Govt fails to confirm at least five minors among COVID-19 fatalities

first_imgIn the month since the first COVID-19 case was identified in Indonesia, the country has recorded at least five minors among the deaths of people infected with or suspected of being infected with COVID-19.The government’s official data, however, has so far not acknowledged that any deaths among minors have occurred. The information The Jakarta Post has obtained is either from leaked data or from regional administrations that has not been confirmed by the central government.The data is scattered and not all of it has complete information regarding whether the children were healthy prior to infection or had other underlying conditions. Director of Save the Children Indonesia Tata Sudrajat said the government must pay more attention to minors, especially minors who have a history of comorbidity.“It is commonly known that the elderly with underlying illnesses are the most vulnerable to COVID-19. Children with illnesses, however, have not been a concern,” he told the Post on Wednesday.To address the matter, Tata said, the government must first and foremost provide data showing the age, gender and history of comorbidity of all COVID-19 patients and suspected cases.“Such data will allow us to identify the age group and better prepare preventive and handling methods,” he said.Child Protection Commission (KPAI) chair Susanto regretted the death of minors from COVID-19, saying that all stakeholders must ensure that children are protected from coronavirus infection.He said that physical distancing measures must be seriously enforced. Even if schools have been suspended, parents must ensure their children stay at home and not play outside.Five known deathsLeaked data from the Health Ministry, obtained by the Post on Monday, reported that a 17-year-old male in West Java — recorded as Case 190 — died on March 18, making him the first fatality among people under 18 years in Indonesia.An 11-year-old girl who died in Pamekasan on Madura Island, East Java, earlier this month has since been confirmed as having tested positive for the disease, Pamekasan authorities stated on March 31.The girl died on March 20, only a day after she was admitted to hospital. Her second test result dated March 29 came back positive for COVID-19.The girl, however, also reportedly suffered from dengue fever. East Java COVID-19 task force curative team head Joni Wahyuhadi said the fatality was most likely caused by a combination of dengue fever and COVID-19.“Based on the report sent to us, the patient went through stage four of dengue hemorrhagic fever. She suffered dengue shock syndrome,” Joni told the Post on Wednesday, adding that the girl had been among the 1 percent of dengue fever patients who fell into dengue shock syndrome.Besides the confirmed cases, authorities also report at least three deaths of minors among suspected COVID-19 cases, one of whom was a baby.Last week, the COVID-19 spokesperson in Cianjur, West Java, Yusman Faisal told tempo.co that a “teenage girl” who was a patient under surveillance died on March 25 in the former athletes village currently being used as a hospital for those with mild symptoms in Kemayoran Jakarta.The West Kalimantan administration also reported on Tuesday the death of a 14-year-old in Kubu Raya regency, West Kalimantan. The child was suspected of having COVID-19.West Java Health Agency head Berli Hamdani told the Post on Wednesday that the province had recorded the deaths of two minors among suspected COVID-19 cases.“Yes, we recorded the deaths of a teenager and a baby,” he said, without elaborating further.It was not clear whether the teenager he mentioned was the girl from Cianjur or another case.He said the agency could not confirm whether they had died as a result of COVID-19 because like “many other deaths, there was a comorbidity factor”.“It’s also difficult to confirm as it requires an autopsy procedure to do so and this involves family permission, among other things,” he added.The global death rate among the age group of 10-19 years as of Tuesday was 0.2 percent, as opposed to 14.8 percent in people 80 years and older, according to Worldometer.Among the 685 cases provided in the leaked data, 11 patients were in the age group of 1-19 years, including the 17-year-old who died.The leaked data did not include the 11-year-old girl who died in Pamekasan.Arya Dipa contributed to this story from BandungTopics : Children’s rights organizations have called on the government to make public the ages of COVID-19 patients and pay more attention to the issue because COVID-19 is generally not supposed to kill healthy children. They also insist that the government should have made efforts to protect vulnerable children who had underlying conditions.Pay more attention to childrenUniversity of Indonesia (UI) epidemiologist Tri Yunis Miko Wahyono said that the death of a minor because of COVID-19 without any comorbidity was highly unusual. Comorbidity is a medical condition that co-occurs with another.“If a minor dies of COVID-19 without a comorbidity factor, it’s most likely because of poor handling. For example, if they’re not adequately treated during the early stages of the disease during which they only show mild symptoms,” he told the Post on Wednesday.last_img read more

