International Court Gives Nicaragua More Waters, Outlying Keys to Colombia

first_img The International Court of Justice (ICJ) expanded Nicaraguan maritime sovereignty over the Caribbean, but kept part of San Andrés island’s western border as Colombia wanted, and gave the South American country all disputed keys in an area rich in oil and other resources. The ICJ determined an irrevocable ruling over a large part of the maritime border between Colombia and Nicaragua. Both countries had previously committed to unconditionally accepting the ruling, after several decades of bilateral disputes. Colombia, the first of both countries to react, rejected the new maritime delimitation. “When demarcating the maritime borders, the Court committed serious mistakes that I must highlight, and which affect us negatively … these are all omissions, errors, excesses, inconsistencies that we cannot tolerate,” President Juan Manuel Santos said to the country after the ruling. On the other hand, Santos was pleased with the ratification of the Colombian sovereignty over islands and keys, and he did not specify how he would oppose the maritime demarcation stipulated in the ICJ ruling, which is considered irrevocable. “We shall not discard any resources conceded by the international law,” said the head of state. His Nicaraguan counterpart, Daniel Ortega, considered the ICJ ruling as a “national victory” that had restored maritime spaces taken by Colombia in the Caribbean, and urged the South American nation to respect the high court’s decision. The ruling that came from the 15 judges of the ICJ – the main judicial body of the United Nations, which have universal jurisdiction – was submitted in The Hague in a two-hour presentation by the court’s main representative, Peter Tomka. “The Court concludes that Colombia, not Nicaragua, had sovereignty” over the islets in dispute, indicated Tomka. He was referring to the Albuquerque, Bajo Nuevo, Este-Sudeste, Quitasueño, Roncador, Serrana and Serranilla keys. The other aspect of the dispute was the demarcation of the maritime border, in which the Nicaraguan jurisdiction was extended from the east of the 82nd meridian to Colombia’s current jurisdiction. In this way, the ruling favored Managua so as to compensate what was considered an “important disparity” benefitting Bogotá. Tomka spoke in detail about the coordinates of the new border, which extends the Nicaraguan sovereignty towards the east, but maintains a portion of the Colombian jurisdiction up to San Andrés and Providencia islands, as well as in a ratio of only 12 nautical miles around the Colombian keys of Serrana and Quitasueño, rich in fish, lobsters and conch. The Court did not specify the total maritime extension attributed to each country, since there are two sections that remain without demarcation toward the east: the judges did not want to extend their ruling beyond 200 miles off shore. By Dialogo November 21, 2012 Please send me or post the full ICJ ruling.last_img read more

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Jasenka Kranjčević, IZTZG: How will the COVID-19 pandemic affect health security in the tourism sector

