Who is Cheslin Kolbe: Ten things you should know about the South Africa wing

first_img Cheslin Kolbe celebrates after scoring in the 2019 Rugby World Cup final (Getty Images) Cheslin Kolbe, arguably the best player in the world right now, cleaning up rubbish around the pitch at Thomond Park after full-time…This is what it’s all about #HeinekenChampionsCup pic.twitter.com/LviV26kFiW— Rugby on BT Sport (@btsportrugby) April 3, 20219. Kolbe is a philanthropist and works with the Be The Difference Foundation in 2014. The organisation tries to tackle poverty in the Western Cape and fed 400 people a week at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic lockdown in South Africa.10. While careful with his money, Kolbe told Rugby World that his main vice was collecting watches – he owns 12 in all! Expand 4. His rugby hero when growing up was South African centre Adrian Jacobs, who was also from Kraaifontein. Jacobs started the first two Tests at outside-centre during the 2009 Lions tour of South Africa.5. He played for the South African sevens team, the Blitzbokke, for five years between 2012 and 2017. Like his cousin, Kolbe has an Olympic medal, winning a bronze at the 2016 Rio Olympics.Kolbe playing against Japan in the 2016 Rio Olympics (AFP/Getty Images)6. It was only when Rassie Erasmus changed the Springbok policy on picking overseas players that Kolbe was able to make his Test debut for the national team in 2018, having moved to Toulouse from the Stormers after finishing his sevens career. Toulouse and South Africa wing Cheslin Kolbe Watch: The incredible footwork of Cheslin Kolbe LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 7. South Africa’s thrilling 36-34 win over New Zealand in Wellington on 15 September 2018 was one of the best matches of modern times – and it also saw Kolbe score his first international try in 15s. Coming off the bench, he intercepted an Anton Lienert-Brown pass to score from halfway.8. Kolbe can also play fly-half and full-back, being utilised at stand-off multiple times in the 2020-21 season by Toulouse. Collapse MORE ON CHESLIN KOLBE Toulouse’s Springbok wing Cheslin Kolbe floored Bath with… Toulouse and South Africa wing Cheslin Kolbe 2019 Rugby World Cup Final: England 12-32 South Africa South Africa were crowned world champions for the… 2019 Rugby World Cup Final: England 12-32 South Africa Who is Cheslin Kolbe: Ten things you should know about the South Africa wingCheslin Kolbe is one of the best wingers in the modern game. His side-stepping ability is legendary and he scored a try in South Africa‘s 2019 Rugby World Cup final win over England.Widely known for his diminutive stature of only 5ft 7in, there are far more things you should know.Ten things you should know about Cheslin Kolbe 1. Kolbe was born on 28 October 1993 in Kraaifontein, a suburb of Cape Town. It was a violent area, with a large number of gang members. He once had to sprint away after becoming caught up in a firefight between rival groups.2. His father, Andrew, was also a rugby player, turning out for local club Hands and Heart as a dangerous inside-centre. However, this was during the midst of apartheid, so despite his talent, he couldn’t crack professional rugby.3. Kolbe’s cousin is Wayde van Niekerk, the current men’s 400m world-record holder who won Olympic gold in 2016. Kolbe was a national-standard hurdler as a young teenager but gave up on athletics to focus on rugby. The electric winger discusses soda, superpowers and sports… Watch: The incredible footwork of Cheslin Kolbe From famous relatives to a humble upbringing, here are some key facts about the World Cup winner Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Expandlast_img read more

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Dogs’ life

About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Dogs’ life AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Howard Lake | 17 February 1999 | News Bill Gates is not the only software mogul who makes charitable donations. Bill Gates is not the only software mogul who makes charitable donations. Dave Duffield, CEO of PeopleSoft, is giving $200 million of his own money to US animal shelters so that no healthy American stray cat or dog need be put down. Advertisement read more

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Wellington School Ayr named Fundraiser of the Year