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Remarks by Governor Wolf at 2019 Swearing-In Ceremony

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Remarks,  Videos Governor Tom WolfSecond Inaugural AddressTuesday, January 15, 2019State Capitol, Harrisburg, PATRANSCRIPT:Thank you!First – always first – I want to thank Frances, and our two wonderful daughters: Sarah and Katie. I love you, and I wouldn’t be here without you. I also want to thank Sarah and Katie’s husbands, our sons-in-law, Joe and Jamie. Thank you, Governors Ridge and Schweiker, for being here, and for your service and commitment to Pennsylvania.I’d also like to thank Chief Justice Saylor, Speaker Turzai, President Scarnati, Leader Cutler, Leader Dermody, Leader Corman, Leader Costa, and the members of our judiciary and general assembly for being here, as well as all of the family, friends, and invited guests who have made today so special.I’d like to say a special thank-you to Mike Stack for his hard work over the last four years. And I’d like to thank Lieutenant Governor John Fetterman for his commitment to public service, and for his friendship, as we tackle the next four years as partners. The tie looks good on you, John.Most of all, I want to thank the people of Pennsylvania. Thank you for the honor you have given me of serving as your Governor. Thank you for the inspiration you provide to me every day.Not too long ago, Frances and I got a call from our daughter Sarah. She had really good news. After years and years of what she’d probably call “hectoring” – but we’d call “gentle encouraging” – she and her husband, Joe, were finally moving back to Pennsylvania.When you have talented kids – and we do: Sarah’s an architect, Joe is a graphic designer and Katie’s a geologist and Jamie is running his own business – you always run the risk that they’re going to run off and do something great somewhere else. When I first took this oath four years ago, far too many parents across our state were worried that their kids would wind up moving away – that they would have to move away, if they were going to find the quality of life they desired.That anxiety cuts to the core. That’s not who we should be. We are not like any other state. We began as a Holy Experiment in tolerance and inclusion, and for more than 300 years, history has chosen us as its crucible. Pennsylvania is where America declared her independence. Pennsylvania is where our Founders wrote not one, but two constitutions, and sparked our nation’s evolving political experiment with those truths we hold to be self-evident but still seek to fully realize. Pennsylvania is where Lincoln came at America’s most vulnerable moment to eulogize the heroes of Gettysburg and call for a new birth of freedom that we still seek to fully implement for all Americans. And history is still being written right here in Pennsylvania. You see it when you visit the world-class universities and teaching hospitals where innovation is happening every day. You see on the farms and in the steel plants where our great work ethic is on display. You see it when you trace our evolution from dirt tracks to canals to rivers to railroads to highways Pennsylvania continues to be a place where history is made.So, a big part of who we are as Pennsylvanians is the pride we have in where we’re from. And we want to pass that pride down to our kids, so they can instill it in their children the way our parents instilled it in us.But when I spoke to you for the first time as Pennsylvania’s Governor, I spoke of a Commonwealth at a crossroads. We were still proud of our storied past, but the future had never looked more uncertain.You could look around and see the causes of that anxiety: an economy struggling to keep pace with rapid change, workers’ wages not keeping up with the skyrocketing cost of living, a budget deficit that threatened our fiscal future, a billion-dollar shortfall in education funding that was crippling our public schools.We were mired in a crisis of confidence, and for good reason: Parents no longer felt like they could promise their kids that Pennsylvania had opportunities to offer them – that their lives would be better than their own. Business owners no longer felt sure that the soil from which great companies had long grown was still fertile.And citizens of this great Commonwealth no longer trusted that our leaders could find common ground. Frankly, after so many failures, we no longer trusted them to do much of anything.It wasn’t a Republican or Democratic thing. It was a simple lack of faith in Harrisburg’s ability to solve problems in a way that put people first. Here, in the birthplace of American democracy, many of us had come to the conclusion that, no matter who we voted for, our government was simply broken beyond repair.Our continuous experiment in representative government embarked on by our founders became subject to doubt by far