Peterson case creates new crisis for NFL

first_imgIn this Sept. 7, 2014, file photo, Minnesota Vikings running back Adrian Peterson warms up for an NFL football game against the St. Louis Rams in St. Louis. The Vikings benched Peterson for Sunday’s game after his attorney said he had been indicted by a Texas grand jury on a charge of child abuse. (AP Photo/Tom Gannam, File)MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Minnesota Vikings star running back Adrian Peterson’s booking on a child abuse charge Saturday has created another crisis for the embattled NFL, already derided for not responding strongly enough to acts of domestic violence by its players.It also has touched off a national debate about the role of corporal punishment in parenting.In the eyes of a Texas grand jury, Peterson crossed the line when he repeatedly struck his son with a tree branch, or switch, in May. Peterson’s attorney has said he has never run from what happened — and that Peterson was inflicting the same discipline he endured as a child.“Obviously, parents are entitled to discipline their children as they see fit, except when that discipline exceeds what the community would say is reasonable,” Montgomery County Prosecutor Phil Grant said about 12 hours after Peterson was booked and released from jail on $15,000 bond. He is charged with causing injury to a child age 14 or younger.Peterson, one of the NFL’s most popular players and widely considered one of the best running backs to ever play, flew from Minnesota to Houston in the early morning hours after authorities indicted him on Friday evening. He has a home in both locations.The Vikings almost immediately decided to deactivate him for Sunday’s game against the New England Patriots, and NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy said on Saturday that Peterson’s case “will be reviewed under the NFL’s personal conduct policy.”The situation comes as the NFL proceeds with a self-commissioned investigation by a former FBI director into how it handled the case of Ray Rice, who knocked his then-fiancee unconscious in an Atlantic City elevator. Rice was released Monday from the Baltimore Ravens after a video surfaced that showed the violence. The NFL said it hadn’t seen the video before then, but a law enforcement source told the AP it was sent to a league executive’s office in April and provided a voice mail confirming it was received.Unlike Rice’s situation, Peterson’s case is complicated by his stance that he meant his son no harm but rather was applying the same discipline he experienced growing up.“Adrian is a loving father who used his judgment as a parent to discipline his son. He used the same kind of discipline with his child that he experienced as a child growing up in East Texas,” Peterson’s attorney, Rusty Hardin, said.Steve Eudey, who coached Peterson as a young boy in Palestine, Texas, and has remained a family friend, said he has heard stories from Peterson about his father Nelson “being a firm disciplinarian.”“Some of the things his dad did to him was to make him tough,” Eudey told The Associated Press.Eudey said he had yet to speak to Peterson since his arrest, but said his actions were consistent with the type of upbringing he had.“I will go to my grave defending Adrian, but at the same time you can’t harm a child, either,” Eudey said. “I know that was never his intent.”Grant, the Texas prosecutor, said the grand jury felt the charge was warranted after spending several weeks reviewing “lots of evidence.”It’s not unusual for people subjected to physical discipline as children to use corporal punishment against their own children, experts say, and courts will sometimes consider that as a mitigating factor when sentencing an abuser. Peterson faces up to two years in prison and a $10,000 fine if found guilty.News of Peterson’s charges led several prominent athletes to tweet about their experiences with corporal punishment when they were children.“Am I the only one that got hit with a switch? I had to go outside and pick my own switch. It taught values, respect (and) accountability,” former NBA star Tracy McGrady said. But he later qualified those remarks, tweeting, “Disciplining a child is vital. Of course any early physical punishment should be within reason, not overboard, and inside certain boundaries.”While the legal process plays out, the NFL is facing a potential test case for the tougher penalties it declared last month for players involved with domestic violence.Commissioner Roger Goodell announced an initial offense will draw a six-week suspension without pay, though “more severe discipline will be imposed if there are aggravating circumstances such as the presence or use of a weapon, choking, repeated striking, or when the act is committed against a pregnant woman or in the presence of a child.”It is not clear if Peterson’s case will invoke those penalties.Corporal punishment is legal in Texas, and the law spells out that non-deadly force against a child by a parent or guardian is permissible.But the punishment is abusive if it causes injury. While a blow that causes a red mark that fades in an hour is not likely to be judged abusive, a blow that leaves a bruise, welt, or swelling, or requires medical attention, could be judged abusive. The child’s injuries will likely be under scrutiny as the case proceeds.The guidelines also say while spanking with the bare, open hand is least likely to be abusive, use of an instrument “is cause for concern.”The Vikings jumped ahead of the NFL and the legal system by shelving Peterson for the game Sunday. Two other teams — Carolina and San Francisco — have taken heat for allowing players involved in alleged recent domestic violence incidents to continue to play.The team — and the league — will likely face scrutiny as they decide whether Peterson returns to the field as the legal process plays out. As of Saturday, no decision had been made about his outlook this season, and no court date had been set in Texas.___Associated Press writers Jeff Baenen in Eden Prairie, Minnesota, David J. Phillip in Spring, Texas, Mike Graczyk in Houston and Tim Jacobs and Jason Keyser in Chicago contributed to this report.___Online:AP NFL websites: http://www.pro32.ap.org and http://www.twitter.com/AP_NFLlast_img read more

