Andrew Sheridan releases an album

first_imghttp://itunes.apple.com/gb/album/where-we-go-from-here/id396081452?i=396081578&ign-mpt=uo%3D4 LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Sale Sharks Media Manager Dave Swanton who also hosts a popular radio programme on the BBC said, “I was pleasantly surprised when I heard the tracks. I knew Sherry played the guitar but didn’t know how good he was. Hopefully it will pick up some airplay in the coming months.”center_img Andrew Sheridan – Singer?Andrew Sheridan, Sale Sharks powerhouse prop forward wants to know, “ Where We Go From Here.”Andrew who has been with Sale Sharks for seven years has recorded an album which is available from iTunes. Andrew who wrote all the 16 songs on the CD said, “ I recorded it at a studio in Manchester and when I played it to a few friends, they persuaded me to make it available on iTunes.”last_img read more

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Jerry Flannery set for more time on the sidelines

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Jerry Flannery’s cruel run of luck with injuries has continued with confirmation that the Munster and Ireland hooker is facing a lay-off of between four to six weeks.Jerry Flannery injured his right calf during the closing stages of Munster’s Magners League win over Ulster at Thomond Park last Saturday.He had been sprung from the replacements bench coming up to the hour mark, for his first appearance for Munster since their Heineken Cup victory over Toulon at the same venue in October.Against Toulon he suffered a recurrence of a troublesome injury to his left calf, and this latest injury is a real setback with important games in the Heineken Cup and the RBS 6 Nations Championship looming large on the horizon.Speaking after the Ulster game, head coach Tony McGahan said: “It’s a different calf (injury), not the same one. We’ll just have to wait and see.“Jerry is quite upset and everyone is feeling for him at this point in time. We will get a scan. “He worked really hard to get back from where he was and there is no doubt he will work really hard to get back from this one as well.“I haven’t gone through the details with him, he just knows it is injured and we will wait and see with the scan.”The scan, which was taken yesterday, has shown a tear in Flannery’s right calf muscle which will rule him out of action for four to six weeks.center_img That means he will miss Munster’s final pool games against Toulon and London Irish and Ireland’s RBS 6 Nations openers against Italy and France.Click here to see how much Jerry Flannery loves his hair!last_img read more

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Tom Palmer – Naked Truth

first_imgPalmerQuick-Fire Profile…Name: Tom PalmerPosition: LockAge: 31 (27 Mar 1979)Born: Haringey, LondonBig – that’s how I was as a five-year-old, so it was only a matter of time before someone took me along to rugby. My family had no involvement in the game and it was left to a family friend to take me and my brother, Elliott, to Barnet Minis in North London. I was five and we were both very boisterous boys, so it suited us. Straight away we played contact rugby. There was no tag in those days and we even had scrums, although lineouts were replaced with a tap.I played a lot of my junior rugby at centre or full-back. Once my family had moved to Edinburgh, I went straight to Boroughmuir RFC and Elliott, who is three years older than me, also carried on playing through school and university.Moving North I was put in a class at school with boys older than me (due to the Scottish schools system). That really helped my rugby because I was playing with and against older – and bigger – players.A swimming pool training session led to my move to lock. On a tour to Canada at 15, we were doing lineout practice in a pool and as I was pretty tall I was being thrown up in the air. Our coach, George Watson, saw this and as I was slowing down a little in terms of playing in the backs he said, ‘It’s time to move into the forwards’.My chances of representative rugby were hampered by not being at a private school, and the fact that I was a couple of years younger than those in my class. But I was 16 when the game turned professional and I remember thinking, ‘I want to be a pro rugby player’. I knew it was what I wanted to do.The experience I had going on a student exchange to Otago High School is one that I’d recommend to anyone. I was 16 and I went with another player Malcolm Clapperton, who went back to Durham and carried on playing for Boroughmuir and Scotland Sevens.Looking back I suppose that it was pretty daunting for a 16-year-old to head to the other side of the world, but I was determined to do all I could to further my rugby career and I knew going to New Zealand would definitely help.Invaluable is how I’d describe those two years to my rugby education – Richie McCaw and Samoa’s Filipo Levi were in the same school team in Otago! I was offered  a contract by Otago after playing for New Zealand Schools, but the offer came in only a few days before I was due to leave and it was too late for me to stay. My dad had already approached Leeds about me joining them. I came home and haven’t regretted it. I’ll always be grateful to Leeds as they allowed me to combine playing with studying (physics) at university, something I think more rugby players should do.Now I play for Stade Français, after leaving Leeds for Wasps and London for Paris. I’ll move into my third year next season. The differences  between playing for Stade and a club in the Aviva Premiership are small as our coach, Michael Cheika, has such as anglicised view of the game, but living in a different country is, of course, a great experience for me.Most people would have no idea I’ve been in the England squad longer than almost anyone else – this is the 11th season since my first call-up.Patient is what I’ve had to be since being called up by Clive Woodward in 2001. I always had belief and it has been quite frustrating at times, but now I’m getting my chance and a good run in the team. I believe I have to prove myself over and over again in every match to keep my place. Being on the outside for so long has taught me that and for me, nothing is ever good enough.I’m loving my time in the England squad, but John Wells keeps me grounded, pointing out a few things I’ve done wrong in a game. That’s the way it has to be.Did you know? Tom is part of an elite band of players who won their first England cap as a National One player, when at Leeds Tykes. He also spent part of his childhood in Kenya and represented Scotland at U19 and U21 level. Also, Tom’s England debut came as a replacement v USA way back in 2001.This article appeared in the April 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALScenter_img Or perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here. For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visitlast_img read more