too many. That too many felt their promise of life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness had become out of reach. And because of that, the challenges that we faced seemed insurmountable. Four years later, those challenges haven’t disappeared. But we’ve proven that those problems really aren’t insurmountable. Pennsylvania has created more than 200,000 new jobs – good jobs that support families.We’ve improved more than 20,000 miles of roadways and restored more than 1,900 bridges.We’ve restored $1 billion to our schools and enacted a fair funding formula to make sure that our children’s opportunities are not restricted by his or her zip code.We’ve turned a $2.5 billion deficit into a surplus and made the first deposit to our Rainy Day Fund in over a decade.We’ve expanded Medicaid to cover an additional 720,000 Pennsylvanians, and increased enrollment in the CHIP program so it now serves nearly 180,000 children.We’ve gotten more than 4,200 homeless veterans off the streets and into permanent housing and we’ve helped tens of thousands of seniors and people with disabilities get care in their homes.The graduation rate is up. The uninsured rate is down. Pre-K enrollment is up. Crime is down. We’ve got more people working and fewer people in prison. And while we’ve had plenty of fierce arguments in Harrisburg, that hasn’t stopped Democrats and Republicans from working together to legalize medical marijuana, modernize our liquor system, make our pets safer, and pass comprehensive pension reform that puts our fiscal future on sounder footing.Our differences haven’t stopped us from putting a down payment on criminal justice reform with the Clean Slate bill, instituting new protections against domestic violence, and passing our first gun safety law in decades.Look: We all come to public service with convictions that we know we can’t compromise. I certainly do. And I know my friends in the legislature do, as well. So sometimes we’ll disagree. And sometimes we’ll have to agree to disagree.But that doesn’t have to stop us from working together to make progress for Pennsylvania where we have common ground. As Leader Corman said, we’re not like Washington. We can work together here in Harrisburg. We can get things done.My fellow Pennsylvanians: We’ve gone from a Commonwealth at a crossroads to a Commonwealth on a comeback. And today, even as we reflect on our pride in the Pennsylvania we inherited from our parents, we can look forward to the future with renewed hope that we’ll leave an even better Pennsylvania for our children.Now, I’d love to take credit for all of that. Heck, while we’re at it, I’d love to take credit for the Eagles winning the Super Bowl, Villanova winning the Final Four – twice, and the Penguins bringing home the Stanley Cup – twice.But the accomplishments of the last four years aren’t my accomplishments. These are our accomplishments. Pennsylvanians have earned the right to feel optimistic about our future. And as we look forward to the next four years, I want us to be ambitious in imagining the Pennsylvania we can build together.A Pennsylvania where we continue to invest in our schools, where we continue to rebuild our infrastructure, where we continue to lead in research and development, where we continue to prioritize opportunity and prosperity for all of our communities and all of our children. Where we don’t wait around for Amazon to move here, because we’re building the next Amazon.A Pennsylvania where we don’t just have enough to take care of our own, but enough to take care of each other. Where people living in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh understand the importance of our agricultural sector and the needs of our rural communities. Where people living in McKean County appreciate the power of our world class cities. Where the business community recognizes the value of an energy policy that protects our environment and creates good jobs. Where we attack the opioid crisis that has taken so much from so many families.A Pennsylvania where we don’t just fondly recall William Penn’s commitment to tolerance, and the Founders’ civic spirit, and Lincoln’s political courage, but seek to emulate these heroes and reflect their values in our own time. Where we reform a criminal justice system that treats African Americans and the poor unjustly; where we stand as one to stop discrimination against the LGBTQ community, and where we commit to a process that makes our elections fairer and, where we give every Pennsylvanian the same chance to determine our shared future.I know this sounds like a lot to ask of a divided Harrisburg. And, the truth is, none of it is possible without trust.That’s why I’ve made transparency and ethics reform a top priority: implementing the gift ban, refusing to take a salary, cutting waste and red tape from state government, and saving billions in taxpayer money.But while I will