first_imgIt is known that the health security of tourism significantly depends on compliance with health regulations, health opportunities, but also the organization of the national, regional and local public health system. Precisely this last fact showed that where there is a well-organized public health system on humane principles, the pandemic was kept under control as much as possible and did not significantly affect the overall health system. If no vaccine is found in the foreseeable future, in all areas where tourism takes place, it is necessary to ensure stricter social distance and hygiene (restaurants, beaches, public swimming pools, sports buildings, cultural buildings, souvenir shops, shops, etc.). In that case, it will be necessary to change / supplement the regulations, recommendations, plans and studies on possible reception capacities which regulate the maximum number of tourists, e.g. for beaches, hotels, swimming pools, etc.  Attachment: dr.sc. Jasenka Kranjčević: Tourism and Health Security “Tourism and health security“Is the title of a new professional paper from the Institute of Tourism, this time by dr.sc. Jasenka Kranjčević in which she commented on how the COVID-19 pandemic will affect health security in the tourism sector.  It is known that tourism has an interdisciplinary dimension, and depending on its spatial coverage and intensity, so far it has been more or less monitored through its impact and connection with the economy, law, transport, environment, spatial planning, architecture, etc. work dr.sc. Jasenka Kranjčević. and adds that now that tourism has been hit by a pandemic, its perhaps neglected dimension is visible, and that is the health security of tourism, but in a different way. Also, Kranjčević emphasizes that given the mobility of tourists and the desire to change the destination, the question of the right to move and monitor movement arises. In the tourist promotion of Croatia, she should, among other things, emphasize and emphasize the tradition and results of the public health system, concludes Kranjčević. It is known that trust between tourist supply and demand takes a long time to build, and can be easily lost due to emergencies, which is perhaps the biggest problem. The pandemic has shown that health security in tourism (tourists, tourism stakeholders and the domicile population) may not have been highlighted enough, but has now proved very important and should be taken into account when planning and monitoring the sustainable development of tourism. Therefore, it may be time to establish new relationships at the global level, among other things, to monitor the sustainable development of tourism. center_img Perhaps medical, health, dental tourism and other types and forms of tourism will gain new meaning and be more strongly connected with health security and the health system, Kranjčević points out and emphasizes that a strong national and regional health system, as well as the ability to fast and quality response, certainly have a strong connection with tourism in the context of a sense of security of a destination. Tourism will be increasingly linked to health security2 and monitoring the public health system where tourism takes place. This means that in the new relations, the issue of health security will become an important segment in the preparation of travel, choosing a destination, but also the provision of services in tourism, believes Kranjčević. In the end, he points out that it is assumed that the feeling of health security in tourism will become one of the important impressions and challenges for the destination, but also for witnesses in tourism as well as the local population. Therefore, the perception of quality health security and services may be increasingly important for tourism, and it will be necessary to expand research in this regard as well. Therefore, perhaps now is the time to reconsider the existing principles and settings of sustainable tourism development, its interdisciplinarity, and thus the health security of tourism at all levels. The entire professional work of dr.sc. Jasenka Kranjčević read in the attachment: Regardless of how the recovery of the tourism industry after the pandemic is designed, there is no doubt that health security in tourism will gain a new dimension through the establishment of new relationships with the economy, law, transport, spatial planning, architecture, reception capacity, health, agriculture, culture , sports, etc. It is understood that not only the health security of tourism is important, but also the health security of the local population. Cover photo: Porapak Apichodilok/ Pexels.comlast_img read more

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Hill, Donovan step to front

first_imgLAS VEGAS — Needing something — anything — to avoid becoming the next highly-ranked team to fall in the early weeks of 2007, Wisconsin’s leaders showed their true colors.Running back P.J. Hill shouldered the load all game long when the offense wasn’t at its best, and quarterback Tyler Donovan put his body in harm’s way to give the Badgers the win.Hill wanted the ball in his hand on every down, despite game-time temperatures in the upper 90s.”That’s the kind of player P.J. is. He wants the ball in his hands,” Donovan said. “He’s a playmaker, gamebreaker — a guy that you love to have on your team.”Although tired, hot and facing a defense with seemingly relentless energy, Hill plowed his way for his biggest three yards of the game on fourth-and-one from UNLV’s 39-yard line.”I got on the headphones with coach (Paul) Chryst and just said, ‘give me the ball, give me the ball,’ because I knew we were in a tight jam, and sometimes the weight is on my back, so I just took it upon myself to tell him, ‘just give it to me,'” Hill said.Hill finished with 147 yards on 30 carries, but it was fifth-year senior Donovan who carried Wisconsin to victory, hurdling over the diving reach of Rebel linebacker Starr Fuimaono behind the line and, with a terrific seal block from wide receiver Luke Swan, diving into the far corner of the end zone, just inside the markers. The touchdown capped a 10-play, 61-yard drive that spanned 5:40.”I was going to do everything in my power to make him miss and go down and get a score,” Donovan said.Donovan, who has had trouble maintaining his balance in the open field, slipping and sliding for whatever reason, looked seamless on his 29-yard game-winning scamper.During the run, Donovan could only think about one thing: going all out.”You have to thrive in those situations,” Donovan said. “At the quarterback position, you have to step up and be a leader and show the guys the way.”I thought that this was a really good test for our team.”Not only did Donovan exhibit the traits of a leader — toughness, willingness to do whatever it takes — on that game-winning drive, he radiated that persona on nearly every down.When his receivers got locked up downfield Donovan was forced to keep it himself on a number of occasions. Instead of giving himself up to the defense, like many quarterbacks do to save themselves by sliding, Donovan would fight for the first down. Sometimes brutal hits resulted.Coolly, Donovan would walk them off and live to play another down.”That’s the type of player I am — step ups, make plays,” Donovan said. “Every yard counts, so that’s P.J. getting that extra yard [on fourth down] and that’s me getting that yard.”While the receivers struggled to catch some passes and Donovan himself wasn’t at his best, he and Hill found a way to rally the team around them and come through with a victory.”There will be several teams in the country this year that will be put in the same situation on the road, hostile environment because you made it that way, didn’t play well in the first half and got ourselves into a dogfight,” Bielema said. “But the way they handled themselves in the third and fourth quarter, it was a collective team effort to get a win.”Of his leaders Donovan and Hill, Bielema thinks his team has two good model citizens when it comes to football.”I think that they refuse to lose,” he said. “Late in the third quarter, things began to unfold defensively especially. They just find a spirit, something inside of them to take over a game and win it.”last_img read more