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Blues make eleven changes for Edinburgh

first_imgLONDON, ENGLAND – FEBRUARY 06: Casey Laulala of Cardiff Blues is tackled by Gonzalo Camacho of Harlequins during the LV Anglo Welsh Cup match between Harlequins and Cardiff Blues at The Stoop on February 6, 2011 in London, England. (Photo by Julian Finney/Getty Images) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Returning: Casey LaulalaWith the international players returning, the Blues have made eleven changes ahead of Friday night’s match.The Blues make six changes in the backs, with only Casey Laulala remaining in the starting XV from the team that lost to Leinster last Friday. There are a further five changes in forwards with only Xavier Rush, Paul Tito and Fau Filise keeping their places in the pack.Cardiff Blues are looking to make it six of the best against Edinburgh Rugby – but forwards coach Justin Burnell insists that five match winning run against the Scottish capital side will count for nothing when the teams clash at Cardiff City Stadium on Friday night.Three wins on the trot in the Pro12, along with an 18-17 home win and a 21-14 victory on the road in last season’s Heineken Cup leave the Blues looking for a sixth straight success.“We do have a good record against Edinburgh but it counts for nothing at all now,” said Burnell. “It is all about current form and they are a fantastic side.” “They were shown up by Munster but even then they were scoring tries. They are very capable in attack and can score tries. We are well aware that Edinburgh are a very good side. Michael Bradley has come in and given them a total overhaul, having done a fantastic job at Connacht.”“They have formidable players like Tim Visser, Chris Paterson and Ross Ford and some of them are the form players in Europe.”Starting XV:15 Leigh Halfpenny14 Alex Cuthbert13 Casey Laulala12 Jamie Roberts11 Chris Czekaj10 Dan Parks9 Lloyd Williams8 Xavier Rush7 Sam Warburton6 Michael Paterson5 Paul Tito (c)4 Bradley Davies3 Taufa’ao Filise2 T Rhys Thomas1 Gethin Jenkins Replacements:16 Ryan Tyrell17 John Yapp18 Scott Andrews19 Maama Molitika20 Josh Navidi21 Richie Rees22 Ceri Sweeney23 Gavin EvansNot available due to injuryAndries Pretorius – kneeDeiniol Jones – shoulderMartyn Williams – armGavin Henson – wristKristian Dacey – shoulderlast_img read more