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 Wellington School in Ayr, Scotland, has been named Fundraiser of the Year in the UK Heart Safe Awards 2015 after pupils raised £31,000 to buy a defibrillator.The fundraising followed the life-saving use of a defibrillator on one of the school’s pupils after she suffered a cardiac arrest. Lysanne McMahan & John McColgan from Wellington School expained:“We were devastated when one of our pupils Emily suffered a cardiac arrest. The ambulance that responded had a defibrillator and this saved her life. We set out to save others by raising as much money as we could – £31,000 in fact, in a school with only 580 pupils.”Wellington School is an independent day school in Ayr. It was founded in 1836 as a school for girls, and today the co-educational school provides both primary and secondary education.Staff and teachers at Wellington School Ayr are rewarded for their fundraisingThe national awards took place on 9 October 2015 at The Midland Hotel in Manchester. The event welcomed 300 attendees to recognise individual life-savers as well as organisations and employers who invest in creating heart safe environments across the UK.UK Heart Safe Awards were awarded across fifteen categories in total and other winners included the Royal National Lifeboat Institution and GE Healthcare The Maynard Centre with the special recognition award going to Phil Davies London Fire Brigade. Tagged with: Awards School Fundraising Scotland Wellington School Ayr named Fundraiser of the Year  170 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 Advertisement Howard Lake | 19 October 2015 | News  169 total views,  1 views today About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

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Concern about virulent criticism of Al-Jazeera and Al-Arabiya

first_imgNews Follow the news on Iraq December 28, 2020 Find out more RSF_en News Three jailed reporters charged with “undermining national security” IraqMiddle East – North Africa Help by sharing this information December 16, 2020 Find out more News Newscenter_img Reporters Without Borders today condemned the virulent criticism expressed by the US army and by Muwaffak al-Rubai, formerly a member of the Iraq’s US-appointed Governing Council, towards the two Arabic satellite TV news stations Al-Arabiya and Al-Jazeera, which they accused of inciting violence, lying and being “anti-coalition.”The organisation said the accusations “overstepped the limits” and “denied the right to editorial independence.”It also urged the governing council not to impose any new restriction on the ability of these two Arabic-language news media from working freely in Iraq. At the end of 2003, Al-Arabiya was banned from working and its bureaux in Baghdad were closed for two months. In January of this year, Al-Jazeera was banned from covering the activities of the governing council for a month.Reporters Without Borders said that, despite legitimate security concerns, it was “unacceptable” that the commander of the US forces and other senior US officials in Iraq describe certain news media as “anti-coalition.” Such remarks were dangerous just three weeks after two journalists with Al-Arabiya were killed by US gunfire while on the job, the organisation said. They could be interpreted by troops, who are having a trying time in the field, as meaning that some journalists are enemies and therefore legitimate targets.The threats of closure and expulsion expressed by Al-Rubai, newly appointed national security adviser for a five-year term, towards Al-Jazeera and Al-Arabiya do not help establish a climate of trust between journalists and the authorities. On the contrary, they are evidence of a restrictive view of press freedom.An Al-Jazeera spokesman said the network just reported the news professionally and also interviewed American officials “to be as balanced as possible”. It did not play politics and was neither with anyone nor against anyone, he said. Al-Arabiya editor-in-chief Salah Nejm said Iraq was a free country and his network used press freedom responsibly to cover “all sides of the story.”Gen. Mark Kimmitt, the deputy chief of military operations in Iraq, said during his daily press conference in Baghdad on 12 April that anti-American sentiment was being stirred up by Al-Jazeera and in the coverage of other media opposed to the coalition.Gen. John Abizaid, the commander of the US forces in Iraq, accused Al-Jazeera and Al-Arabiya of lying about the US army’s operations in Falluja. Also on 12 April, Al-Rubai threatened to close down Al-Jazeera’s and Al-Arabiya’s bureaux in Iraq if they “continue to incite violence and sedition.” “There is no doubt in my mind that if they continue reporting in the way they are reporting now… there is no question that they should be shut down is this country”, he said. February 15, 2021 Find out more to go further RSF’s 2020 Round-up: 50 journalists killed, two-thirds in countries “at peace” April 14, 2004 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Concern about virulent criticism of Al-Jazeera and Al-Arabiya Receive email alerts Organisation Iraq : Wave of arrests of journalists covering protests in Iraqi Kurdistan IraqMiddle East – North Africa last_img read more