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Power Line Opposition Is Charged Up

first_imgKyrillos and Beck are the latest to formally oppose the MCRP, joining a slew of other politicians. Among them are U.S. Rep. Chris Smith, U.S. Rep. Frank Pallone, Assemblywoman Amy Handlin, Assemblyman Declan O’Scanlon, the Monmouth County Board of Chosen Freeholders, 10 Bayshore mayors and the five affected township committees.“I basically spend my days making sure that everybody who promised to help us is actually helping, and I’m still trying to get new people on board,” Vilardi said.She also plans to sit down with gubernatorial candidate and Middletown resident Phil Murphy in the coming weeks to gauge his interest level on the subject.“Now we have all of our ducks in a row,” Musa said. “The reality is JCP&L has now filed its petition, so it’s real, its live.” Since the end of May, when residents who live within 200 feet of the proposed corridor first received letters from JCP&L informing them of the project, a small group called Residents Against Giant Electric (RAGE) began going door-to-door to educate neighbors of the project.Now, nearly four months later, RAGE has taken major steps in its effort to halt the MCRP.“We are incorporated, we are in the paper work phase of having applied for our 501(c)(4), which is a non-profit status for the IRS tax code,” said RAGE spokeswoman Judy Musa.A core of six members has helped RAGE grow since day one. They are: Rachael Kanapka, president; Steve Lunanuova, treasurer; Terri Vilardi, Middletown vice president; Rich Scotto-Lavino, Holmdel vice president; Frances Haies, Hazlet vice president and Jennifer Aquino, executive secretary. The group, which also has a strong social media presence across Facebook and Twitter, has nearly 4,400 followers combined who are tuned into daily announcements. By Jay CookTwo state senators have recently thrown their hats in the ring, opposing a utility project that would run through the heart of Monmouth County.Along with them, a local grassroots group, which has seen support grow steadily since inception, is doing everything it can to fight the project.Senators Joseph Kyrillos and Jennifer Beck (both R-Monmouth) have recently introduced three resolutions to the state Senate which would call for various entities across New Jersey to oppose the Monmouth County Reliability Project (MCRP), which is spearheaded by Jersey Central Power and Light company (JCP&L).“This project is no more welcome today than it was 25 or more years ago when JCP&L shelved it due to the blistering public opposition and other available options,” Kyrillos said in a statement.The duo called upon U.S. Senators Cory Booker and Bob Menendez, New Jersey’s representation in the House of Representatives’ and Governor Chris Christie to act and oppose the project. Also mentioned were the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC), along with NJ Transit, the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) and the Board of Public Utilities, where the MCRP petition was filed.The MCRP, as currently proposed, would be a 10-mile long, 230-KV transmission line that would span five towns through Monmouth County. The line would begin in Aberdeen, travel through Hazlet, Holmdel and Middletown and end in Red Bank, all along the NJ Transit North Jersey Coast Line commuter line right-of-way. The project’s estimated cost now stands at $111 million. In August and September, the group hosted a night of enter tainment, with appearances from Brian Kirk, The Havens and Vinnie Brand, at Windansea in Highlands. Two other restaurants, Texas Roadhouse and The Red Oak Diner and Lounge, both held events where proceeds of sales went straight to the group’s bank account.Businesses such as Five Below promoted RAGE by giving 10 percent of sales from purchases at the Holmdel store to the group during a back-to-school sale from Sept. 6 through Sept. 13.“We’re doing things at different price points so that people of various incomes can support us,” Musa said.Attending local town functions is also paramount to RAGE’s awareness campaign.center_img “I have to say, all the fundraisers that we’ve had so far have been very successful,” said Oak Hill resident Chrissy Maiorana. “We’ve had a lot of traffic, a lot of people come out, and they’re excited and happy to do it, so I would say we’ve had a pretty good response to all of our fundraisers.”Among the public events the group attended were the Friends of Clear water Festival, Aberdeen Day and Hazlet Day. RAGE will be represented at Middletown Day on Sept. 24 at Croydon Hall and the Holmdel Harvest Fest, which is planned for Oct. 1-2 at Bayonet Farms.The group’s style of gathering grassroots support has spread to essentially every politician with a constituency in the affected areas.“Senator Kyrillos has met with the RAGE group and they have an open line of communication with our office,” said Tony Perry, the director of legislative affairs for Kyrillos. Along with the uptick in supporters, online signatures come in daily via an online petition opposing the project. As of Sept. 20, 6,271 people have filled out the petition on Change.org.One of the benefits of using social media is spreading the word about local fundraisers.“RAGE is representing over 6,000 members; all the money that we make is going to the lawyer fees at this point,” said Vilardi, who also deals with fundraising and government relations. “We used it for marketing, we used it to educate the public, but now the focus of any incoming money that we raise has to go to our legal fees.”RAGE has partnered up with numerous local restaurants and companies to help raise funds.last_img read more

