren as young as 3 and as old as 15 can participate in sports, swimming, creative and performing arts, outdoor adventures, field trips and more. Early Start Imagination Camp is for children between 3- and 5-years-old, Day Camp is for elementary school students in grades 1 to 6, and the Teen Travel program is for those in grades 7 through 9. LIU Post, 720 Northern Blvd., Brookville. oasischildren.com 516-299-4004/ 516-299-2000.Park Shore Day CampBesides the usual activities, this summer camp has special events, such as a carnival, pool disco, cake-decorating contests, talent shows, scavenger hunts, character lunches, theme weeks and more. The camp is for a full day, but half-day sessions are offered for the youngest groups. Toddler Day Camp is for ages 2 and 3, the Preschool Division is for ages 3 to 5, Junior Division is for ages 6 and 7, and the Senior Division is for ages 8 through 10. Park Shore Day Camp 450 Deer Park Road, Dix Hills. parkshoredaycamp.com 631-449-8580.Rolling River Day CampThis nautical-themed full- or half-day camp separates campers into four age groups and gives parents a choice of enrolling kids from four to eight weeks. Activities include swimming, arts, sports, field trips to theme parks, and boating. The Skippers program is for kids aged 2 to 5, the Mariners program is for elementary school students in grades 1 to 4, the Navigators program is for students in grades 5 to 8, and the counselors-in-training program is for those in grades 9 and 10. Rolling River Day Camp, 477 Ocean Ave., East Rockaway. rollingriver.com 516-593-CAMP.The Waldorf School of Garden City This private school offers a summer camp with full- and half-day programs, with enrollment ranging from 23 days to six weeks for children aged 3 to 13, and a counselor-in-training program for teens aged 14 to 16. The Waldorf School of Garden City, 225 Cambridge Ave., Garden City. waldorfgarden.org 516-742-3434.YMCA Summer Day CampThis camp offers four three-week sessions at six locations, including Bay Shore, East Hampton, Glen Cove, Holtsville, Huntington and Patchogue. YMCA of Long Island, Multiple locations. ymcali.org 855-296-2254.Young People’s Day CampsWith nine locations across the New York Metro area, this camp has facilities in Nassau and Suffolk that offer sessions ranging from two to eight weeks for kids aged 4 to 14. Activities include swimming, sports, arts, talent shows and field trips. Young People’s Day Camps, multiple locations. ypdc.com 1-800-DAY-CAMP/ 631-476-3330.SPORTS CAMPSThomas School Summer Day Camp & Riding Academy250 Round Swamp Rd., Melville. tshcamp.com 631-692-6840.Shark & Fishing CampStar Island Road, Montauk. oseasfdn.org 914-226-8149.Gymnastics & Bounce Adventure Summer Camp1074 Pulaski St., Riverhead. thesafariadventure.com 631-727-4386.SportsPro Camps1001 Crooked Hill Rd., Suffolk Community College: Michael J. Grant Campus, Brentwood. sportsprocamps.com 631-223-8030.NorthSport Athletic Facility469 Fort Salonga Rd., Northport northsportny.com 631-757-BALL/ 631-757-2255.LI Junior Ducks Baseball Camp41 Saxon Ave., Bay Shore. ducksbaseball.org 631-665-CAMP.STEM CAMPSCulturePlayChoose from game design, coding, robotics and Minecraft. CulturePlay, 220 East Meadow Ave., East Meadow. cultureplay.org 516-222-0031.STEM & Space Summer CampCradle of Innovation STEM & Space Summer Camp, Charles Lindbergh Blvd., Garden City. cradleofaviation.org 516-572-4111.Mad Science More than a dozen locations across Long Island. longisland.madscience.org 516-620-6768.Extreme STEM Science Kids 450 Deer Park Rd., Dix Hills. extremesteamcamp.com 631-499-8580.iD Tech Adelphi University, 1 South Ave., Garden City. liu.edu 888-709-8324.Lavner CampNYIT, Northern Blvd., Old Westbury. lavnercampsandprograms.com 646-308-1555.Center for Science Teaching & Learning1 Tanglewood Rd., Rockville Centre. cstl.org 516-764-0045.ART SUMMER CAMPSAbrakadoodleWith creative art themes like The Big Abrakadoodle Circus, Art Rocks and Pirate Island, your kid won’t want to come back home after each day of excitement! Abrakadoodle, multiple locations. abrakadoodle.com 516-686-6900.Art League of Long Island600 South Service Rd., Chestnut