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After three years, still no significant progress in Samir Kassir murder investigation

May 30, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 After three years, still no significant progress in Samir Kassir murder investigation Follow the news on Lebanon No suspect has been detained or charged in the three years since Franco-Lebanese journalist Samir Kassir’s murder on 2 June 2005 in Beirut. “We understand that justice must take its course and that the case is being affected by political developments in Lebanon, but it is nonetheless disturbing that Kassir’s murderers are still free,” Reporters Without Borders says. Organisation RSF_en to go further January 14, 2021 Find out more Receive email alerts LebanonMiddle East – North Africa LebanonMiddle East – North Africa Lebanese journalist found shot dead in car News Lebanon : Violence against reporters becoming more frequent in Lebanon News On the eve of the third anniversary of Franco-Lebanese journalist Samir Kassir’s murder on 2 June 2005 in Beirut, Reporters Without Borders and the Kassir family continue to be concerned about the slowness of both the French and Lebanese judicial authorities in this case, in which no suspect has been detained or charged.Kassir’s widow, Giselle Khoury, has shared her concern about the lack of progress with Reporters Without Borders. “Resolution seems to me to be very far away, too far,” she said. “The many political changes, not only in Lebanon but also throughout the region, are able to destabilise the investigation. That is why I count above all on the parallel judicial proceedings being conducted in France.”The day after Kassir’s murder, the Kassir family asked the French authorities to carry out their own investigation.Reporters Without Borders said: “We understand that justice must take its course and that the case is being affected by political developments in Lebanon, but it is nonetheless disturbing that Kassir’s murderers are still free three years later. Lebanese journalists will not be able to feel really safe in their country as long as this unacceptable impunity lasts.”Khoury’s lawyer, William Bourdon, said the French judge in charge of the case was doing “everything possible for his investigation to move ahead quickly.”The mandate of the United Nations commission of enquiry into former Lebanese Prime Minister Rafiq Hariri’s assassination has meanwhile been extended until 15 December. The commission is supposed to assist the investigations into the score of other political murders in Lebanon since 2004, including Kassir’s, and could facilitate the work of the Special Tribunal for Lebanon, created in 2007, when hearings start in the Hague.Daniel Bellemare, the head of the commission and the tribunal’s future prosecutor, said in his latest report that the Hariri assassination could have been carried out by a “criminal network” of individuals involved in other bombings in Lebanon. Various similarities have been noted, including in the modus operandi and the kind of victim.Kassir was killed when a bomb planted in his car exploded on the morning of 2 June 2005 outside his home in the neighbourhood of Achrafieh in East Beirut. A writer and historian, he was a columnist for the daily An-Nahar and a professor of political sciences at Beirut’s St. Joseph university. February 4, 2021 Find out more Help by sharing this information News Forum on Information and Democracy 250 recommendations on how to stop “infodemics” News November 11, 2020 Find out more read more

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Reform of Kisha Clubs demanded to end press freedom threat

first_img JapanAsia – Pacific News News Organisation to go further RSF_en Help by sharing this information Reporters Without Borders (Reporters Sans Frontières) today reiterated its call for the Japanese government to reform the country’s system of exclusive press clubs (kisha clubs), saying they were a “serious threat to the free flow of information”. The organisation was backing a similar request on 3 December by the European Union (EU) to allow foreign journalists the same access to information as the country’s major media outlets.A 17 October EU report on trade relations with Japan said the kisha club network was an obstacle to “the free flow of information” that allowed the authorities to suppress news unfavourable to them, that debased the news by preventing confirmation by a second source and also created a dangerous distinction between news given to the domestic and foreign press about events in Japan.The EU asked the government to allow all officially-accredited foreign journalists unrestricted access to press conferences in Japan and to reform the network of kisha clubs.  It warned that it would take the matter to the World Trade Organisation (WTO) if the government did not act.Reporters Without Borders called on Japanese prime minister Junichiro Koizumi last May to reform the clubs, but got no reply and its request was not reported in the Japanese media.  Since then, the privileges accorded to the major Japanese media have prevented many others – European, North American and also Japanese – from covering Koizumi’s recent official visit to North Korea on 17 September.The Foreign Correspondents’ Club of Japan has been trying for 50 years to get the kisha clubs to admit foreign journalists. Freelance journalists and smaller Japanese media have also called for an end to the system, which encourages self-censorship.Japan officially has about 800 kisha clubs, though the actual number is thought to be about 1,500.  Most are tied to government bodies (such as ministries and provincial governments), large firms, political parties and the Imperial Palace. Their members are more than 12,000 journalists from nearly 160 media affiliated to the Nihon Shimbun Kyokai (Japanese Newspaper Publishers and Editors Association). Japanese reporter held in Myanmar is charged with “false information” Follow the news on Japan Newscenter_img Receive email alerts JapanAsia – Pacific News December 10, 2002 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Reform of Kisha Clubs demanded to end press freedom threat May 5, 2021 Find out more November 19, 2020 Find out more On eve of the G20 Riyadh summit, RSF calls for public support to secure the release of jailed journalists in Saudi Arabia RSF urges recently appointed Japan Prime Minister to take a new turn towards press freedom September 16, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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Stretching the boundaries with new latex-free policy