continue this fight to make Harrisburg work for you, I’m not going to stand up here and ask you to forget about the lack of trust that came before. Some stains do take a long time to wash away.So I’m not asking Pennsylvanians to trust me, or any other politician in Harrisburg. I’m asking them to trust in themselves. Because that’s where I put my faith every day I wake up with the privilege of holding this office.Last October, on what was unquestionably the toughest day I’ve had in this office, Frances and I were in Beaver County when we got the news about the shooting at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh. We raced the 45 minutes to the scene, but all I could do was share in the grief and agony of that horrible day. I remember seeing Mike Turzai and Jay Costa there, and in that moment, we weren’t Republicans or Democrats. And, for that matter, they weren’t legislative leaders and I wasn’t the Governor. We were just like everyone else, feeling helpless and heartbroken.But in the days that followed, the people of Pennsylvania lifted us all up. Law enforcement officers who had responded to the scene continued to do their jobs with the courage and grace and professionalism that makes them heroes. High school students from Taylor Allderdice organized an interfaith vigil that night, and more than 3,000 people showed up. The head of the local Islamic Society offered to provide guards to stand watch, so people could feel safe while they grieved the dead at memorial services in their synagogues. Thousands came from all across Pennsylvania to lay stones and show solidarity.I’m so grateful that you, Rabbi Myers, could be with us today. Your leadership and strength, along with so many others, showed us the way to move forward. We all came together. We all did what we could. We all leaned on each other. We all found the strength to carry on.That’s who we are. That’s the Pennsylvania I grew up in; the Pennsylvania Frances and I raised our family in; and that’s the Pennsylvania we should all want. Way back in 1749, Ben Franklin was sitting on the dock in Philadelphia, watching thousands of people stream off ships from Europe, most from Germany. Franklin wrote that he was worried about whether Pennsylvania could survive the arrival of so many German immigrants.Ben Franklin was right about a lot of things, but not about this. He should have had more faith in Pennsylvania. And I’m not just saying that because he was talking about my ancestors. Throughout its history, Pennsylvania has never been defined by one ethnicity, or one religion, or one ideology, or one region. We’ve always been diverse. And we’ve always been at the epicenter of change. From the American Revolution to the Civil War to the industrial revolution, from the days of steel and coal to the days of innovation and technology, Pennsylvania has been asked to adapt to change and respond to challenges, time and time again.That isn’t our curse. It’s our blessing. Our ability to come together again and again, across whatever boundaries may divide us, and renew this great political experiment for another generation – that’s what made Pennsylvania the place I’m so proud to be from.And now, we are challenged again. Challenged to re-imagine our workforce for a new century so that more of our children can find opportunity right here in Pennsylvania. Challenged to protect the progress we’ve made in restoring our schools and our fiscal security. Challenged to keep making our state stronger, and fairer, and more prosperous.I’m ready to do my part. But, today, I’m asking you, the people of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, to do your part, as well. In this last election, we saw increased voter turnout in all 67 counties. But voting isn’t the end of your responsibility in helping to shape our shared future. It’s just the beginning. It’s long past time we re-discover democracy together – because if we’re going to build the kind of trust we need to make progress in Harrisburg. . . if we’re going to renew our faith in Pennsylvania’s future. . . it won’t come from me or anyone else on this stage. It’ll come from you, the people of this great Commonwealth.So, today, I ask you to choose hope over hopelessness, empathy over apathy. I ask you to choose action over passivity. I ask you to take the future of our Commonwealth into your own hands and help lead us forward.My fellow Pennsylvanians, no longer are we stuck at a crossroads. We have chosen a path of progress. We have earned the right to feel not just proud of our past, but hopeful for our future.So, let us have faith in each other.Let us have faith in what we can fix together, what we can achieve together – what we can build together.Thank you, and God bless you! And God bless the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. January 15, 2019center_img Remarks by Governor Wolf at 2019 Swearing-In Ceremonylast_img read more

