City of Jamestown Man Charged In Last Week’s Hit-And-Run Of Toddler

first_imgJAMESTOWN – A City of Jamestown man is facing charges in connection with a hit-and-run of a toddler last week in the area of 336 E. 5th St. Jamestown Police say Nicholas S. Evans, 27, allegedly struck a two-year-old male with his vehicle before leaving the scene last Thursday.Evans is charged with leaving the scene of a personal injury accident and multiple vehicle and traffic charges.Police say they responded to a report of a small child being struck as they were walking along the side of the road with its family. Evans allegedly didn’t stop and continued without stopping. Evans reportedly continued and drove into a parking lot at East Fourth Street at East Second Street where a group of individuals who had witnessed the accident approached the vehicle and did break out the driver’s side window to the vehicle.Evans, who was now in fear of harm to himself, did drive away again and stopped in a lot on Franklin Street where officers from the JPD located him.Police say the man will appear in Jamestown City Court a later date to answer the charges. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window),Why where the parents not charged with endangering the welfare of a child? There is a said walk there why would they be walking on side of the road unless they where trying to get hit. That type of accident is foreseeable to any reasonable person there for the parents should be held accountable for their neglect and recklessness for walking in the road with a 2 year old when there is a sidewalk 3 feet to the side of them.last_img read more

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State of Vermont: 50,000 without power

first_imgMap as of 10 am Monday.Vermont officials were preparing to assess the damage from Sunday’s flooding as clean-up and recovery efforts begin Monday. The extent of damage to roads, bridges, homes and businesses caused by the remnants of Hurricane Irene was unknown but was expected to stretch from one end of Vermont to the other. As of Monday morning roughly 50,000 Vermont power customers were without service,and officials warned that impassable roads could make restoring electricity to all areas a lengthy process. Transportation officials reported that some 263 roads had been impacted to varying degrees and several bridges destroyed by the floodwaters; a map of affected roads can be viewed at: http://www.511vt.com/default.asp?area=VT_statewide(link is external) Nine Red Cross shelters had been set up around the state and more than two dozen towns had opened their own shelters, but the number of people displaced by the heavy rains and flooding was not immediately available. In Rutland, some 80 residents of two residential care facilities, the St. Joseph Kervick Residence and the Loretto Home, were temporarily being housed at the Rutland Regional Medical Center. Patients in some areas of the Vermont State Hospital in Waterbury were relocated within the grounds after flood waters rose into the Vermont State Office Complex next to the Winooski River. That flooding in Waterbury Village also forced Vermont Emergency Management to relocate the state’s Emergency Operations Center to the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s temporary offices in Burlington. ‘We were fortunate to have a place that met our technological and logistical needs so close,’ Vermont Emergency Operations Center Manager Chris Reinfurt said. ‘We were able to restore the EOC to operation in a couple of hours.’ FEMA officials, who have been in the state since June helping Vermont recover from heavy rains and flooding earlier this spring, had been working with their state counterparts in the days leading up to Sunday’s heavy rains and were slated to take part in damage assessments. One fatality in Vermont has been attributed to the storm; police confirmed they had recovered a body from the Deerfield River in Wilmington Sunday evening, where a woman had been washed away by floodwaters earlier and feared drowned. Officials warned Vermonters to be careful of downed power lines and always assume they are live and report them to authorities. They also cautioned against driving through standing water.VTrans Areas of Vermont are still under water but rivers are now receding. Much of the state is starting to dry out but there are still many hazards and the public is encouraged to exercise caution.  Everyone is asked to stay off roads unless absolutely necessary.  Many roads are still damaged, and many may be washed out under the road surface and could give away at any time. A number of towns are asking that all traffic stay away, please respect detours and all road closures. See map and list below. Local road closures are too many to list.  It is estimated more than 250 roads around the state are damaged, many of them are impassable.  Every state road with the exception of Interstates 89 and 91 were closed at least for a time and many are still closed. Transportation and emergency officials are out today ensuring citizens are accounted for, assessing damage, and determining what areas are safe. All state offices are closed on Monday due to hazardous travel conditions. Homeowners should not return to a flooded home or turn on their circuit breaker until the electrical system has been inspected by a licensed electrician.  Wires could be wet and could lead to electrocution if not inspected. Around 50,000 power customers are without service.  Restoring power may be slowed for some utilities because of road conditions.  That is another reason to stay off the roads.  Power restoration will take some time, so patience will be necessary. The Vermont Fuel Dealers Association reports that ‘many service technicians are out chasing propane tanks that have been swept away in the floods. Homeowners with aboveground storage tanks should contact their propane provider immediately if their tank has moved from its foundation or if they smell gas.’ Those who need road conditions should call 511 or go to www.511vt.com(link is external) â ¦ do NOT call 211 for road conditions. There are currently six Red Cross shelters open: Brattleboro, VT ‘ Brattleboro Union High School ‘ Fairground RoadSpringfield, VT ‘ Springfield High School — 303 South StreetHartford, VT ‘ Hartford High School ‘ 37 Highland AvenueRutland, VT ‘ Rutland High School ‘ 22 Stratton RoadBarre, VT ‘ Barre AuditoriumSt. Johnsbury, VT ‘ The St. Johnsbury School ‘ 257 Western Avenue Vermont Emergency Management has moved its Emergency Operations Center to the FEMA offices in Burlington.  Contact information for the media is 802-951-2708.  The VEM e-mail server is also down, a temporary e-mail address for the press to contact the information office is vemirene@hotmail.com(link sends e-mail) .  The Vermont Agency of Transportation has been working throughout the night and continues today to assess road conditions along state infrastructure resulting from Hurricane Irene.  VTrans priority is to establish safe passage for travelers and is closing roads, when needed, and establishing safe detours.  VTrans urges members of the public to exercise extreme caution in navigating the State highway system.  If travel is not necessary, Vermonters are asked to stay home so emergency responders and road crews can conduct damage assessments to the State’s infrastructure.  There are State highway closures throughout the state, some State highway bridges are completely washed out, while others may be compromised.  It will be several days before State officials can inspect all of the State bridges impacted by the extreme flooding caused by hurricane Irene.  Roads may be undermined by the flooding and slope failures may still be occurring. State officials are assessing which communities may be cut off and what infrastructure needs to be repaired first in order that power crews may gain access to down power lines and transformers. While the Vermont Agency of Transportation knows about the closures to the State highway system, town road closures are reported to Vermont Emergency Management.  The final number and location of all town roads and bridges that are closed or impassable is still unknown at this time.  The public is urged not to cross roadways with standing water.  VTrans Operations crews have been deployed since the beginning of the weather event working through the evening and are still on the job making repairs to the state system.  VTrans is deploying bridge inspection teams including teams from out of state and FEMA to inspect Vermont’s bridges.  It will be several days before all bridges, state and town can be inspected.   To receive the latest information on State road and bridge closures, the public can access the State 511 system at http://www.511vt.com/(link is external). Following are the state highway closures in effect as of 4 am.District OneRoute 7 south of ManchesterRoute 100/9 in ReadsboroRoute 100 north of WilmingtonRoute 9 in WilmingtonRoute 30 at Route 133 in PawletDistrict TwoRoute 30 at Newfane, Jamaica ‘ bridges outRoute 9 west of Brattleboro in area of Shell Station & Cumberland Farms.I-91 SB between Exits 5 and 6Route 5 in Rockingham ‘ bridge 39 underminingRoute 103 Chester at the new bridge 1 mile south of Route 11Route 131 in Cavendish near Chub HillRoute 11 in spots ‘ Chester ‘ Andover and Windham.Route 100 Jamaica near Route 30 IntersectionRoute 100 in WestonRoute 103 in ChesterRoute 100 in WardsboroDistrict 3Route 7 north of WallingfordRoute 4 east of RutlandRoute 7 north of RutlandRoute 100 LudlowRoute 144 East WallingfordRoute 103 Mount HollyRoute 100 between Route 4 and PittsfordRoute 73 between 53 and Route 100Route 7 near Route 73 in BrandonDistrict 4Route 4 in West WoodstockRoute 100 Granville GulfRoute 107 between Bethel and Route 100Route 12 between Route 4 and 107Route 12A in West BraintreeDistrict 5Route 116 between Route 125 and 17Route 125 between Route 116 and Route 100Route 17 between Route 116 and Huntington RoadI-89 in ColchesterRoute 2 JonesvilleDistrict 6Route 100 Moretown to WaitsfieldRoute 100BRoute 12 Berlin to RivertonRoute 12 WorcesterRoute 14 in WoodburyDistrict 7Route 5 north of St. JohnsburyRoute 302 in GrotonRoute 5 in LyndonvilleRoute 122 previously closed now openRoute 5A at Route 5 in West BurkeDistrict 8Route 118 previously closed now openRoute 105 between Enosburg and BerkshireRoute 242 west of Jay PeakDistrict 9Route 242 east of Jay PeakRoute 16 between I-91 and BartonRoute 105 between 114 and Lakeshore Drive near Island Pond Vermont Emergency Management. VTrans. 8.29.2011last_img read more