first_imgStretching the boundaries with new latex-free policyOn 2 Jan 2003 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. With incidences of allergic reactions to latex gloves continuing to troublemany organisations, research by Nottingham Trent University has allowed theinstitution to develop a latex-free policy for all employees, by Nia Harris andJames Roper The use of latex gloves provides a challenge for many occupational healthprofessionals because of the incidence of latex allergies with continuous use.Many organisations have been forced to compromise between financial restraints,pressures from staff suffering latex-related problems and the unrivalledprotection offered by latex products. However, Nottingham Trent University has been able to develop a latex-freepolicy for use across the institution, following careful consideration of theoptions available. Literature search Before developing the policy, a literature search was carried out to gainsupport and guidance about the best approach to take. The available literaturedoes provide a solid basis to work from when compiling a policy. The majority of published articles on the subject concentrate on reductionof latex use within healthcare settings. Although the focus of the two leadingMedline and the Cinahl databases (see links) involves healthcare environments,evidence available on both these sources was useful in providing a basis forthe aims of the policy. The main concern was whether latex gloves should becompletely removed or their use limited by introducing strict regulations. Latex has, and continues to be used widely in healthcare environments forseveral reasons. Christopher Packham1 states that natural rubber latex offers ahigh level of biological protection that other types of glove cannot match, hasgood stretch qualities and is reasonably priced. This high level of protectionindicates that the total removal of latex from healthcare settings is notappropriate. Many institutions have attempted to create ‘latex-safeenvironments’ by reducing glove use to powder-free varieties and providingalternatives for sensitive staff. Research papers by Bowyer2 and Brehler3 assess the implications of latexhypersensitivity on the healthcare environment and give examples of reducinglatex use in healthcare. Almost all literature available on the subject ofmanaging hypersensitivity states how latex is uniquely invaluable inmaintaining adequate biological protection in order to meet requiredlegislation, such as the Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Regulations 19924.Gathering data The next stage of the process was an enquiry to determine what types of glovewere being used and for what purpose the university staff used them. This task could have proved difficult as the institution has 2,519employees. To gather as big a response as possible, a specific ‘glove usequestionnaire’ was designed, which consisted of closed questions, thusrestricting responses to just the information that was required. The questions put to the user requested the type of gloves used in theirparticular area to be specified, asked what tasks they were required for andthe frequency of use. The questionnaire also asked the respondent to state the company from whichthe gloves were purchased (as the use of more expensive gloves would have adifferent economic impact on each department involved) and whether studentswere required to put on the gloves to complete certain tasks. This question wasimportant as the university had a duty of care towards its students underhealth and safety legislation. Because students did not receive services fromoccupational health but used an onsite surgery when seeking health advice, thismeant very little information was available regarding students with possibleallergies. To minimise repetitive responses, the questionnaire was sent by e-mail tothe principal technician in each university department. This producedcomprehensive and concise overviews of glove use. In total, 13 out of 15questionnaires sent out were returned within the time specified. Although theother two were returned after the time date set, these were from departmentsthat did not use protective gloves. Developing the policy A large variety of gloves were shown to be in use at the university – almostall were made from latex. Only one department offered nitrile gloves as analternative. The tasks for which gloves were required were also extremely varied, rangingfrom using specific chemical-grade nitrile gloves for chemical handling to theuse of powdered latex gloves for handling pottery products. There were only twoinstances where the use of gloves to protect against biological products wasevident. These were in the provision of first aid facilities and were withinthe Occupational Health Department itself. The lack of biological risk throughout the organisation prompted the nextstage of developing the policy. The decision was made that all single-use latexprotective gloves should be replaced with a suitable alternative, thusminimising the risk of hypersensitivity among staff. Following the survey, a decision was made to include all types of protectiveglove into the policy – chemical strength gloves and textile gloves, forexample, with the aim of creating an equal level of health and safety acrossall departments. The classification of glove suppliers and their products wasalso to be specified to ensure the risks of incorrect glove choice wereminimised. The main area of concern for the development of safe glove use was inchemical laboratories and in art and design areas, as these were thedepartments that required the greatest levels of glove use. However, they requiredvery different approaches. Gloves are used in art and design departments to protect users from paintsand pottery dust. Some areas also use textile dyes on a regular basis. As noneof these activities expose users to biological risk, latex gloves were notrequired. The material used to replace latex in this area was nitrile becausethese gloves offer high levels of chemical impermeability5. The rationale for