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Fast Eddie needs time to make class tell

first_imgAccording to Jones, England will have a team ready for real international rugby by the end of the Six Nations, which is slightly inconvenient as he has to give them back to their clubs so they can kick the proverbial out of each other. But to get a crop of world-class players will take a little bit longer – even for Jones.For the latest Rugby World magazine subscription offers, click here. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS We haven’t quite worked out if Eddie Jones is putting something in the tea down at Pennyhill Park but whatever he is doing seems to be working as a succession of players tell us how hard they are working, how fit they feel and how everything is sweetness and light after the Rugby World Cup flop.In the last week alone, the Aussie has cottoned onto the fact that England might not be the flavour of the month with the other Six Nations countries, has told us that the match day 23 squad are 30 per cent fitter than they were a month ago, that Elliot Daly is finally ready for Test rugby but England still don’t have any world class players.On call: Elliot Daly will look to reproduce his Wasps form off the England bench. (Photo: Getty Images)The first one is an episode in stating the bleeding obvious but the next two are pretty quick turnarounds. Talk about water into wine and all at express pace thanks to Fast Eddie. For his next trick he will be knocking up lunch using a couple of loaves of bread and few fish but even Jones can’t do anything about injuries. On Wednesday morning Joe Launchbury was fine, by Wednesday tea-time he was out – but he is ticking most of the boxes.The 30 per cent fitness thing I don’t get.  Every rugby player I know spends buckets of time on fitness, chucking tin in the gym and probably not enough time on skills. In 1995 when the game went professional we were told that not having to do a day job would give players more time to recover and work at things like passing, kicking, throwing in at the lineout and all that jazz.Pedal power: Are England really 30 per cent fitter already? (Photo: Getty Images)None of those core skills have improved over the last 21 years but blimey can these boys throw some dumb bells around in the gym. So how Jones has got them 30 per cent fitter in less than a few weeks, if he has, is probably down to training smarter which is not the greatest advert for the Aviva Premiership. Big future: Jones chats to Maro Itoje (left) who gets his first Test start this weekend. (Photo: Getty Images) TAGS: Highlight Eddie Jones has pulled off most of his tricks since pitching up with England but there is one he cannot fast forward. You never know, it could all be bravado, Jones is playing us like a Steve McQueen card-sharp, and he is doing it all to give the players a boost. Daly was not a Test player two weeks ago but he is now, although if he gets on against Ireland on Saturday it will probably be at inside centre. Jones, though, has stopped short of telling us he has any world class players in the squad. That takes time and even Jones can’t conjure up a few top-notchers in a month. There are a few who could get there – Maro Itoje, Daly, Manu Tuilagi, George Ford, Billy Vunipola and Owen Farrell have all been mentioned but no one is there yet.There have been enough good players coming through the Under-20s in recent years that you would like to think one or two of them will turn out to be world-beaters, but not for the minute. Mike Brown broke ranks at the end of the World Cup saying hardly any England players would get in a British & Irish Lions team let alone a World XV and even a month of Jones has not swayed the full-back.Chasing places: Which England players will make it into the Lions tour? (Photo: Getty Images)“I said it at the end of the World Cup and there is no change,” Brown told us on Wednesday. “We have only been together four weeks so my view hasn’t changed on that. Eddie is the boss and he said it, that’s what counts. I said it too but it doesn’t matter what I say.”last_img read more

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How to make it as a radio broadcaster: Ian Robertson