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Belize Proposes New Tactics to Combat Transnational Organized Crime

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo January 06, 2017  Belize, located on the northeastern coast of Central America, wants to partner with its regional neighbors to defeat a common enemy: transnational organized crime. Just 290 km long and 110 km wide, Belize confronts some of the same security threats as Mexico and Guatemala, with whom it shares borders on the west and north.Major Jermaine Nolan Burns, the commanding officer of the Belize Defence Force Air Wing and Special Boat Unit, believes that partnering with the United States and the Central American countries is fundamental in their fight against transnational organized crime. Maj. Burns enlisted as an officer candidate of the Belize Defence Force in June 2000. Since then, he’s risen in ranks with the goal of finding new ways to counter criminals.As he told Diálogo at the Central American Air Chiefs Conference, which took place on December 12th-13th 2016, in Tucson, Arizona, sharing information and intelligence are fundamental techniques that countries can leverage to counter the threats to their security. Diálogo: What is the importance of your presence at the Central American Air Chiefs conference? Major Jermaine Nolan Burns: The importance of being here with all the other Central American air chiefs is for us to share information on how we can develop new tactics to combat transnational organized crime from an aviation perspective.It’s very important for us to share information because if we don’t collaborate, and instead try to fight this situation on an individual basis, it will definitely mean failure. The way criminal networks are working these days is that they depend on their partners from the different countries they are operating in for them to succeed; so that is the same approach that the military has to take in order for us to combat these crimes. Being with the other Central American air chiefs helps us to look at where the voids are and decide how we can go about to fill them, discussing where the problem is and how each is combating them in their individual country. We try to model our tactics from what each other does essentially through evaluating our successes.Diálogo: What is your country looking to achieve with its participation at this annual event? Major Burns: The country of Belize and more so the Belize Defence Force is looking to the hosting nation, which is the United States, for further development, cooperation, and military funding. We are also looking at the way the other air elements of the Central American countries conduct their business because we are very elementary in the aviation field.Most of those countries are much more mature than we are. Our country is so young, and our participation here helps us to look at ways of how our neighboring countries look at their issues in order for them to succeed. If it is a good model for them, maybe it can be a good model for our defense forces or aviation assets, so we can succeed as well. Diálogo: What are your country’s most important security concerns? Major Burns: In terms of security, we have some internal and external aggression. Our internal aggression, like that of El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras, is mostly the gang issues from the youth.At this conference, I have been able to engage with the Louisiana National Air Guard and the Joint Interagency Task Force-South to talk about different topics about our partnership for the reform school program. With this partnership, we take youths from the streets that are in trouble to place them into an education program.The final goal is to send them back into society hoping that they won’t go into gangs and other illicit activities. In terms of external aggression, we have the same transnational organized crime that is plaguing all Central American countries. Belize is being used as a drug transit point. Airplanes are landing in clandestine places in the country.Human trafficking is a problem, and a lot of drugs are passing through the country trying to make their way up to the corridor into the Mexican area and up to the United States.Belize, like Guatemala, which is our neighbor over to the west, is just used as a transshipment point. This is a security concern because it affects our civil population that is involved with these kinds of crimes. Diálogo: Why are the collaboration, partnerships, and exchanges among partner nations, including the United States, so important in achieving a common criterion to fight transnational organized crime? Major Burns: The level of partnership that we have with the United States is through our Joint Intelligence and Operation Center.The center is the main intelligence and operations focus for law enforcement agencies including the Belize Defence Force, the Coast Guard, the Police Department, and the Belize Customs and Immigration units. It is all the law enforcement in one building and we have a cooperating nation’s information exchange system, where our radar service is shared to track illegal aircraft flying in our region.We also have a chat system where we are able to talk and collaborate with all the Latin American countries and their signatories to this program. We are able to exchange intelligence in order for us to combat the organized crime that is passing through our countries. For example, Colombia could instantly reach us through our operations center to inform us that there is an aircraft that left the country, which they suspect is an illegal airplane, so we can coordinate further action.These partnerships are very important, and it is so fundamental we maintain these programs with information sharing. Diálogo: As an observer of the System of Cooperation among the American Air Forces (SICOFAA), what are the most important benefits for Belize? Major Burns: It ties back to the information sharing.Although we are only in the observer seat, it helps us to, first of all, see what other Latin American countries are doing. We rate their successes and see if it is applicable to a country like Belize. It is also important for looking at where Belize can capitalize on information sharing with these countries and forge the relationship between the different security agencies in the region.last_img read more