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County Senior Football Championship results

first_imgClonmel Commercials and Cahir threw in at half three.Cahir took an early lead with a goal in the first minute or so of the game, and they followed it up with a second in the fifth minute.It looked to be an exciting game, however, as Clonmel fought their way back into it to take the win.That game finished up Commercials 21, Cahir 3-8.Then this evening Drom& Inch face JK Brackens in Templetuohy at 6; Kilsheelan-Kilcash take on Killenaule in Monroe at 7 and Moyle Rovers play Aherlow Gaels in Cahir at 7. In the County Senior Football Championship Galtee Rovers took on Ardfinnan in New Inn.Half time there saw Galtee rovers leading 1-8 to 6 points.The final score there was Galtee Rovers 3-10, Ardfinnan 12 points.last_img

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3 busted with 4409 grams of ganja in car trunk

first_imgThree men are now in custody after they were intercepted with 4409 grams of cannabis during a Police operation on Tuesday evening along the Number 51 Village Public Road, Corentyne, Berbice.Guyana Times understands that one of the men resides at Tucber Park, New Amsterdam; another at Norton Street, Lodge, Georgetown; and the third is from Betsy Ground, Canje, Berbice.Based on reports gathered, the men were heading to Springlands in a grey Toyota 212 motor car bearing registration number PRR 654 when Police ranks stopped them at a road block.Upon realising that the men were acting in a suspicious manner, the Police requested to search the vehicle during which the marijuana was found in five separate plastic bags in the trunk of the car.The men were immediately arrested. They are expected to make their court appearance soon.Only a few days ago, Police in the Ancient County arrested a New Amsterdam, Berbice man following the discovery of a quantity of marijuana in his minibus during a Police operation on the Number 51 Public Road.It was reported that Police ranks, acting on a tip, stopped the minibus and conducted a search during which a black haversack was found.When the ranks opened the bag, they found several parcels with seeds, leaves and stems.They were confirmed to be marijuana and weighed, amounting to 1680 grams. The minibus driver was arrested. He is also expected to be charged soon.last_img read more

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Pedestrian hit by car

first_imgThe RCMP received a call from a female stated she had been hit by a car.At approximately 11am on Friday March 19th, the female says she was struck by a red car at the intersection of 92A street and 87th avenue in Fort St. John.The driver of the vehicle, described as a female with blonde hair, left the scene without stopping.  The pedestrian did not seek medical attention and sustained minor injuries to her hip.- Advertisement -Police are looking for a possible witness who came to the rescue of the pedestrian.  This possible witness did not leave his information and the Police are looking to speak with him.The Fort St. John RCMP are asking for the public’s assistance in identifying the person or person’s responsible for this hit and run.You can contact the RCMP at 250-787-7100 or Crimestoppers at 1-800-222-8477 or online at www.crimestoppersfsj.ca Advertisementlast_img read more