Hill Elementary School, Dix Hills. artleagueli.net 631-462-5400.IncrediFlixVarious locations. incrediflix.com 201-331-3306.Long Island Academy of Fine Art Traditional painting will be studied as well as paper arts and other fine arts mediums. Long Island Academy of Fine Art, 14A Glen St., Glen Cove. liafa.com 516-590-4324.Picasso KidzChildren will learn art history and draw portrait art during their time here. Picasso Kidz, 72 Broadway, Greenlawn. picassokidz.com 631-261-5500.Summer Art AdventureChildren will engage creatively with many mediums like oil paint, watercolors and sculpting. Art League of Long Island Summer Art Adventure, 107 East Deer Park Rd., Dix Hills. artleagueliregistration.org 631-462-5400.USDAN Summer Camp for the ArtsChildren can major in animation, art adventure, gaming design and minor in comic drawing and so much more. USDAN Summer Camp for the Arts, 185 Colonial Springs Rd., Wheatley Heights. usdan.org 631-643-7900.MUSIC AND THEATER CAMPSBack to Rock, 1015 Port Washington Blvd., Port Washington. portwashington.b2rmusic.com 877-227-8558.BroadHollow Theatre Company Children will engage in improv and other awesome activities like stage fighting and vocal class. BroadHollow Theatre Company, 265 East Main St., East Islip. dreammakersli.com 631-581-2700.From Stage to ScreenHalf of the day will be spent rehearsing for the big musical! From Stage to Screen, 589 West Jericho Tpke., Huntington. fromstage2screen.com 631-423-4440.Madison Theatre Day Camp 1000 Hempstead Ave, Rockville Centre. madisontheatreny.org 516-323-4448.Professional Youth Theatre160 W. Park Ave., Long Beach. professionalyouththeatre.com 516-808-5770.USDAN Summer Camp for the ArtsUSDAN also offers two outdoor theaters, rehearsal studios and costume and prop shops. USDAN Summer Camp for the Arts, 185 Colonial Springs Rd., Wheatley Heights. usdan.org 631-643-7900.SLEEPAWAY CAMPS4-H CampChildren aged 8 to 16 can get the classic sleep-away-from-home experience at Dorothy P. Flint’s 4-H Camp, which is ACA-accredited. Campers will cook, ride horseback, and have fun as they get to know their fellow campers. Dorothy P. Flint Nassau County 4-H Camp, 3186 Sound Ave., Riverhead. ccenassau.org 516-433-7970.Peconic Dunes 4-H CampDuring eight one-week-long sleep-away sessions, campers can enjoy the Long Island Sound waterfront while they do sports, arts and outdoor activities. Peconic Dunes 4-H Camp, 6375 Sound View Ave., Southold. ccesuffolk.org 631-727-7850.Blue Bay Girl Scouts Sleepaway CampCampers need not be Girl Scouts to sign up for one- or two-week sessions to sleep in a cabin or a tent overlooking Gardiners Bay after a day of fun. Camp Blue Bay, 103 Flaggy Hole Rd., East Hampton. gsnc.org 516-741-2550.Camp DeWolfe Sleepaway CampThis Christian sleep-away camp offers sessions ranging from one to six weeks for children ages 7 to 17. Camp DeWolfe Sleepaway Camp, 408 North Side Rd., Wading River. campdewolfe.org 631- 929-4325.Camp QuinipetThis beachfront Christian sleep-away camp allows campers to request up to two of their own bunkmates. Campers aged 7 to 17 stay in a cabin as they experience the classic pleasures of summer camp near a beautiful dock. Camp Quinipet, 99 Shore Rd., Shelter Island. quinipet.org 631-749-0430.North Shore Holiday HouseEstablished in 1914 by a local group of women to serve and empower girls coming from low-income families, this all-girls sleep-away camp strives to expose children to diversity. North Shore Holiday House, 74 Huntington Rd., Huntington. nshh.org 631-427-7630.On The Go Teen Travel CampCampers aged 11 to 15 can broaden their experience as they see new sights over the summer with day trips and overnight stays. Action Park and Brownstone Adventure Park are two known destinations, and more are coming. On The Go Teen Travel Camp, 445 Broadhollow Rd. #25, Melville. onthego.camp 551-800-2267.Mid-Island Y JCCCampers are encouraged to speak Hebrew as much as possible at this camp, which offers day camp, sports camp, theater camp, travel camp and special needs camp in addition to sleep-away camp. Mid-Island Y JCC, 45 Manetto Hill Rd., Plainview. miyjccsummercamp.org 516-822-3535.last_img read more