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Disciplinary Action

first_imgDisciplinary Action December 15, 2004 Disciplinary Actions Disciplinary Actioncenter_img The Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders suspended six attorneys, reprimanded eight, and accepted the resignation of four attorneys.The following lawyers are disciplined: Lori Elizabeth Ager, 402 S. Monroe St., Tallahassee, suspended from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following a Sept. 21 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1995) On July 13, Ager plead no contest to two counts of manslaughter by driving under the influence and was sentenced to five years of adjudication followed by 10 years probation. (Case no. SC04-1756) Howard I. Alabaster, 9600 W. Sample Road, Ste. 507, Coral Springs, resigned in lieu of disciplinary proceedings, with leave to seek readmission after five years, effective retroactive to June 10, 2002. ( Admitted to practice: 1979) At the time of Alabaster’s resignation, a case was pending at the Supreme Court level against him for alleged contempt, precipitated by his misrepresentation of himself as an attorney and a member in good standing after his suspension, and by his misrepresentations of fact to the referee during the course of his reinstatement proceedings. (Case no. SC04-1394) Karel Herman Baarslag, 3540 Coronado Drive, Apt. 502, Sarasota, resigned in lieu of disciplinary proceedings, with leave to seek readmission after three years, effective 30 days following a September 15 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1976) At the time of Baarslag’s resignation, he was under investigation for two cases that were pending at the grievance committee level. (Case no. SC04-1343) Ann Bitterman, 3721 S. LeJeune Road, Coconut Grove, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective immediately following a September 23 court order. Bitterman is further placed on probation for three years. ( Admitted to practice: 1986) Among several Bar violations, Bitterman violated or attempted to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct; engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation; and knowingly disobeyed an obligation under the rules of a tribunal. (Case no. SC03-1370) Suzanne Consagra, 1040 Woodcock Road, Ste. 214, Orlando, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 60 days, effective 30 days following a September 15 court order. Upon reinstatement, Consagra is further placed on probation for three years. ( Admitted to practice: 1985) Among several Bar violations, Consagra failed to maintain minimum trust accounting records; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or disciplinary agency when conducting an investigation into her conduct. (Case no. SC03-2147) David Deutsch, 16585 N.W. Second Ave., Miami, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a September 30 court order. Deutsch shall attend The Florida Bar’s Advertising Workshop prior to petitioning for reinstatement. ( Admitted to practice: 1989) Deutsch made prohibited statements and information about himself or his services; revealed the nature of a legal problem on the outside of a brochure; and failed to pay the required late filing fee for an advertisement. (Case no. SC04-384) Nadege Elliott, P.O. Box 150773, Cape Coral, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 75 days, effective September 29, following a September 15 court order. Upon reinstatement, Elliott is further placed on probation for one year. ( Admitted to practice: 1998) Among several Bar violations, Elliott violated or attempted to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct, knowingly assisted or induced another to do so, or did so through the acts of another; engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice; and knowingly disobeyed an obligation under the rules of a tribunal. (Case no. SC03-2071) Godwin James Essien, 1978 Crystal Downs Court, Oviedo, resigned in lieu of disciplinary history, with leave to seek readmission after five years, effective immediately following a September 2 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1994) At the time of Essien’s resignation, he had several cases pending at the Supreme Court and investigative level. (Case no. SC04-1032) Knovack Gramby Jones, 18590 N.W. 67th Ave., Ste. 201, Hialeah, resigned in lieu of disciplinary proceedings, without leave to seek readmission, effective 30 days following a Sept. 30 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1983) At the time of Jones’ resignation, she was under investigation for a complaint involving alleged misuse of trust funds. (Case no. SC04-1357) Mario Joseph Louis, 80 S.W. Eighth St., Ste. 3330, Miami, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a September 15 court order. Louis is further placed on probation for one year. ( Admitted to practice: 1990) On January 17, 2002, Louis pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge and was ordered to complete nine months probation and 100 hours of community service. (Case no. SC04-1692) Cecile Angela Martin, 18350 N.W. Second Ave., Floor 5, Miami, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a September 15 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1984) Among several Bar violations, Martin failed to provide competent representation to a client; neglected to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into her conduct. (Case no. SC04-533) Michael M. O’Brien, 105 E. Robinson St., Ste. 307, Orlando, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a September 23 court order. O’Brien is further placed on probation for three years. ( Admitted to practice: 1981) Among several Bar violations, O’Brien failed to comply with the Rules Regulating Trust Accounts; failed, at least annually, to prepare a detailed listing identifying the balance of the unexpended trust money held for each client or matter; and failed to perform minimum trust accounting procedures. (Case no. SC03-2154) Guillermo Enrique Pena, 444 Brickell Ave., #U51-119, Miami, suspended from practicing law in Florida for