first_img At the workplace: Robertson prepares to commentate on England v Wales in the Six Nations LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS You have also penned a number of books including a biography of actor Richard Burton?“That was because of Richard Burton’s brother, Graham Jenkins worked in BBC Radio Sport and after Richard died the family wanted to put out a biography of him and I helped pen the first draft.One of the greats: Roberts penned the autobiography of the iconic Gareth Edwards“However, we realised it wasn’t full of all the great actors that had worked with Richard because neither myself nor the publisher knew them. So we brought in a specialist guy who was in the theatre world who put it together while keeping some of the biographical detail that I had done about his upbringing in Pontrhydyfen. He rewrote the bulk of the book but still gave me a great credit.“I have also done four books with Gareth Edwards and I co-authored Andy Irvine’s autobiography and Bill Beaumont’s. I used up quite a lot of paper in those days.”Radio remains your fondest medium?“I love radio, it is instant and it is just a great part of the media. I am very, very lucky and very, very privileged to have had such a run. Every Lions tour since 1983, every World Cup as a commentator and every England tour abroad. It has been a wonderful, wonderful life.“Rugby people by and large are great people, very easy to work with, there are some pretty bright guys playing rugby, and interviews the vast majority will make an effort to give a very good interview.”Has the role of commentator changed during your career?“I don’t think the art of commentary has changed much. It is easier now as there is far more assistance, for example the TMO, when you are not sure why a penalty has been given, which happens from time to time, and you can hear the referee, we’re wired up now, we weren’t of course 40 years ago, and we can hear every word from the referee, what he is saying to the players and what is going on, why he is awarding this or that, going to the TMO and hearing him describe what he thinks has happened and why he thinks it is or isn’t a try.Iconic moment: Robertson commentated on the 2003 World Cup win“But the actual art of doing the commentary is more or less what it has always been, trying to get over the emotion, the passion, the excitement, everything that is going on in a game of rugby and making sure that you can translate that for the listener and get them every bit as excited as you as a commentator are.”You most have many memories but England’s World Cup Final triumph in 2003 must stand out and your famous ‘He drops for World Cup glory’ line?“The art of commentary is the last of the great ad-lib shows on radio and TV, it’s live and it’s the ability of the commentator to capture every bit of the emotion and accurately describe what is happening. “My position was way up in the back of the stand which would have been about 50 yards from the near touchline and this was going on in the middle of the pitch slightly on the far side. So they would be the best part of 90 yards away from where I was and when he struck the ball with his right foot having said Jonny is going to drop for World Cup glory, I suddenly grabbed my binoculars and stuck them up to my head and kept talking as it was his right foot and we knew he had never kicked a drop goal with his right foot in a big match.“The words just came tumbling out and I wasn’t even aware of it at the time. Then there was the restart and mike Catt kicked the ball away and the final whistle went – and I didn’t think too much about it, I just remember thinking thank goodness that was Jonny’s drop goal and not Mike Catt…It wasn’t until we listened back that night that and realised that we nailed that – and it’s been played a few times since.”Unforgettable moment: Robertson says to convey the emotion on the pitchIan Robertson’s top tips for a career in radio broadcasting:+ Do your homework!“Follow Bill McLaren’s example and be prepared. If a player is injured then be able to talk about them non-stop for 2-3 minutes.” + Say what you see“You don’t state the blindingly obvious on TV but with radio the listener could be driving up the M1 and they do not have a picture in front of them…so paint a picture for that person.”+ Embrace the pressure“The pressure is always there but you live with it and enjoy it. You have got to have the adrenalin flowing through you if you are going to capture the essence of the match whether it is a big game or a club game.”+ Swallow a dictionary“Make sure you practice. Go to a match and commentate, sit there and describe it and always have something to say. Just describe what is happening in front of you at full volume with every word in the dictionary at your disposal.” By Graham JenkinsThe Forward Pass Podcast – Ian RobertsonWelcome to The Forward Pass, a series of conversations with leading rugby union journalists, broadcasters, presenters and photographers who will offer the next generation of media professionals – and fans – an insight into how they cover the sport.The latest industry veteran to join host Graham Jenkins to reflect on a colourful career both playing and reporting on the sport is BBC Rugby correspondent Ian Robertson.Read extracts from the podcast and listen to the complete conversation below.Injury brought a premature end to your international career at the age of 25 – did you feel robbed of many more Test caps? “I did the cruciate ligament in one knee and the medial ligaments in the other and if I had been a horse they would have shot me so that was the end of it…“It’s just life isn’t it? Loads of rugby players get injured and it is part and parcel of the game, I wasn’t huge, I was 12st and 5ft 8in and there were some lumps going around in our team like Peter Stag who was 6ft 10in and 18st, so there were big lumps of meat charging around rugby pitches even back then.”You went back to teaching but a career in the media beckoned?