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Rural areas being ‘left behind’ as government fails to bridge gap, councillor warns

first_imgA Glenties councillor has expressed concern over the disrepair and lack of funding being provided to rural areas in west Donegal. Cllr Micheal Cholm MacGiolla Easbuig raised concern over the summer after an elderly wheelchair user and his extended family had been left trapped in their homes after heavy rain washed away a bridge leading to their property. Meanwhile, a resident in the area also told Donegal Daily how ‘something drastic’ was going to happen on the Glen Road in Angaire if it wasn’t repaired by Donegal County Council. The concern comes as Fianna Fail and Fine Gael have become embroiled in an argument in recent days in relation to government funding for rural communities.Now further concern has been expressed, with Cllr Cholm MacGiolla Easbuig highlighting a deteriorated footpath in Anagaire, suggesting to Donegal Daily that it was a testament to how the people in rural west Donegal had been ‘forgotten’.He said: “If you look at the footpath, it is completely crumbling away. How is that acceptable?“And for me as a councillor, one of the major frustrations is that stuff like this is cropping up every day and it shouldn’t be. “This should be fixed by the council and a big issue shouldn’t be made about it, but it isn’t being done and that is a problem.“I shouldn’t have to fight for these issues or highlight them one after the other.“The government are failing to adequately fund the council and that means we are scraping the bottom of the barrel.“And when small projects, like the footpath in Anagaire, occur it means you have to go in search of money.“We have a situation now were our footpaths are overgrowing with weeds and they are not being maintained,” he added. “We need to have the council-funded adequately because rural parts of this county are being left behind and forgotten about.”Rural areas being ‘left behind’ as government fails to bridge gap, councillor warns was last modified: September 19th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Ohio Ag Net Podcast | Episode 49 | Dairy Troubles, Mini Herefords, Farm Bill, and National Ag Week

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio Ag Net Podcast, brought to you by AgriGold, brings together the crew of Ty Higgins, Dale Minyo, Matt Reese, and Joel Penhorwood after a busy past week.The Ohio Beef Expo recently wrapped up. While there, Joel talked with Tim Bryan whose family shows Mini Herefords at the Expo. The unique breed is special in more than its look.Ty brings us an interview from his trip to Washington D.C. on the Ohio Farm Bureau County Presidents Trip with AFBF’s Dale Moore. The 2018 Farm Bill faces an interesting road ahead.Dale visited with Ohio Director of Agriculture David Daniels in the celebration of Ohio Ag Week recently. The two attended an ag museum opening in northeast Ohio.Matt caught up with a couple of people on pressing issues. He visited with OSU Extension Climate Specialist Aaron Wilson. And talking the interesting time for dairy farmers, he also heard from Mark Thomas, a dairy farmer in Stark County who has decided to sell the dairy side of his operation.last_img read more