one year, effective retroactive to November 24, 2003. ( Admitted to practice: 1991) Pena failed to comply with the Rules Regulating Trust Accounts; engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation; and engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice. (Case no. SC03-1455) Scott Goodman Ryals, 512 S. Second St., Ft. Pierce, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a September 15 court order. Ryals is further placed on probation, not to exceed one year requiring restitution. ( Admitted to practice: 1997) Among several Bar violations, Ryals failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information; and entered into an agreement for, charged, or collected an illegal, prohibited, or clearly excessive fee. (Case no. SC04-1675) Jack Schrold, 6838 N.W. 117th Ave., Parkland, suspended from practicing law in Florida for two years, effectively immediately following a September 23 court order. A full restoration of Schrold’s civil rights shall be an express condition of his rehabilitation and reinstatement to practice law in the State of Florida. ( Admitted to practice: 1993) Among several Bar violations, Schrold violated or attempted to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct, knowingly assisted or induced another to do so, or did so through the acts of another; and committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on his honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer in other respects. (Case no. SC04-360) Stephanie Diane Staples, P.O. Box 2518, Palatka, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a September 30 court order. Staples is further placed on probation for three years. ( Admitted to practice: 1994) Among several Bar violations, Staples failed to provide competent representation to a client; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and entered into an agreement for, charged, or collected an illegal, prohibited, or clearly excessive fee. (Case no. SC04-421) Lee C. Summers, 4913 Sugar Pine Drive, Boca Raton, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a September 23 court order. Summers must attend and satisfactorily complete The Florida Bar’s ethics school. ( Admitted to practice: 1979) Summers failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client and violated the Rules Regulating Trust Accounts. (Case no. SC04-610) Clifford Martin Travis, P.O. Box 523, Inverness, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a September 23 court order. Travis is further placed on probation for two years. ( Admitted to practice: 1983) Travis failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and failed to promptly comply with reasonable requests for information; and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC04-863) Court orders are not final until time expires to file a rehearing motion and, if filed, determined. The filing of such a motion does not alter the effective date of the discipline.last_img read more

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A Modest Plan to Save The NFL

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Do you feel small and insignificant when Super Bowl Sunday rolls around? Well, you should.  Just take a quick look at some of the  players in Super Bowl XLVIII:FOR THE DENVER BRONCOSOrlando Franklin, 6’7”, 320 lbs.Winston Justice, 6’6”, 317 lbs.Vinston Painter, 6’6”, 309 lbs.Chris Clark, 6’5”, 305 lbs.Terrance Knighton, 6’3”, 335 lbs.Even their quarterback,Peyton Manning, is 6’5” tall and weighs 230 pounds.FOR THE SEATTLE SEAHAWKSBreno Giacomini, 6’7”, 318 lbs.Tony McDaniel , 6’7”, 305 lbs.Paul McQuistan, 6’6”, 315 lbs.Russell Okung, 6’5”, 310 lbs.Michael Bowie, 6’4”, 332 lbs.Their quarterback, littleRussell Wilson, stands 5’11” tall, and weighs in at 206 pounds.You have to admit that these are really, really large people. And any kid dreaming of playing in the NFL had better have some super-size genes in his family.I think this is grossly unfair to us ordinary-sized people—hey, we’re still the vast majority in this country—and frankly, does not bode well for the future of football.It is obviously one reason why soccer (which the rest of the world calls football) is making such enormous strides in America. Any kid, of any size, can dream of being a soccer star and playing in the World Cup.Seriously: Soccer’s super-star, Leo Messi of Barcelona, is just 5’6” and weighs 148 pounds. And the “2013 World Player of the Year” is Cristiano Ronaldo of Real Madrid, who is 6’1”, 165 pounds.No wonder that the last World Cup was watched by more than 3.2 billion people in every single country and territory on Earth, including Antarctica and the Arctic Circle. Even in the USA, more than 24 million people tuned into the final game.So here’s my idea to save the NFL:I propose that each team in the NFL should be limited to 1.25 tons of players on the field at the same time.That’s right—one-and-a-quarter tons of players on offense vs. one-and-a-quarter tons of players on defense, 2,500 pounds vs. 2,500 pounds. And not an ounce more on either team.Sure, if a coach really wanted to, he could still put an offensive line of five 310-pound players on the field. But that would leave him with only 950 pounds for both tight ends and the whole backfield—an average of only 158 pounds per player!Is this an opportunity for us ordinary-sized people or what?The bottom line is that a whole bunch of very talented, regular-sized players would have a chance to play on NFL teams and maybe even get to the Super Bowl.And I predict that TV ratings will go through the roof—because people like watching people just like themselves. (Which is probably why we watch shows like American Idol in the first place!)A great feeling of pride will sweep America: “Hey, look at that 170-pound, 5’8” guy going down the field—I can do that!Now I suppose some nitpicker will say that we shouldn’t call it the “Super” Bowl anymore—not with our 1.25 ton-per-team weight limit.But I suspect that’s just a marketing problem.We can always call it “Super Bowl Light.”Or even better, “The First Super Bowl With No Saturated Fat.”last_img read more