using different gloves in the chemical laboratories wasdue to many of the strong chemicals interacting with latex. The solution was toensure the effective use of chemical labelling as the safety precautions onmany simply states ‘use appropriate gloves when handling this product’. As aresult many staff were using the first gloves that came to hand, regardless oftheir suitability. This meant that, for every area using gloves on a regularbasis, a mass staff education programme was required. Education programme To plan how to educate the many staff working in areas of high glove use,advice was gathered from a variety of sources. Several glove companies were contacted for the most up-to-date productinformation. Visits from representatives were arranged, to enlighten staff fromthe departments that would be most affected by a policy change. These meetingswere extremely important as they began to shape the methods that would be usedto inform all staff and students of the potential dangers of incorrect gloveuse. Many glove manufacturers were able to supply guidelines detailing thetypes of glove suitable for handing different chemicals. Another invaluable source of advice came from other occupational healthdepartments who were contacted about reviews of glove use carried out at theirinstitutions. By using some of the advice from these sources, Nottingham TrentUniversity was able to draw up an education scheme that provided advice on themethods that would be most suited to the working environment of each givendepartment. Following consultations with staff from all departments, it became apparentthat formal teaching sessions on the subject of glove use and skin care wouldbe inappropriate, as most staff would only be present during term time, soformal training days would remove staff from the college when their help insupervising students was most needed. Therefore, as an initial point of contact, it was decided to set up a postercampaign to display information from glove manufacturers, relating only to thechemicals actually used in any specific location. In addition to the practicalinformation, the displays were strategically located around the campus. The displays focused on skin care and how to spot potential problemsassociated with prolonged glove use; and contact details for the occupationalhealth service were reinforced, along with information sources to use whenstaff found it necessary to carry out risk assessments on chemicals thatrequired glove use. To ensure staff adhered to the new requirements, trials took place usinggloves from a variety of sources to help determine which products were mostfavoured. Stock supplies of gloves were reduced, with stock maintained inproportion with the gloves’ required levels of use. And more posters weredisplayed in the storage areas to act as reminders to staff about the selectionof gloves. Following the implementation of the poster campaign, the types of glovepreferred by the staff were assessed. Staff and students in the art and design areas were found to be more contentwith powder-free, nitrile gloves. Because the laboratory staff used many typesof glove, comments on their comfort and ease of use were requested. The staff involved stated how, with the changes to the risk assessingprocess, glove choice had become much more simple and all gloves used werefound to be comfortable to wear, with no skin irritation problems beingreported to the occupational health department. Conclusion The implementation of a policy controlling the use of different types ofprotective gloves has been very successful. In the initial period prior toresearching and implementing the new policy, several types of glove and severaldifferent suppliers were being used. Once the policy had been implemented,along with the poster campaign, glove use had become much more controlled. The risk of hypersensitivity had been reduced by making available only thecorrect type of gloves for the particular use. The staff working in the areasof most prevalent glove use were more aware of the potential dangers ofincorrect usage, such as exposure to chemicals or the development ofglove-related skin problems. Overall, the development of the policy has created a more equal level ofsafety in each area of the university. References 1. Packham C (2000) Technical Bulletin No.6: Thoughts on Latex Allergy, EnvirodermServices – www.enviroderm.co.uk 2. Bowyer R (1999) The implications of latex allergy in healthcare settings.Journal of Clinical Nursing, 8(2) 139-143 3. Brehler R (2001) Natural Rubber Latex Allergy: A Problem ofInterdisciplinary Concern. Archives of Internal Medicine, 161(8) 1057-1064 4. Health and Safety Executive (1992) Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)Regulations 1992. London, HMSO 5. Korniewicz, Denise M (2002) Performance of latex and non latex medicalexamination gloves during simulated use. American Journal of Infection Control30 (2) 133-138 Acknowledgements: – Graham Ayers, sales representative, Bestglove Ltd – Eileen Black, occupational health specialist, Astrazeneca R+D Charnwood,Leics – Jane Braithwaite, senior technician, Life Sciences, Nottingham TrentUniversity James Roper is a student nurse at the University of Nottingham. NiaHarris BmedSci (Hons), DipOSH, is a RGN occupational health specialist, atNottingham Trent University [email protected]@ntu.ac.ukwww.medline.comwww.cinahl.comThelaw surrounding occupational health is incorporated in a number of generalduties under the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 etc, and in variousregulations made under this Act, such as the Control of Substances Hazardous toHealth (COSHH) Regulations 1999. The PPE Regulations (5) advise that everyemployer shall ensure that where the presence of more than one risk to healthor safety makes it necessary for an employee to use simultaneously more thanone item of personal protective equipment, such equipment is ‘compatible andcontinuous to be effective against the risk or risks in question’. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Modelling the dynamics of ice sheets