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Sexual Assault Awareness Month, 2017

first_img It’s On Us PA,  Proclamations WHEREAS, Sexual Assault Awareness Month draws attention to the fact that sexual violence is widespread and is a violation of human rights and dignity; andWHEREAS, there is a high prevalence of these crimes going unreported, oftentimes because the victims are afraid or fear they will not be believed; andWHEREAS, in addition to the immediate physical and emotional effects, sexual assault can lead to short and long-term physical and mental health problems including anxiety, chronic pain, eating disorders, depression, and sexually transmitted diseases or infections; andWHEREAS, it is imperative that Pennsylvanians are aware of safety measures that can prevent sexual assaults and that victims are able to attain the support needed to overcome such a traumatic event; andWHEREAS, with leadership, dedication, and community involvement, there is compelling evidence that we can be successful in reducing instances of sexual assault in Pennsylvania through prevention education, increased awareness, and holding perpetrators who commit acts of violence responsible for their actions; andWHEREAS, Pennsylvania has initiatives such as the It’s On Us campaign to make a substantial difference in the awareness, reporting, and prevention of sexual assault within the commonwealth.THEREFORE, I, Tom Wolf, Governor of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, do hereby proclaim April 2017, as SEXUAL ASSAULT AWARENESS MONTH. I encourage all of our citizens to join with victim and prevention advocates in supporting service programs to help victims overcome the harm caused by sexual assault.GIVEN under my hand and the Seal of the Governor, at the City of Harrisburg, this third day of April two thousand seventeen, the year of the commonwealth the two hundred forty-first.TOM WOLFGovernorRead full text of the letter below. You can also view the letter on Scribd and as a PDF.Governor Wolf Proclamation — Sexual Assault Awareness Month, 2017 by Governor Tom Wolf on Scribd SHARE Email Facebook Twitter April 04, 2017 Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Sexual Assault Awareness Month, 2017last_img read more

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Fisheries officer and local fisherman take part in FAD’s workshop in St. Kitts

first_img Share LocalNews Fisheries officer and local fisherman take part in FAD’s workshop in St. Kitts by: – October 7, 2011 Fish agrregating device. Image via: dpi.nsw.gov.auFisheries Officer Julian Defoe and Layou Fisherman Bertley Carrette has left the island for St. Kitts and Nevis, to conduct a one week training workshop in Fish Aggregating Devices (FADs) for fishermen in this twin island state.The workshop is part of the technical cooperation assistance programme sponsored by the Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA) in collaboration with the Dominica Fisheries Division (DFD) and the National Association of Fisherfolk Cooperative (NAFCOOP) to the St. Kitts and Nevis Fisheries Departments.The Dominican fisheries officials will teach among other things, FAD construction, deployment, maintenance and management.They will also share knowledge on how to fish around FADs and targeted species associated with FADs.The one week training course will also involve going out to sea for practical know-how on best practices of FAD’s for best results from FADs’.Fish Aggregating (or aggregation) Device (FAD) is a man-made object used to attract ocean going pelagic fish species such as marlin, tuna and dolphin fish. FADs usually consist of buoys or floats attached to the ocean floor with concrete blocks or sand bags. Over 300 species of fish gather around and are attracted to FADs for numerous reasons that vary by species, thermocline and water column.This is not the first time that the DFD has provided technical training in fisheries to St. Kitts and Nevis. Earlier this year, the DFD / NAFCOOP and JICA dispatched two fishers to conduct training in Vertical Long Line fishing.In January of this year, four persons from Grenada spent one week in Dominica receiving training in FADs conducted by the DFD and NAFCOOP. Dominica Vibes News Sharing is caring! Sharecenter_img 108 Views   one comment Tweet Sharelast_img read more