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Govt fails to confirm at least five minors among COVID-19 fatalities

first_imgIn the month since the first COVID-19 case was identified in Indonesia, the country has recorded at least five minors among the deaths of people infected with or suspected of being infected with COVID-19.The government’s official data, however, has so far not acknowledged that any deaths among minors have occurred. The information The Jakarta Post has obtained is either from leaked data or from regional administrations that has not been confirmed by the central government.The data is scattered and not all of it has complete information regarding whether the children were healthy prior to infection or had other underlying conditions. Director of Save the Children Indonesia Tata Sudrajat said the government must pay more attention to minors, especially minors who have a history of comorbidity.“It is commonly known that the elderly with underlying illnesses are the most vulnerable to COVID-19. Children with illnesses, however, have not been a concern,” he told the Post on Wednesday.To address the matter, Tata said, the government must first and foremost provide data showing the age, gender and history of comorbidity of all COVID-19 patients and suspected cases.“Such data will allow us to identify the age group and better prepare preventive and handling methods,” he said.Child Protection Commission (KPAI) chair Susanto regretted the death of minors from COVID-19, saying that all stakeholders must ensure that children are protected from coronavirus infection.He said that physical distancing measures must be seriously enforced. Even if schools have been suspended, parents must ensure their children stay at home and not play outside.Five known deathsLeaked data from the Health Ministry, obtained by the Post on Monday, reported that a 17-year-old male in West Java — recorded as Case 190 — died on March 18, making him the first fatality among people under 18 years in Indonesia.An 11-year-old girl who died in Pamekasan on Madura Island, East Java, earlier this month has since been confirmed as having tested positive for the disease, Pamekasan authorities stated on March 31.The girl died on March 20, only a day after she was admitted to hospital. Her second test result dated March 29 came back positive for COVID-19.The girl, however, also reportedly suffered from dengue fever. East Java COVID-19 task force curative team head Joni Wahyuhadi said the fatality was most likely caused by a combination of dengue fever and COVID-19.“Based on the report sent to us, the patient went through stage four of dengue hemorrhagic fever. She suffered dengue shock syndrome,” Joni told the Post on Wednesday, adding that the girl had been among the 1 percent of dengue fever patients who fell into dengue shock syndrome.Besides the confirmed cases, authorities also report at least three deaths of minors among suspected COVID-19 cases, one of whom was a baby.Last week, the COVID-19 spokesperson in Cianjur, West Java, Yusman Faisal told tempo.co that a “teenage girl” who was a patient under surveillance died on March 25 in the former athletes village currently being used as a hospital for those with mild symptoms in Kemayoran Jakarta.The West Kalimantan administration also reported on Tuesday the death of a 14-year-old in Kubu Raya regency, West Kalimantan. The child was suspected of having COVID-19.West Java Health Agency head Berli Hamdani told the Post on Wednesday that the province had recorded the deaths of two minors among suspected COVID-19 cases.“Yes, we recorded the deaths of a teenager and a baby,” he said, without elaborating further.It was not clear whether the teenager he mentioned was the girl from Cianjur or another case.He said the agency could not confirm whether they had died as a result of COVID-19 because like “many other deaths, there was a comorbidity factor”.“It’s also difficult to confirm as it requires an autopsy procedure to do so and this involves family permission, among other things,” he added.The global death rate among the age group of 10-19 years as of Tuesday was 0.2 percent, as opposed to 14.8 percent in people 80 years and older, according to Worldometer.Among the 685 cases provided in the leaked data, 11 patients were in the age group of 1-19 years, including the 17-year-old who died.The leaked data did not include the 11-year-old girl who died in Pamekasan.Arya Dipa contributed to this story from BandungTopics : Children’s rights organizations have called on the government to make public the ages of COVID-19 patients and pay more attention to the issue because COVID-19 is generally not supposed to kill healthy children. They also insist that the government should have made efforts to protect vulnerable children who had underlying conditions.Pay more attention to childrenUniversity of Indonesia (UI) epidemiologist Tri Yunis Miko Wahyono said that the death of a minor because of COVID-19 without any comorbidity was highly unusual. Comorbidity is a medical condition that co-occurs with another.“If a minor dies of COVID-19 without a comorbidity factor, it’s most likely because of poor handling. For example, if they’re not adequately treated during the early stages of the disease during which they only show mild symptoms,” he told the Post on Wednesday.last_img read more

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Remarks by Governor Wolf at 2019 Swearing-In Ceremony