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Smarter Imagery

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest By Matt WildeDTN Progressive Farmer Crops Technology EditorImages captured 5,000 feet above Greg Armes’ cotton fields are more than just pretty pictures.The high-resolution photos taken by Ceres Imaging, based in Oakland, California, are intricate and colorful. The New Home, Texas, farmer often looks at them on his iPad or iPhone as he’s spraying or at home after a long day in the field.The vibrant blues, greens, reds and yellows that stand out on the mobile devices are beautiful to Armes in a different way. The colors depict plant health and vigor.He said aerial imagery paired with analytics provide vital information to make better in-season decisions to boost pounds and profit per acre. It’s something the first-time imagery user wasn’t able to do before.“I’ll be able to fix problems before it’s too late,” Armes said. “In today’s farm economy, every acre has to pull its own weight.”Farmers and agronomists have used photos from satellites and airplanes for more than 30 years to scout fields and check crop health. Drones were added to the mix the past decade using a combination of pictures and live video to spot drainage issues, weather- and pest-related crop damage, and plant health.The information was mostly used to correct problems for future growing seasons. Industry experts say ag imagery and technology have evolved the last few years to allow farmers to be more proactive than reactive when making agronomic and other decisions.GAME CHANGERMany people believe this is a game changer, much like the advent of mechanization and biotechnology.Put Ceres Imaging customer John Vaadeland in that category. The agronomist and crop consultant from Park Rapids, Minnesota, previously used satellites to get a bird’s-eye view of potato and row-crop fields. It took weeks to get back pictures with little to no data included. Now, airplanes do the job. He gets some visual and agronomic feedback almost immediately, and more detailed information within hours or days.“In the 1990s, imagery had potential, but there wasn’t a good way to utilize it right away,” Vaadeland said. “There was a pretty picture that you printed off that showed variations in the field that was maybe nutrient- or disease-related, but the technology wasn’t advanced enough to make timely decisions.“Today, we can use high-quality imagery to make variable-rate fertilizer and fungicide applications, and see if our nutrient plans are working right away,” he continued. “It’s things we dreamed about in the past but are now reality.”BIG DATA, BIG CHANGESAerial imagery helps farmers maintain and increase production, explained Matthew Darr, a professor of agricultural and biosystems engineering at Iowa State University (ISU).Multispectral sensors — RGB (red, blue, green), chlorophyll, thermal and NDVI (normalized difference vegetation index), etc. — can identify distressed plants, often before the human eye can detect problems.Darr contends imagery’s true power was unleashed a few years ago when it was combined with big data — structured and unstructured information whose scale, diversity and complexity require new architecture, techniques and algorithms, and analytics to manage and extract value and hidden knowledge. It provides farmers the opportunity to fertilize, irrigate (if available) or spray to kill weeds, and ward off pests before they take a toll on yields.“You were just buying data or just a picture four to six years ago,” Darr said. “(Now) products have been developed providing an easy button, giving us some analytics to go along with the image. The exciting thing today is you can point to in-season solutions.”Darr, director of ISU BioCentury Research Farm and Digital Agriculture Innovations Team, conducts drone and imagery research. He also uses both to keep tabs on thousands of acres cropped by ISU.Imagery improvement from an acre-by-acre view to row-by-row and plant-by-plant views better and pinpoints problem areas in fields, Darr said. Pairing high-resolution photos with past and current agronomic data provides better information to increase precision and efficiency of farming operations.But it isn’t a silver bullet.“If you buy a treadmill, it doesn’t guarantee you will get in shape,” Darr explained. “The probability of it paying is proportional to the producer engaging with the analytics or information.”TURNKEY IMAGERY SOLUTIONSThere are multiple companies operating in this field. Firms like Ceres Imaging and Intelinair, with offices in San Francisco and Champaign, Illinois, are at the forefront of offering farmers turnkey crop imagery and data analysis services.Ceres Imaging focuses on aerial imagery and analytics geared to help customers improve decision-making by providing a comprehensive view of their farm. Founded to help fruit and nut tree farmers, it quickly expanded to millions of row-crop acres.