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Capitol to set up 24/7 helpdesk for OFWs in MidEast

first_imgQueries would be channeled toconcerned government agencies dealing with the situation of Filipinos in thetwo tension-filled Arab states. Filipinos maysecure their exit visas and plane tickets needed for their repatriation fromtheir employers, he noted. In a FacebookLive yesterday, Chargé d’Affaires Jomar Sadie said Iraq has been placed underAlert Level 4, or mandatory repatriation. ILOILO – Beginning Friday, Jan. 10,the provincial government would be operating a 24/7 helpdesk for Ilonggos withrelatives in the Middle East, especially in Iran and Iraq. Theprovincial government will create Task Force Bulig Ilonggo to coordinate theassistance of the provincial government and partner agencies. TheDepartment of Foreign Affairs (DFA) said the raising of Alert Level 4 in Iraqwas “a result of the government’s coordination meetings on the situation in theMiddle East in the past few days.” “The AlertLevel in the entire Iraq has been raised to Alert Level 4 calling for mandatoryevacuation,” DFA Assistance Secretary Eduardo Meñez told reporters in amessage. “Consideringthe time zone difference between the Philippines and the Middle East, we adviserelatives to visit the helpdesk in the evening,” said Provincial AdministratorSuzette Mamon. The helpdeskwould be positioned at the capitol lobby and equipped with telephone and Wi-Ficonnections for efficient communication. Accordingto OWWA case welfare officer Jack Arroyo, threefamilies sought his agency’s help on Jan. 7 to repatriate relatives working astruck drivers in Iraq. Thereare 30 Western Visayans currently working and residing in Iran and Iraq, datafrom the Overseas Workers Welfare Administration (OWWA) Region 6 showed. Therecould be undocumented Ilonggo workers there, too. It willlikewise activate the Migration and Development Council to be spearheaded bythe Public Employment Service Office. The council is tasked to reintegrate thedisplaced OFWs to local employment. Those inattendance at the emergency meeting were Sangguniang Panlalawigan memberRolando Distura, chairperson of the Committee on Labor and Employment; andrepresentatives of the Department of Labor and Employment (Regional Director Cyril Ticao), Overseas Workers Welfare Association (casewelfare officer Jack Arroyo), PhilippineOverseas Employment Administration (officer-in-charge Rhea GlendaCalantas), andDepartment of Foreign Affairs. Filipinos inneed of assistance can contact the embassy at 07816066822; 07516167838;07518764665; 07508105240 or through the email baghdad.pe@dfa.gov.ph orembaphilbaghdad.secretary1@gmail.com./PN Earlyyesterday Iran struck back at the United States by firing a series ofballistic missiles at two military bases in Iraq housing American troops. Upon theorder of Gov. Arthur Defensor Jr., Vice Gov. Christine Garin, the actinggovernor, called for an emergency meeting yesterday with concerned governmentagencies to discuss possible assistance for distressed Ilonggo overseasFilipino workers (OFWs) in the Middle East. For Filipinoswhose employers would not allow them to return to the Philippines, Sadie alsoadvised them to coordinate with the Philippine embassy. Tensionis escalating in the volatile region following the United States’ assassinationof Iran’s top military general who was visiting Iraq’s capital, Baghdad on Jan.3. “If you donot have an employer or if you’re a victim of human trafficking, you can callus so that we can extend help or you can directly go to the embassy if you arestaying in Baghdad,” Sadie added. Yesterday, the national governmentordered the mandatory repatriation of Filipinos in Iraq. Sadie advisedFilipinos in Iraq to coordinate with the embassy as well as their respectiveemployers.last_img read more

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