“Yes, the world works in wonderful and mysterious ways. I was teaching at Fettes College in Edinburgh and because I got injured I missed all of the Five Nations in 1971 and in fact never recovered properly to play at a top level again. The following year a great man that everyone will know, called Cliff Morgan, came up to Edinburgh to visit me and I met him in Princes Street at the Balmoral Hotel and he said that he was switching from radio to do TV where he would share the rugby with Bill McLaren. Cliff was very versatile and a brilliant broadcaster, and he said that there’s a gap for someone in radio – ‘are you interested?’Influence: Robertson was given an opportunity by the great Cliff Morgan (far right)“I said ‘I am!’ and we had a long chat about it, and he said I would have to come down for a formal interview and before I got there on that day he had had a long chat with me and told me what they were looking for, this is what it is all about, I know you will be capable of doing it and I know you will do it really, really well so I went down and had my interview and got the job – and that was the start of it all back at the beginning of April, 1972.”Were you looking for a move into the media?“No, funnily enough I was very happy teaching. I taught English and History at Fettes, loved the job and it was sheer chance that my injury came in 1971 and this was a year later. It never crossed my mind, but when he turned up and described the job I just thought I would love to do that and I’ve loved every minute since.“I’ve seen an awful lot of great moments, some disappointing moments but it was a wonderful opportunity to follow the game I love.”Do you remember the first game you called?“It was a strange game, Rosslyn Park v Coventry, and it was not a great position to be commentating from but I did. I learnt all the names and had a great, great friend who was the greatest rugby commentator of all time who was Bill McLaren and I spent a lot of time with him. I went up to Scotland for several days and discussed everything with him and he told me how he went about it, which was a pretty good blueprint for any potential commentator whatever the sport. The voice of rugby: The incomparable Bill Mclaren and now World Rugby president Bill Beaumont“For each game he had a set of notes that had roughly 1,200 statistics on them. Every player in the match got four lines and there would be seven or eight statistics on every line and they would be in four different colours, blue, red, black and green and if a player was injured he would know immediately what colour to go to and which fact he was looking at.“He would do it for Scotland v England – he’d do it for Jed-Forest v Gala. He did it for every match and would phone the secretaries and get the details of all the players, the number of injuries they had had, facts and figures and he said if a player is injured and it looks bad I will be able to talk about him for three minutes without any problem at all as I will have it all in front of me although, he said, I tend to learn it all off by heart every week and don’t often need to look at my notes!“With that sort of help at the very beginning I knew at least what I should be doing and how important it was to have a huge bucket full of facts and figures for every match.”You were certainly blessed to be able to learn first-hand from two greats like Cliff and Bill?“Yes. It wasn’t a bad couple of people to befriend on the outset of the tour of the world of rugby. Both were such brilliant, brilliant people and such great fun, I was doubly blessed, there’s no question about that. “Bill and I stayed friends throughout our…he was just a brilliant commentator and he would put in these countless hours of work to make sure he wouldn’t be in trouble if anything happened he would be able to keep talking about it and of course he had a wonderful turn of phrase…TV and radio are two different art forms and Bill was the consummate master of both.”You also had a spell writing for the Sunday Times?“I got an offer from the sports editor of the Sunday Times in 1980, John Lovesey. The long-term correspondent there was Vivian Jenkins who was one of the all-time great journalists and he’d retired and his successor John Hopkins was switching to golf. I talked about it with one or two of my colleagues at the BBC and they said that it would be a great thing to do even if you only did it for five years and then came back to broadcasting.“I was the luckiest lad on earth because I talked about it to the head of sport at the BBC and he said they would still like me to work for them…which meant I was able to keep broadcasting.”center_img Tips from making it as a radio broadcaster from former Scotland scrum-half and now legendary BBC Radio commentator, Ian Robertson + Sell the game“Try to convey the emotion, the passion, the excitement, everything that is going on in a game of rugby and make sure that you can translate that for the listener and get them every bit as excited as you as a commentator are.”last_img read more