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Sarri: Messi having more Ballons d’Or than Ronaldo is ‘really annoying’

first_img The pair were tied on five titles each until Messi won the 2019 award back in December. Ronaldo finished third: The Portuguese forward has started the new year in brilliant form, scoring four goals in two appearances, including his first hat-trick for Juve in Serie A: Loading… Juventus manager Maurizio Sarri has said “it’s really annoying” that Barcelona superstar Lionel Messi has one more Ballon d’Or award to his name than Cristiano Ronaldo. Promoted ContentWho Is The Most Powerful Woman On Earth?The Highest Paid Football Players In The WorldCouples Who Celebrated Their Union In A Unique, Unforgettable WayWho Earns More Than Ronaldo?8 Things You Didn’t Know About CoffeeWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?7 Universities Where Getting An Education Costs A Hefty Penny10 Phones That Can Work For Weeks Without RechargingThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever MadeA Hurricane Can Be As Powerful As 10 Atomic Bombs9 Most Epic Movie Robots We’ve Ever Seen If Ronaldo can continue his current goalscoring form and help Juve to win the Champions League, and edge out Inter Milan in a tight title race, he will be in the running for a sixth Ballon d’Or gong come the end of 2020. FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 center_img Sarri, who took over as Old Lady boss in the summer, wants to help Ronaldo join Messi on six Ballons d’Or, per Sacha Pisani of Goal: “I would like to help Cristiano win the sixth Ballon d’Or first. It’s really annoying thinking that someone won more [Ballons d’Or] than him. I think about him, and I think helping him, it is my goal and the goal of the team. It is right for him.” Four of Ronaldo’s five Ballon d’Or awards have been won in years in which he has led his former clubs, Manchester United and Real Madrid, to UEFA Champions League glory. That will be his and Sarri’s aim this term, as well as winning a ninth consecutive Serie A title for Juve. Despite being one of Europe’s biggest clubs, the Old Lady have a relatively poor record in the Champions League. Read Also:I’m a huge fan of Ronaldo – hip-hop star Davido After topping Group D in the 2019-20 tournament, Juve have drawn Lyon in the last 16, an eminently winnable tie for a side of their quality: They have won the famous trophy twice, but their last triumph was in 1996. Since then, Juve have lost five finals in Europe’s most prestigious tournament to take their tally of runners-up places to a record seven. One of the key reasons Ronaldo, 34, was signed for £100 million from Real in July 2018 was to help the Old Lady finally go all the way in the Champions League.last_img read more

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Batesville Pre-Sale Tickets For The 2014 Reds Futures Showcase

first_imgBatesville Varsity Baseball pre-sale tickets for the “2014 Red’s Futures Showcase.Event:    2014 Cincinnati Red’s/Skyline Chili “FUTURES” ShowcaseDate:        Wednesday, April 2, 2014Location:    Harrison, Ohio High SchoolGames:    Batesville vs South Dearborn    4:30 PMLawrenceburg vs Harrison    7:00 PMAdmission:    $5.00  (Adults and Students)Children 5 years and younger will be admitted free.Pre-sale:    $5.00    (We have a limit of 50 tickets available.)* With each pre-sale (only) game ticket purchased, you will also receive:1. A coupon for a FREE Skyline Chili Cheese Coney  AND2.  A voucher for a FREE 2014 Cincinnati Red’s ticket.  (Limited game selection)Pre-Sale tickets are available in the Batesville High School athletic office.  They may be purchased from 7:30 AM to 4:00 PM during school days starting Monday, March 7ththrough Tuesday, April 1st.Submitted by Batesville AD Mark Ferguson.last_img read more

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Kathleen “Kay” Turner

first_imgKathleen W. “Kay” Turner, 87, of Lawrenceburg, Indiana, passed away Wednesday, February 14, 2018.She was born May 1, 1930 in Moores Hill, IN, daughter of the late Forest F. and Dorthea Shaw Craven.Kay worked as a Teachers Aid for Lawrenceburg School System. She was a member of the Bible Baptist Church, Greendale Indiana.She enjoyed Bingo, and was an avid sports fan, especially of the Cincinnati Reds, IU (she loved Bobby Knight) and the Indianapolis Colts. She raised 7 children and loved spending time with her loving family. Surviving are children, Beverly (Butch) Miller of Cleves, OH, Kenneth (Mary) Johnson of Madison, IN, Pamela (Anthony) Graff of Aurora, IN, Mary Ann (Dennis) Carr of Lawrenceburg, IN, James (Mary) Johnson of Kempner, TX, William D. (Cam) Turner of Florence, KY; sisters, Mary Alice (late Bud) Farrell of Splendora, TX. and Florence (late Kyle) Clark of Alexandria, KY, 14 grandchildren, 21 great-grandchildren and 6 great, great-grandchildren.She was preceded in death by her parents, husbands, William D. Turner and joseph W. Johnson; son, Robert J. Johnson, grandson, George Fray and brother, Forest Junior Craven.Friends will be received Monday, February 19, 2018, 11:00 am – 1:00 pm at the Rullman Hunger Funeral Home, Aurora, Indiana.Services will be held at the funeral home at 1:00 pm immediately following visitation.Interment will follow in the Eastview Cemetery, Patriot, Indiana.Contributions may be made to the Bible Baptist Church or Our Hospice of South Central Indiana. If unable to attend services, please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