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Remarks,  Videos Governor Tom WolfSecond Inaugural AddressTuesday, January 15, 2019State Capitol, Harrisburg, PATRANSCRIPT:Thank you!First – always first – I want to thank Frances, and our two wonderful daughters: Sarah and Katie. I love you, and I wouldn’t be here without you. I also want to thank Sarah and Katie’s husbands, our sons-in-law, Joe and Jamie. Thank you, Governors Ridge and Schweiker, for being here, and for your service and commitment to Pennsylvania.I’d also like to thank Chief Justice Saylor, Speaker Turzai, President Scarnati, Leader Cutler, Leader Dermody, Leader Corman, Leader Costa, and the members of our judiciary and general assembly for being here, as well as all of the family, friends, and invited guests who have made today so special.I’d like to say a special thank-you to Mike Stack for his hard work over the last four years. And I’d like to thank Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman for his commitment to public service, and for his friendship, as we tackle the next four years as partners. The tie looks good on you, John.Most of all, I want to thank the people of Pennsylvania. Thank you for the honor you have given me of serving as your Governor. Thank you for the inspiration you provide to me every day.Not too long ago, Frances and I got a call from our daughter Sarah. She had really good news. After years and years of what she’d probably call “hectoring” – but we’d call “gentle encouraging” – she and her husband, Joe, were finally moving back to Pennsylvania.When you have talented kids – and we do: Sarah’s an architect, Joe is a graphic designer and Katie’s a geologist and Jamie is running his own business – you always run the risk that they’re going to run off and do something great somewhere else. When I first took this oath four years ago, far too many parents across our state were worried that their kids would wind up moving away – that they would have to move away, if they were going to find the quality of life they desired.That anxiety cuts to the core. That’s not who we should be. We are not like any other state. We began as a Holy Experiment in tolerance and inclusion, and for more than 300 years, history has chosen us as its crucible. Pennsylvania is where America declared her independence. Pennsylvania is where our Founders wrote not one, but two constitutions, and sparked our nation’s evolving political experiment with those truths we hold to be self-evident but still seek to fully realize. Pennsylvania is where Lincoln came at America’s most vulnerable moment to eulogize the heroes of Gettysburg and call for a new birth of freedom that we still seek to fully implement for all Americans. And history is still being written right here in Pennsylvania. You see it when you visit the world-class universities and teaching hospitals where innovation is happening every day. You see on the farms and in the steel plants where our great work ethic is on display. You see it when you trace our evolution from dirt tracks to canals to rivers to railroads to highways Pennsylvania continues to be a place where history is made.So, a big part of who we are as Pennsylvanians is the pride we have in where we’re from. And we want to pass that pride down to our kids, so they can instill it in their children the way our parents instilled it in us.But when I spoke to you for the first time as Pennsylvania’s Governor, I spoke of a Commonwealth at a crossroads. We were still proud of our storied past, but the future had never looked more uncertain.You could look around and see the causes of that anxiety: an economy struggling to keep pace with rapid change, workers’ wages not keeping up with the skyrocketing cost of living, a budget deficit that threatened our fiscal future, a billion-dollar shortfall in education funding that was crippling our public schools.We were mired in a crisis of confidence, and for good reason: Parents no longer felt like they could promise their kids that Pennsylvania had opportunities to offer them – that their lives would be better than their own. Business owners no longer felt sure that the soil from which great companies had long grown was still fertile.And citizens of this great Commonwealth no longer trusted that our leaders could find common ground. Frankly, after so many failures, we no longer trusted them to do much of anything.It wasn’t a Republican or Democratic thing. It was a simple lack of faith in Harrisburg’s ability to solve problems in a way that put people first. Here, in the birthplace of American democracy, many of us had come to the conclusion that, no matter who we voted for, our government was simply broken beyond repair.Our continuous experiment in representative government embarked on by our founders became subject to doubt by far too many. That too many felt their promise of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness had become out of reach. And because of that, the challenges that we faced seemed insurmountable. Four years later, those challenges haven’t disappeared. But we’ve proven that those problems really aren’t insurmountable. Pennsylvania has created more than 200,000 new jobs – good jobs that support families.We’ve improved more than 20,000 miles of roadways and restored more than 1,900 bridges.We’ve restored $1 billion to our schools and enacted a fair funding formula to make sure that our children’s opportunities are not restricted by his or her zip code.We’ve turned a $2.5 billion deficit into a surplus and made the first deposit to our Rainy Day Fund in over a decade.We’ve expanded Medicaid to cover an additional 720,000 Pennsylvanians, and increased enrollment in the CHIP program so it now serves nearly 180,000 children.We’ve gotten more than 4,200 homeless veterans off the streets and into permanent housing and we’ve helped tens of thousands of seniors and people with disabilities get care in their homes.The graduation rate is up. The uninsured rate is down. Pre-K enrollment is up. Crime is down. We’ve got more people working and fewer people in prison. And while we’ve had plenty of fierce arguments in Harrisburg, that hasn’t stopped Democrats and Republicans from working together to legalize medical marijuana, modernize our liquor system, make our pets safer, and pass comprehensive pension reform that puts our fiscal future on sounder footing.Our differences haven’t stopped us from putting a down payment on criminal justice reform with the Clean Slate bill, instituting new protections against domestic violence, and passing our first gun safety law in decades.Look: We all come to public service with convictions that we know we can’t compromise. I certainly do. And I know my friends in the legislature do, as well. So sometimes we’ll disagree. And sometimes we’ll have to agree to disagree.But that doesn’t have to stop us from working together to make progress for Pennsylvania where we have common ground. As Leader Corman said, we’re not like Washington. We can work together here in Harrisburg. We can get things done.My fellow Pennsylvanians: We’ve gone from a Commonwealth at a crossroads to a Commonwealth on a comeback. And today, even as we reflect on our pride in the Pennsylvania we inherited from our parents, we can look forward to the future with renewed