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Fiji Wow the World in Dominant Hamilton Sevens Win

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Fiji brought their usual flair and incredible skill to the New Zealand Sevens tournament recently. WORLD CLASS OFFLOADINGLet’s just take a minute to appreciate just how good this try was from @fijirugby pic.twitter.com/Wu9USmpSDL— World Rugby Sevens (@WorldRugby7s) January 27, 2019 The All Blacks Sevens team has always given… With 2 years to go before the Tokyo… Ali Stokes argues that Saracens No 8 Billy… Opinion: Eddie Jones Must Rethink Billy Vunipola’s England Role Could The All Blacks Pathway From Sevens To Test Rugby Soon Be Closed? 2020 Tokyo Olympics Rugby Sevens Schedule Finalised Could The All Blacks Pathway From Sevens To Test Rugby Soon Be Closed? HIGHLIGHTS: Fiji dominate in Hamilton to go joint top of world series #DHLRugby pic.twitter.com/NtT5PcR0I2— World Rugby Sevens (@WorldRugby7s) January 27, 2019Thanks to their victory the Fijians are now in tied first place with the USA at the top of the World Series standings. New Zealand and South Africa follow in third and fourth place. Something truly unique to rugby sevens. @HSBC_Sport ball carrier gets lifted high by Fiji! pic.twitter.com/PCXumvthxk— World Rugby Sevens (@WorldRugby7s) January 27, 2019Fiji had dominated the tournament to get to the final, after beating Wales, Argentina and Australia on the first day before totally outplaying Canada and South Africa in the knockout rounds.The USA were playing in their third Sevens World Series Final in a row thanks to victories over Tonga, Samoa, England, Scotland and then New Zealand. However, the Fijians were on top form and the Americans never stood a chance. The unbelievable off-loading to set up the try below is the only evidence necessary to prove this point, because even by Fijian standards, it was ridiculous. Expand Expand Fiji Wow the World in Dominant Hamilton Sevens WinIn more ways than one, the Fijian Sevens rugby team dazzled and entertained all onlookers during the New Zealand Sevens tournament that took place last weekend.Facing the United States in the final, before the match had even started the islanders had won over many in the crowd after lifting the official ball-carrier into the air during their prayer. It was a lovely moment as you can see below. The Hamilton crowd was treated to a dominant display which saw the men in white win the match 38-0.Jerry Tuwai was announced as the HSBC Player of the Final thanks to his two tries and general excellence. The second of which he is scoring below in front of a colossal number of Fijian fans. You could be forgiven for thinking the tournament was being held in Suva, looking at the sheer amount of support on show! 2020 Tokyo Olympics Rugby Sevens Schedule Finalised Collapse In front of a sea of Fiji fans, Jerry Tuwai runs it in. pic.twitter.com/pYijxLAlTG— World Rugby Sevens (@WorldRugby7s) January 27, 2019To see some of the best highlights from the knockout stages of the tournament we have included the video from the official Twitter account of World Rugby Sevens. Opinion: Eddie Jones Must Rethink Billy Vunipola’s England Role The next stop for the global series is Sydney, where the tournament will take place from the 1st to the 3rd of February.Don’t forget to follow Rugby World on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram for the latest news from the world of rugby.last_img read more

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Michael Cheika: “I don’t know the rules anymore”