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Harris makes like lightning at Dixieland

first_imgAnthony Harris won the Virginia Sprint Series feature at Dixieland Speedway Friday night. (Photo by Jim Haines)By Jim HainesELIZABETH CITY, N.C. (July 14) – Almost as fast as the lightning all around the track, Anthony Harris bolted to the Friday night Virginia Sprint Series win at Dixieland Speedway.After the track promoter flipped the race program to get the traveling IMCA RaceSaver Sprint Cars on the track earlier on the program, Daren Bolac took the early lead with Anthony Linkenhoker and Harris in hot pursuitHarris took over second then got the front spot when Bolac made contact with another car.Troy Severin and Brian Lawson gave chase but neither could catch Harris in time to deny him his third series win of the season.Feature results – 1. Anthony Harris; 2. Troy Severin; 3. Brian Lawson; 4. Mike Leraas; 5. An­thony Linkenhoker; 6. Chris Ware; 7. Charlie Ware; 8. Bill Rice; 9. Mike Keeton; 10. Daren Bolac; 11. French Grimes Jr.last_img read more

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It’s Alive!! Weird “Blob” Debuts at Paris Zoo

first_imgIt looks like a fungus but acts like an animal, and that it has no mouth or stomach but can detect food and digest it.The Blob can also move without legs, and if you cut it in half it will heal itself in two minutes.It also has no brain and yet it can learn.The director of the Paris Zoological Park says if you merge two blobs together, one will transmit its knowledge to the other. “We know for sure it is not a plant but we don’t really if it’s an animal or a fungus,” said David.“It behaves very surprisingly for something that looks like a mushroom (…) it has the behavior of an animal, it is able to learn.” (Paris) — Slime mold is part of a new exhibit at a Paris zoo.The moving slime mold contains more than 900 species and can heal itself within minutes, yet is does not have any neurons.The yellowish mold has been called “The Blob” because of its characteristics. This newest exhibit of the Paris Zoological Park, which goes on display to the public on Saturday, has no mouth, no stomach, no eyes, yet it can detect food and digest it.The blob also has almost 720 sexes, can move without legs or wings and heals itself in two minutes if cut in half.“The blob is a living being which belongs to one of nature’s mysteries”, said Bruno David, director of the Paris Museum of Natural History, of which the Zoological Park is part. A Paris zoo has unveiled a mysterious new organism which they call a ‘blob.’ The yellowish unicellular living being looks like a fungus but acts like an animal https://t.co/ukj0mgqf9a pic.twitter.com/DVaR3RdqXZ— Reuters Top News (@Reuters) October 17, 2019last_img read more

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NO BITE: Punchless SU offense fails to reach end zone in loss to Huskies

first_img Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Published on November 19, 2010 at 12:00 pmcenter_img Ryan Nassib realized he had made a mistake as he saw the ball bouncing freely on the turf. The mistake that he admits was the turning point. With 4:45 remaining in the third quarter as Syracuse still hung around in a Big East clash against rival Connecticut, the SU quarterback attempted to get rid of the football to avoid a sack. Before he could do that, UConn’s Kendal Reyes came crashing in, jarring the ball loose.  Two plays and four yards later, the Huskies took a two-possession lead. ‘It was very devastating,’ Nassib said. ‘It was a big mistake on my part and really was a turning point in our game. I was just trying to make a play.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder text The fumble was far from the only offensive flaw for Syracuse (7-4, 4-3 Big East) Saturday. In a game full of poor offensive execution, Nassib’s turnover typified SU’s 20-6 loss to the Huskies (6-4, 3-2) in front of 41,465 inside the Carrier Dome. Costly turnovers combined with an inability to move the ball and put points on the board contributed to SU’s worst offensive performance of the season. With the loss, the Orange officially eliminated itself from a potential share of the Big East title. ‘There were some plays that were there that we wish we could’ve made and we just didn’t,’ quarterbacks coach and offensive playcaller Nathaniel Hackett said. ‘We knew what we were going to get, and it just didn’t happen. And it was obvious throughout the game.’  Syracuse has relied on its ninth-ranked defense to bail out its inconsistent, sputtering offense at times this season. On the road against South Florida and last week at Rutgers, the Orange still came away with wins despite an offense that showed difficulty moving the ball and putting points on the board. At some point, SU’s offensive miscues were going to be too costly, too consequential and too much to overcome — even for the second-best defense in the Big East. ‘The defense has been playing balls to the wall all season,’ running back Antwon Bailey said. ‘Some of it has to fall on the offense. We’ve got to take control. We have to put some points on the board.’ On SU’s first offensive play, receiver Van Chew had a step on his man streaking down the right sideline. But Nassib overthrew him. Other times, big offensive plays were nullified by penalties and inconsistency that followed the plays. Perhaps the most frustrating aspect, Hackett said, was the fact that Syracuse knew exactly what UConn was going to do defensively. In addition, the Huskies were the worst defense in the conference coming into the game. ‘It’s horrible,’ Hackett said. ‘And unfortunately it started with that first play. … It was a roller coaster all day. Something would look really good and we’d get a big gain, and then we’d get stuffed or a penalty. And that’s been the story lately. It’s frustrating, very frustrating.’ With the SU defense holding the Huskies in check, the task eventually became too overwhelming. Unable to move the ball with any efficiency, the Orange offense put its defensive counterparts in tough situations time and time again. UConn’s 13 second-half points came off  just 44 yards of total offense. And when Syracuse was able to move the ball, dropped passes and missed blocks equaled missed opportunities for points.  ‘We’re definitely repeat offenders of not executing when we need to and it’s something that we need to change as an offense,’running back Delone Carter said. For the first time all season, Nassib failed to toss a touchdown pass. A pair of Ross Krautman field goals were the only thing separating the Orange from being shut out in its Big East finale.  The problems that existed with the offense at South Florida aren’t going away. There isn’t a quick fix to what has become a concerning issue during the second half of the season for SU. And it cost the Orange once again against Connecticut. Said Nassib: ‘It’s really just a lack of focus as an offense as a whole.’ aljohn@syr.edulast_img read more