hope that we’ll leave an even better Pennsylvania for our children.Now, I’d love to take credit for all of that. Heck, while we’re at it, I’d love to take credit for the Eagles winning the Super Bowl, Villanova winning the Final Four – twice, and the Penguins bringing home the Stanley Cup – twice.But the accomplishments of the last four years aren’t my accomplishments. These are our accomplishments. Pennsylvanians have earned the right to feel optimistic about our future. And as we look forward to the next four years, I want us to be ambitious in imagining the Pennsylvania we can build together.A Pennsylvania where we continue to invest in our schools, where we continue to rebuild our infrastructure, where we continue to lead in research and development, where we continue to prioritize opportunity and prosperity for all of our communities and all of our children. Where we don’t wait around for Amazon to move here, because we’re building the next Amazon.A Pennsylvania where we don’t just have enough to take care of our own, but enough to take care of each other. Where people living in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh understand the importance of our agricultural sector and the needs of our rural communities. Where people living in McKean County appreciate the power of our world class cities. Where the business community recognizes the value of an energy policy that protects our environment and creates good jobs. Where we attack the opioid crisis that has taken so much from so many families.A Pennsylvania where we don’t just fondly recall William Penn’s commitment to tolerance, and the Founders’ civic spirit, and Lincoln’s political courage, but seek to emulate these heroes and reflect their values in our own time. Where we reform a criminal justice system that treats African Americans and the poor unjustly; where we stand as one to stop discrimination against the LGBTQ community, and where we commit to a process that makes our elections fairer and, where we give every Pennsylvanian the same chance to determine our shared future.I know this sounds like a lot to ask of a divided Harrisburg. And, the truth is, none of it is possible without trust.That’s why I’ve made transparency and ethics reform a top priority: implementing the gift ban, refusing to take a salary, cutting waste and red tape from state government, and saving billions in taxpayer money.But while I will continue this fight to make Harrisburg work for you, I’m not going to stand up here and ask you to forget about the lack of trust that came before. Some stains do take a long time to wash away.So I’m not asking Pennsylvanians to trust me, or any other politician in Harrisburg. I’m asking them to trust in themselves. Because that’s where I put my faith every day I wake up with the privilege of holding this office.Last October, on what was unquestionably the toughest day I’ve had in this office, Frances and I were in Beaver County when we got the news about the shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh. We raced the 45 minutes to the scene, but all I could do was share in the grief and agony of that horrible day. I remember seeing Mike Turzai and Jay Costa there, and in that moment, we weren’t Republicans or Democrats. And, for that matter, they weren’t legislative leaders and I wasn’t the Governor. We were just like everyone else, feeling helpless and heartbroken.But in the days that followed, the people of Pennsylvania lifted us all up. Law enforcement officers who had responded to the scene continued to do their jobs with the courage and grace and professionalism that makes them heroes. High school students from Taylor Allderdice organized an interfaith vigil that night, and more than 3,000 people showed up. The head of the local Islamic Society offered to provide guards to stand watch, so people could feel safe while they grieved the dead at memorial services in their synagogues. Thousands came from all across Pennsylvania to lay stones and show solidarity.I’m so grateful that you, Rabbi Myers, could be with us today. Your leadership and strength, along with so many others, showed us the way to move forward. We all came together. We all did what we could. We all leaned on each other. We all found the strength to carry on.That’s who we are. That’s the Pennsylvania I grew up in; the Pennsylvania Frances and I raised our family in; and that’s the Pennsylvania we should all want. Way back in 1749, Ben Franklin was sitting on the dock in Philadelphia, watching thousands of people stream off ships from Europe, most from Germany. Franklin wrote that he was worried about whether Pennsylvania could survive the arrival of so many German immigrants.Ben Franklin was right about a lot of things, but not about this. He should have had more faith in Pennsylvania. And I’m not just saying that because he was talking about my ancestors. Throughout its history, Pennsylvania has never been defined by one ethnicity, or one religion, or one ideology, or one region. We’ve always been diverse. And we’ve always been at the epicenter of change. From the American Revolution to the Civil War to the industrial revolution, from the days of steel and coal to the days of innovation and technology, Pennsylvania has been asked to adapt to change and respond to challenges, time and time again.That isn’t our curse. It’s our blessing. Our ability to come together again and again, across whatever boundaries may divide us, and renew this great political experiment for another generation – that’s what made Pennsylvania the place I’m so proud to be from.And now, we are challenged again. Challenged to re-imagine our workforce for a new century so that more of our children can find opportunity right here in Pennsylvania. Challenged to protect the progress we’ve made in restoring our schools and our fiscal security. Challenged to keep making our state stronger, and fairer, and more prosperous.I’m ready to do my part. But, today, I’m asking you, the people of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, to do your part, as well. In this last election, we saw increased voter turnout in all 67 counties. But voting isn’t the end of your responsibility in helping to shape our shared future. It’s just the beginning. It’s long past time we re-discover democracy together – because if we’re going to build the kind of trust we need to make progress in Harrisburg. . . if we’re going to renew our faith in Pennsylvania’s future. . . it won’t come from me or anyone else on this stage. It’ll come from you, the people of this great Commonwealth.So, today, I ask you to choose hope over hopelessness, empathy over apathy. I ask you to choose action over passivity. I ask you to take the future of our Commonwealth into your own hands and help lead us forward.My fellow Pennsylvanians, no longer are we stuck at a crossroads. We have chosen a path of progress. We have earned the right to feel not just proud of our past, but hopeful for our future.So, let us have faith in each other.Let us have faith in what we can fix together, what we can achieve together – what we can build together.Thank you, and God bless you! And God bless the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. January 15, 2019center_img Remarks by Governor Wolf at 2019 Swearing-In Ceremonylast_img read more