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS With the #RWC2019 warm-up matches well underway, here is all you need to know about the high tackle sanction framework & why it is important to protecting the long-term health of players (video included) https://t.co/4CdvBGKYdW pic.twitter.com/YwOjdUl4gH— dominic rumbles (@dominicrumbles) August 23, 2019Amidst all the debate and controversy, it’s important to remember that this has been brought in for player welfare reasons and primarily to reduce the risk of concussions.We asked Wales wing George North if he was concerned about the increased focus on high tackles and he said: “I’m not worried. We’ve all been briefed and we all know the rules. It can be frustrating sometimes but we all buy into it.”After all, the aim is to improve player safety. The Samu Kerevi-Rhys Patchell incident is the latest tackle controversy to mar the Rugby World Cup Michael Cheika: “I don’t know the rules anymore”There may not have been any cards or calls for citings during Wales’ World Cup win over Australia, but there was still plenty of controversy.It all centred around a collision between Samu Kerevi and Rhys Patchell. Wales’ replacement fly-half was very upright going into the tackle – poor technique it has to be said – and was knocked backwards by the force of the Wallaby centre’s run.Some could make a case for Patchell’s tackle being reviewed for being high, but the TMO raised the dangerous element of Kerevi leading with his forearm, which rose up to connect with Patchell’s throat. Reckless was the verdict and a penalty for Wales.Match report: Australia 25-29 WalesThe exchange between referee Romain Poite and Australia captain Michael Hooper, as well as Kerevi, was interesting. Hooper flagged Patchell’s poor technique and asked how Kerevi was supposed to carry with the ball. Tucking in his arm seemed to be the advice, but the Wallabies were clearly still frustrated by the decision post-match.Hooper said: “I don’t know how to carry into a player, as a player who is trying to make a dominant carry. And he (Patchell) used poor tackle technique and has fallen back. I don’t know what Kerevi could have done.”Kerevi himself was just as flummoxed: “The way rugby is going, I might as well join the NRL next seeing as how they police it. Look, it’s a hard decision for the referees. I guess I’ve got to change the technique, the way I run.“I’ve been playing like that my whole career and that’s the first time I’ve heard that I can’t lead with my arms and bump.“It’s hard when you slow it down to one-tenth of a second. It looks like I’m going for his neck, but there’s no malice in it.“What do we do in that split-second? With the force I’m coming at, and if he’s going backwards and I can’t move forward, I might as well just stop. I guess I’ve got to use more feet and not run straight anymore.”Related: World Rugby criticises World Cup refereesAustralia coach Michael Cheika went as far as to say he was “embarrassed” by the decision and that he no longer understood the game’s laws. Australia wing Reece Hodge was banned for three matches earlier this week for his tackle on Fiji’s Peceli Yato and Cheika believes Patchell’s tackle on Kerevi was similar.“It was pretty funny because I thought I had seen that tackle before, it could have been Reece Hodge, I am not sure,” said Cheika, with more than a hint of sarcasm. “When our guy makes that tackle and has the high tackle framework in his head, he gets suspended. This guy doesn’t think about the high tackle framework and we get penalised.“As a rugby player, a former player, I am embarrassed here. I honestly don’t know the rules anymore.” Hodge banned for three weeks after tackle on Fiji’s YatoDo you agree with the decision? https://t.co/cAHRQB0k3R pic.twitter.com/eUJOrb3eoe— ITV Rugby (@ITVRugby) September 25, 2019Cheika believes rugby has gone too far in the current regulations and that officials are scared of making the wrong decision. He added: “You’ve got to look after players, but not to the extreme where you are looking after the players just for the doctors and lawyers. You’ve got to look after the players for the players.“They all seem spooked. Everybody seems worried. I am not sure why they are worried, the players aren’t worried. Then it’s affecting everything else on the field, with decisions on all types of crazy stuff.“Maybe the administrators are spooking the referees. The referees are worried about making wrong decisions and become ultra-cautious.”The high tackle rulings look set to continue to dominate conversations around this World Cup. There have now been two red cards for dangerous tackles and three three-week bans from citings. Even Piers Francis escaping a ban because his tackle on Will Hooley was deemed a yellow card offence has caused debate.If you’re unsure of the High Tackle Sanction Framework – as it is snappily known – this flowchart should help explain the process referees and officials are supposed to go through for high tackles… Flashpoint: Samu Kerevi was penalised for leading with the arm on Rhys Patchell (Getty Images) Keep updated on what’s happening in Japan at our Rugby World Cup homepage.Follow Rugby World magazine on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter.last_img read more

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Hotshot: Gloucester wing Louis Rees-Zammit

first_img Corner stop: Louis Rees-Zammit scores for Gloucester against Montpellier (Getty Images) TAGS: Gloucester When I was 16. I moved from Cardiff Blues to Hartpury College and got picked up by Gloucester within a few weeks. I haven’t thought about anything else ever since.Who has been your biggest influence? My family. They took me everywhere and watched me; they’re very supportive.Any representative honours? I’ve played for Wales U18 twice. Going to South Africa at 17 was a very good experience.Have you already exceeded your goals for this season? I wanted to play one or two Premiership games – I hadn’t even thought about playing in the Champions Cup – but that’s come and hopefully I’ve taken the opportunity. I’m taking it game by game, training session by training session.The best advice you’ve received? It’s not advice but I took it as a way of going forward. When I was 12 or 13, I was basically told that I wasn’t good enough and since then I’ve wanted to prove people wrong. It’s motivated me.RW VERDICT: One of the stars of the season, with 12 tries in 14 Gloucester games, he won the Premiership Player of the Month in December and was then named in Wales’ Six Nations squad. A first cap surely beckons this year. Gloucester wing Louis Rees-ZammitDate of birth 2 February 2001 Born Cardiff Position Wing Club Gloucester Country WalesWhen did you first play? Aged seven. I started with Llandaff and was there until I was 12, then I joined Rhymney until I was 16. I played for Cathedral School too.What positions have you played? When I was younger, scrum-half, then I moved along the back-line – ten, outside-centre and wing when I went to Hartpury. That was probably down to my speed. They put me there and I haven’t looked back.Have you always been fast? I’m getting faster with coaching at Gloucester. I’ve run 10.2m per second this season.What are your strengths? Probably making decisions on offloading ball or trying to run around opponents.Who was your childhood rugby hero? Shane Williams. I went to so many Wales games when I was younger and he was the standout player. I felt like I wanted to play like him, even though I’m a completely different build to him!When did you join Gloucester? The speedster’s Premiership form earned him a call-up into Wales’ Six Nations squad This article originally appeared in the March 2020 issue of Rugby World magazine.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALSlast_img read more