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Jamaica to host climate change symposium

first_imgBabsy Grange Jamaica will host the Caribbean’s first ever symposium on Climate Change and World Heritage in May.Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Olivia Grange, made the announcement during her message to mark World Heritage Day being celebrated on April 18, under the theme, ‘Cultural Heritage and Sustainable Tourism’.Coming out of the symposium will be best practices to safeguard heritage sites based on the impact of climate change, Grange said.She added that the decision to host the symposium was part of the ministry’s strategic thrust to strengthen Jamaica’s presence in World Heritage.“We recognise the importance of cultural heritage in our nation’s development and the impact that climate change can have on heritage sites. Through the symposium we will be able to coordinate efforts and resources in the Caribbean to improve awareness and collaboration in preserving and safeguarding our tangible and intangible heritage resources,” Grange said.The symposium will bring together forty delegates from 12 Caribbean nations with existing World Heritage properties, as well as policy makers and experts involved in Climate Change.Funding support is provided through the Jamaica National Commission for UNESCO – Participatory Project, UNESCO Kingston Cluster Office for the Caribbean and the Climate Change Division of the Ministry of Economic Growth and Job Creation.last_img read more

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Official: James Rodriguez Completes Bayern Munich Move

first_imgRummenigge continued: “James is a very versatile player. He’s a goalscorer himself, he sets up a lot of goals and on top of that, he’s great from set-pieces. There’s no question that this transfer further increases the quality in our team.”The 2014 World Cup top scorer will join Bayern squad for their 12-day Audi Summer Tour to China and Singapore on Sunday.RelatedReal Madrid Survive Bayern Onslaught To Qualify For 3rd Successive UCL FinalMay 1, 2018In “Europe”Russia 2018: Top 10 Players To WatchJune 7, 2018In “World Cup”Cristiano Ronaldo Challenges Messi to Leave SpainDecember 10, 2018In “Europe” “We’re delighted we’ve been able to complete this transfer. Signing James Rodríguez was our coach Carlo Ancelotti’s biggest wish, following their successful spell working together in Madrid,” Bayern Munich chairman Karl-Heinz Rummenigge told the club’s official website. Real Madrid’s midfielder, James Rodriguez has completed a two-year loan deal moved to Bayern Munich.The 25-year-old Colombia international signed for Real Madrid for £71m in 2014, and have been linked with a move away from the Bernabeu after he was left out of Real’s Champions League final squad, with Inter Milan, Chelsea and Manchester United being potential suitors.Speaking at his first press conference at the club, James said: “I am very happy to be here.”“I am very happy to be the first Colombian to play for Bayern, I want to make history here!”“I can play on the left, on the right or as a number 10. I will have to fight for my starting place.”center_img The Colombian captain will now reunite with his former boss at Real Madrid, Carlo Ancelotti, who brought the Colombian captain from Monaco to the Spanish capital.last_img read more

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