“We can see proactively what’s happening in the field,” said Chad Scebold, Ceres Imaging director of sales and strategic accounts.Growers in Australia, California, Hawaii and the Midwest pay $4 to $6 per acre to have high-resolution, multispectral images taken from low-flying planes throughout the growing season. Examples include:— Thermal imagery that measures plant transpiration to expose the variation between canopy and ambient temperature, detailing moisture, pest and disease stress;— near-infrared and visible spectra combined into a leaf chlorophyll index, a strong indicator of nitrogen content;— NDVI used to benchmark vegetative vigor;— up to six different ranges of light wavelengths, ranging from visible to far-infrared.Images are processed and stitched together with a resolution ranging from .02 to 1 meter per pixel. Ceres Imaging claims crop-modeling techniques reveal accurate, real-time information about the water, nutrient and health status of every plant. Customers receive information after every flight within 24 to 48 hours.“Traditionally, we didn’t know until the end of the season if we did well,” Scebold said.Intelinair’s flagship product is AgMRI. It also uses high-resolution multispectral images taken from manned aircraft, along with environmental and agronomic data. Hyperspectral analysis, computer vision to process images and deep learning to identify patterns ultimately build a precise situational representation of every monitored field for the entire growing season.Farmers, insurance companies and ag retailers make up the bulk of Intelinair’s customer base throughout the Midwest, said Josh Thornsbrough, Intelinair vice president of sales and marketing. The company declined to say how many acres it covers. “As we keep introducing AI (artificial intelligence) and machine learning into this, farmers will get very early opportunities to create massive yield increases,” he said.Intelinair’s basic package is $5 per acre, which includes up to 13 flights based on the crop and growing season. Customers receive data back within a day or two after every flight on any device they choose, along with action alerts when a problem needs to be addressed.“Our customers don’t necessarily want to see every image, they want to know when something needs to be addressed,” Thornsbrough continued.EYE IN THE SKYCeres Imaging and Intelinair prefer manned aircraft over drones and satellites. Planes can cover more acres quicker and carry more high-tech equipment, officials said.Images reveal disease pressure, parasites and weeds. They show where irrigation and fertilizer are over- or underapplied. Irregular distribution of plants also can be spotted. Analytics and algorithms highlight year-over-year trends during critical points of the growing season. Growers can use the data to develop and optimize management zones.Ceres Imaging’s Scebold and his family farm about 2,000 acres of mostly irrigated corn and soybeans in southwest Iowa and southeast Nebraska, along the Missouri River. They are also Ceres Imaging customers.“Being able to react in-season and judge the results changed the game for us,” Scebold said. “We do a lot of nutrient applications through pivots.”As farmers evaluate providers in the imagery and analytics space, Darr said farmers need to set goals and compare them to packages companies offer.“If you rotationally farm for 40 years, you only have 20 to plant corn in a field,” Darr said. “Adding knowledge and adopting methods to reduce man-made yield losses is a key service that high-resolution imagery and analytics provide.”Texas’ Armes spends about every day in his fields. But, he admitted there’s no way to spot every problem.“It’s another eye in the sky that can help me,” he said. “It helps me sleep better at night not worrying about past problems and things I might miss.”RETURN ON INVESTMENTArmes has no doubt the $4.50 per acre he pays Ceres Imaging for a six-flight package is a good investment. He also is a dealer for the company. About two-thirds of Armes’ 5,500 acres, of which 65% are irrigated, will be covered this year.The following are examples of past issues he hopes to correct or avoid:— An irrigator malfunction causing 10 acres out of a 120-acre circle to receive too little or too much moisture;— a solenoid on a drip irrigator that’s stuck over and under watering areas;— a missed fertilizer pass with a coulter rig;— aphid, spider mite and nematode pressure curtailing yields.“I’ll know if there’s a problem early; that’s where I think imagery will help,” Armes said. “I want every acre to produce like the rest.”Armes’ production goal is 1,250 to 1,500 pounds of cotton per acre. The low end of the range, or 2 1/4 bales, is needed to make a profit on irrigated land.Even spotty problems can turn black ink to red.“I need every pound I can get,” Armes added.Three August flights to determine final moisture needs may be the moneymaker, Armes explained. It costs $1,000 to apply 1 inch of water per 120-acre circle.