first_imgAlthough the mechanics and qualitative dynamics of grounded ice sheets and ice shelves are fairly well understood, this is not true for the transition between the two. In consequence, the existence and nature of any grounding line instability have yet to be established. Further problems are understanding how uncertainties in input parameters affect results, and obtaining optimal techniques for parameter inference using ice-sheet models.last_img

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Tokyo Olympics rescheduled for July 23-Aug. 8 in 2021

first_imgMarch 30, 2020 /Coronavirus (COVID-19) related news and sports stories, Sports News – Local Tokyo Olympics rescheduled for July 23-Aug. 8 in 2021 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailTOKYO (AP) — The Tokyo Olympics will open next year in the same time slot scheduled for this year’s games.Tokyo organizers say the opening ceremony will take place on July 23, 2021. That is almost exactly one year after the games were due to start this year.The IOC and Japanese organizers last week postponed the Olympics until 2021 because of the coronavirus pandemic.This year’s games were scheduled to open on July 24 and close on Aug. 9. But the near exact one-year delay will see the rescheduled closing ceremony on Aug. 8. Associated Press Written by Tags: Olympics/Tokyo Olympicslast_img read more

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USS Chafee Gets Ready for Talisman Sabre 2015

first_img View post tag: 2015 Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Chafee Gets Ready for Talisman Sabre 2015 View post tag: Asia-Pacific June 25, 2015 The Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Chafee (DDG 90) paid a visit to Brisbane, Australia, in preparation for exercise Talisman Sabre 2015, June 19-24.Chafee Sailors experienced the rich culture of the area with various tours of local historic locations and regional attractions provided by the ship’s morale, welfare and recreation (MWR) association.Chafee is on deployment with the George Washington Strike Group in the 7th Fleet area of responsibility supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region and will participate in the biennial military training exercise Talisman Sabre 2015 in Australia, July 4-19.[mappress mapid=”16328″]Image: US Navy Authorities View post tag: Navy USS Chafee Gets Ready for Talisman Sabre 2015 View post tag: Naval View post tag: USS Chafee View post tag: TALISMAN SABRE View post tag: News by topic Share this articlelast_img read more

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