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Sarri: Messi having more Ballons d’Or than Ronaldo is ‘really annoying’

first_img The pair were tied on five titles each until Messi won the 2019 award back in December. Ronaldo finished third: The Portuguese forward has started the new year in brilliant form, scoring four goals in two appearances, including his first hat-trick for Juve in Serie A: Loading… Juventus manager Maurizio Sarri has said “it’s really annoying” that Barcelona superstar Lionel Messi has one more Ballon d’Or award to his name than Cristiano Ronaldo. Promoted ContentWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?The Highest Paid Football Players In The WorldCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?8 Things You Didn’t Know About CoffeeWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty Penny10 Phones That Can Work For Weeks Without RechargingThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic Bombs9 Most Epic Movie Robots We’ve Ever Seen If Ronaldo can continue his current goalscoring form and help Juve to win the Champions League, and edge out Inter Milan in a tight title race, he will be in the running for a sixth Ballon d’Or gong come the end of 2020. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Sarri, who took over as Old Lady boss in the summer, wants to help Ronaldo join Messi on six Ballons d’Or, per Sacha Pisani of Goal: “I would like to help Cristiano win the sixth Ballon d’Or first. It’s really annoying thinking that someone won more [Ballons d’Or] than him. I think about him, and I think helping him, it is my goal and the goal of the team. It is right for him.” Four of Ronaldo’s five Ballon d’Or awards have been won in years in which he has led his former clubs, Manchester United and Real Madrid, to UEFA Champions League glory. That will be his and Sarri’s aim this term, as well as winning a ninth consecutive Serie A title for Juve. Despite being one of Europe’s biggest clubs, the Old Lady have a relatively poor record in the Champions League. Read Also:I’m a huge fan of Ronaldo – hip-hop star Davido After topping Group D in the 2019-20 tournament, Juve have drawn Lyon in the last 16, an eminently winnable tie for a side of their quality: They have won the famous trophy twice, but their last triumph was in 1996. Since then, Juve have lost five finals in Europe’s most prestigious tournament to take their tally of runners-up places to a record seven. One of the key reasons Ronaldo, 34, was signed for £100 million from Real in July 2018 was to help the Old Lady finally go all the way in the Champions League.last_img read more

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Batesville Pre-Sale Tickets For The 2014 Reds Futures Showcase

first_imgBatesville Varsity Baseball pre-sale tickets for the “2014 Red’s Futures Showcase.Event:    2014 Cincinnati Red’s/Skyline Chili “FUTURES” ShowcaseDate:        Wednesday, April 2, 2014Location:    Harrison, Ohio High SchoolGames:    Batesville vs South Dearborn    4:30 PMLawrenceburg vs Harrison    7:00 PMAdmission:    $5.00  (Adults and Students)Children 5 years and younger will be admitted free.Pre-sale:    $5.00    (We have a limit of 50 tickets available.)* With each pre-sale (only) game ticket purchased, you will also receive:1. A coupon for a FREE Skyline Chili Cheese Coney  AND2.  A voucher for a FREE 2014 Cincinnati Red’s ticket.  (Limited game selection)Pre-Sale tickets are available in the Batesville High School athletic office.  They may be purchased from 7:30 AM to 4:00 PM during school days starting Monday, March 7ththrough Tuesday, April 1st.Submitted by Batesville AD Mark Ferguson.last_img read more

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Kathleen “Kay” Turner

first_imgKathleen W. “Kay” Turner, 87, of Lawrenceburg, Indiana, passed away Wednesday, February 14, 2018.She was born May 1, 1930 in Moores Hill, IN, daughter of the late Forest F. and Dorthea Shaw Craven.Kay worked as a Teachers Aid for Lawrenceburg School System. She was a member of the Bible Baptist Church, Greendale Indiana.She enjoyed Bingo, and was an avid sports fan, especially of the Cincinnati Reds, IU (she loved Bobby Knight) and the Indianapolis Colts. She raised 7 children and loved spending time with her loving family. Surviving are children, Beverly (Butch) Miller of Cleves, OH, Kenneth (Mary) Johnson of Madison, IN, Pamela (Anthony) Graff of Aurora, IN, Mary Ann (Dennis) Carr of Lawrenceburg, IN, James (Mary) Johnson of Kempner, TX, William D. (Cam) Turner of Florence, KY; sisters, Mary Alice (late Bud) Farrell of Splendora, TX. and Florence (late Kyle) Clark of Alexandria, KY, 14 grandchildren, 21 great-grandchildren and 6 great, great-grandchildren.She was preceded in death by her parents, husbands, William D. Turner and joseph W. Johnson; son, Robert J. Johnson, grandson, George Fray and brother, Forest Junior Craven.Friends will be received Monday, February 19, 2018, 11:00 am – 1:00 pm at the Rullman Hunger Funeral Home, Aurora, Indiana.Services will be held at the funeral home at 1:00 pm immediately following visitation.Interment will follow in the Eastview Cemetery, Patriot, Indiana.Contributions may be made to the Bible Baptist Church or Our Hospice of South Central Indiana. If unable to attend services, please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

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