“If I can save a couple inches of water, my breakeven goes down to 1 1/2 bales,” he explained. “I think it will be easy to get my money back and then some.”Recent Intelinair surveys indicate customer ROI on average per acre includes the following items:— $4.51: proactive in-season decisions including harvest timing, fungicide and herbicide applications, etc.;— $5.37: management practices including variable-rate fungicide and herbicide applications, irrigator adjustments, etc.;— $5.34: whole-farm intelligence, including operation efficiency, chemical effectiveness, etc.;— $7.48; equipment optimization, including equipment calibration, irrigator fix, etc.This is the third year Intelinair has provided imagery and data to Corey Holmes, New Holland, Illinois. He farms a couple thousand acres with his father, Rick, spread out 150 miles east to west and 80 miles north to south.There’s no way to effectively scout that many acres over a wide geographic area, Holmes admitted. He conservatively estimates the operation is doubling in return the money spent with Intelinair by timely spraying corn for gray leafspot, finding underirrigated acres and other issues in-season.“We’re making more timely agronomic decisions,” he said. “We’re seeing all our fields all the time, and that’s a big thing.HANDS-ON IMAGERY:Drones and analytics make a powerful, timely pair.Farmers who prefer to capture their own aerial imagery can now receive better and quicker actionable data than ever before.Drones, technology and analytics have advanced to the point operators can take high-resolution, multispectral images of hundreds of acres a day. Farmers can get some feedback on plant health immediately and more in-depth analysis within hours or days.“There’s a lot of good cloud-based tools now to do image processing, analysis and stitching,” said Matthew Darr, an Iowa State University professor and technology expert. “If farmers have the interest and time, it’s a great opportunity to do it themselves or create a side business.”Dennis Bogaards, of Pella, Iowa, does both. The corn and soybean farmer uses and sells drones for Flying AG. He’s also a drone instructor.A wet spring convinced him to expand drone use on his farm beyond scouting to crop analysis. He purchased a DJI Mavic 2 quadcopter from Flying AG. It features a three-axis gimbal stabilized camera housing a side-by-side 4K sensor for capturing visible light and an imaging sensor for thermal data.Bogaards likes that he can check plant health on most of his 1,100 acres from his yard at any time. He uploads images to DroneDeploy, a DJI drone software company that processes and analyzes them to detect crop variability, fertilizer deficiencies and pest pressure, among other things.“I’ll get more actionable information to preserve and increase yields,” Bogaards said. He lost about 250 acres of corn this season because of prevented planting and standing water. “Keeping what I have is that much more important.”He can fly about 80 acres in 25 minutes. GPS guidance makes it easy, Bogaards stated.“It takes time, but controlling the quality is much easier doing it yourself,” he added.(Sidebar)MORE ACRES FAST:AeroVironment, based in Simi Valley, California, has a drone and analytics system that can cover and analyze multiple acres fast and accurately.Quantix, a VTOL hybrid fixed-wing drone with fully automated vertical takeoff and landing, can cover up to 400 acres in 45 minutes. It switches to horizontal flight to do it.The craft sports two onboard 18-megapixel true-color and multispectral cameras. Resolution is down to 1 inch and 2 inches per pixel, respectively. Quantix is integrated with AeroVironment’s online data analytics platform that processes images to provide insight to farmers into plant emergence, vegetative health and resource management.“The system is designed to be turnkey out of the box,” said Mark DuFau, AeroVironment director of business development. “From the field to the computer, you have a data delivery system for farmers and agronomists.”Ashley Runholt, an agronomist for Cottonwood Co-op Oil Co., in Cottonwood, Minnesota, uses the system to scout thousands of acres.She was able to spot a nutrient issue in a corn field. It was the width of an anhydrous bar that malfunctioned. Ten acres were sidedressed, which likely saved a 600-bushel loss.“That was an impressive find,” Runholt said. “With today’s market, we’ll do whatever we can do to get a good return on investment.”FOR MORE PRICING AND PRODUCT INFORMATION:— www.avdroneanalytics.com— www.flyingag.com— www.dronedeploy.comFOR MORE INFORMATION:— Ceres Imaging: www.ceresimaging.net— Intelinair: www.intelinair.comMatthew Wilde can be reached at [email protected] him on Twitter @progressivwilde(ES/AG)© Copyright 2019 DTN/The Progressive Farmer. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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10 months agoAA Gent in Crystal Palace talks for Alexander Sorloth

first_imgAA Gent in Crystal Palace talks for Alexander Sorlothby Paul Vegas10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveCrystal Palace have welcomed an approach from AA Gent for Alexander Sorloth.The Belgians are keen on a loan deal for the Norway international, says HLN.And Palace are happy with the proposal, believing six months away will do Sorloth’s self-belief some good.At Gent, the striker will be reunited with his former FC Midtjylland coach Jess Thorup.With FCM, Sorloth scored 10 goals in 19 games in 2017 before joining Palace for €9m. TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img

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