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Who is Cheslin Kolbe: Ten things you should know about the South Africa wing

first_img Cheslin Kolbe celebrates after scoring in the 2019 Rugby World Cup final (Getty Images) Cheslin Kolbe, arguably the best player in the world right now, cleaning up rubbish around the pitch at Thomond Park after full-time…This is what it’s all about #HeinekenChampionsCup pic.twitter.com/LviV26kFiW— Rugby on BT Sport (@btsportrugby) April 3, 20219. Kolbe is a philanthropist and works with the Be The Difference Foundation in 2014. The organisation tries to tackle poverty in the Western Cape and fed 400 people a week at the start of the Covid-19 pandemic lockdown in South Africa.10. While careful with his money, Kolbe told Rugby World that his main vice was collecting watches – he owns 12 in all! Expand 4. His rugby hero when growing up was South African centre Adrian Jacobs, who was also from Kraaifontein. Jacobs started the first two Tests at outside-centre during the 2009 Lions tour of South Africa.5. He played for the South African sevens team, the Blitzbokke, for five years between 2012 and 2017. Like his cousin, Kolbe has an Olympic medal, winning a bronze at the 2016 Rio Olympics.Kolbe playing against Japan in the 2016 Rio Olympics (AFP/Getty Images)6. It was only when Rassie Erasmus changed the Springbok policy on picking overseas players that Kolbe was able to make his Test debut for the national team in 2018, having moved to Toulouse from the Stormers after finishing his sevens career. Toulouse and South Africa wing Cheslin Kolbe Watch: The incredible footwork of Cheslin Kolbe LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS 7. South Africa’s thrilling 36-34 win over New Zealand in Wellington on 15 September 2018 was one of the best matches of modern times – and it also saw Kolbe score his first international try in 15s. Coming off the bench, he intercepted an Anton Lienert-Brown pass to score from halfway.8. Kolbe can also play fly-half and full-back, being utilised at stand-off multiple times in the 2020-21 season by Toulouse. Collapse MORE ON CHESLIN KOLBE Toulouse’s Springbok wing Cheslin Kolbe floored Bath with… Toulouse and South Africa wing Cheslin Kolbe 2019 Rugby World Cup Final: England 12-32 South Africa South Africa were crowned world champions for the… 2019 Rugby World Cup Final: England 12-32 South Africa Who is Cheslin Kolbe: Ten things you should know about the South Africa wingCheslin Kolbe is one of the best wingers in the modern game. His side-stepping ability is legendary and he scored a try in South Africa‘s 2019 Rugby World Cup final win over England.Widely known for his diminutive stature of only 5ft 7in, there are far more things you should know.Ten things you should know about Cheslin Kolbe 1. Kolbe was born on 28 October 1993 in Kraaifontein, a suburb of Cape Town. It was a violent area, with a large number of gang members. He once had to sprint away after becoming caught up in a firefight between rival groups.2. His father, Andrew, was also a rugby player, turning out for local club Hands and Heart as a dangerous inside-centre. However, this was during the midst of apartheid, so despite his talent, he couldn’t crack professional rugby.3. Kolbe’s cousin is Wayde van Niekerk, the current men’s 400m world-record holder who won Olympic gold in 2016. Kolbe was a national-standard hurdler as a young teenager but gave up on athletics to focus on rugby. The electric winger discusses soda, superpowers and sports… Watch: The incredible footwork of Cheslin Kolbe From famous relatives to a humble upbringing, here are some key facts about the World Cup winner Can’t get to the shops? You can download the digital edition of Rugby World straight to your tablet or subscribe to the print edition to get the magazine delivered to your door.Follow Rugby World on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter. Expandlast_img read more

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