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Double whammy for Donegal as two Buncrana teachers nominated for new initiative

first_imgScoil Mhuire in Buncrana had double reason to celebrate this week, as two of its teachers were named on the shortlist for the inaugural Teachers Inspire Ireland initiative. The two Scoil Mhuire teachers included on the shortlist are Lorna Barron (from Buncrana) and Denise Dowds (from Muff and now living in Buncrana).The initiative, which is focused on highlighting the enormous contribution made by teachers in Irish society, was launched by Dublin City University (DCU) earlier this year. Over May and June, DCU called for members of the public to share their personal stories of how a teacher transformed their lives and/or their community.Twenty shortlisted teachers – five from each province – have been shortlisted from over 400 entries received from every corner of Ireland.  None of the teachers knew they were nominated in advance.Ms. Barron was nominated by student Alannah Bradley from Ballymagan, Buncrana.  In her nomination, Alannah wrote: “Ms. Barron is such a huge asset to Scoil Mhuire in every way, not just in her caring, kind attitude but also her ability to get a vast majority of students a high grade in their exams and push students to their potential.“No job or problem is too big for Ms. Barron either, from hosting the school’s successful musical every two years to being in charge of the examination aid for the State exams.” Denise Dowds was also nominated as one of Ireland’s most inspiring teachers by a current student, Marie Barr (from Upper Gransha, Buncrana).In her nomination, Marie described Ms. Dowds as a “climate hero”.“Ms. Dowds inspired me and 45 other students to stand up for what we believe in,” Barr wrote. “She set up a group called the Cli-Mates… to raise awareness about climate change and environmental issues and to take action against them.“This group has done many things, from beach clean-ups to climate strikes to telling people about how to be more environmentally friendly but, most importantly, it has given us a voice… She has given us this voice. She has taught us to use that voice and I am very thankful for that.”Additional Donegal connections on the Teachers Inspire shortlist come by way of Dublin.  One of the shortlisted teachers in Leinster is Nora Duffy, who taught at St. Joseph’s Co-Educational National School on the East Wall Road in Dublin for several decades. Originally from Dunfanaghy, Ms. Duffy arrived in the East Wall in the 1960s.  Her nominator, Caitríona Ní Cassaithe, highlighted her passion for the Irish language, amongst many other attributes, noting that “most East Wall Irish enthusiasts speak it (Irish) with a Northern twang – a nod to our school-day beginnings”.Another teacher to make the shortlist meanwhile is Mary Daly, who is originally from Castlefinn, but has lived in Celbridge since 1985.  Mary was a teacher at St. Dominic’s College in Ballyfermot, and was nominated for Teachers Inspire Ireland by her former student, Niamh Smith.Announcing the shortlist at DCU earlier this week, Professor Brian MacCraith, President of DCU, said: “The entries submitted to Teachers Inspire Ireland demonstrate just how significant a role teachers play in Irish life.“We received stories about teachers dealing in an inspirational way with major societal challenges.  We received stories of teachers who have played – and continue to play – a key part in helping individuals and whole communities adapt to change. Double whammy for Donegal as two Buncrana teachers nominated for new initiative was last modified: September 16th, 2019 by Shaun KeenanShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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Outsourcing to South Africa

first_imgAs companies worldwide respond to increasing cost and efficiency pressures, South Africa is becoming a favoured international location for business process outsourcing and offshoring.A massive banking call centre in Johannesburg. (Image: Brand South Africa)Brand South Africa reporterBusiness process outsourcing (BPO) and offshoring is a major global trend and the industry, worth an estimated US$130-billion a year, has an expected annual growth rate of about 50% for the next five years.BPO involves relocating business processes that a company usually performs in-house to a third-party service provider, such as a customer care or call centre, to carry out on behalf of the company. Outsourcing becomes offshoring when the third-party service provider is located overseas.The BPO industry’s focus sectors include financial services, insurance and telecommunications, with outsourced processes including after-sales services, data capture and conversion, accounting, benefits administration, human resource functions, and website design and development.Identified as a key sector in the government’s strategy to boost the country’s economy and create employment, business process outsourcing and offshoring is forecast to create 25 000 direct and 75 000 indirect jobs in South Africa and contribute up to R7.95-billion to the national economy by 2009.Information technology (IT) outsourcing is also a growing business in South Africa, with the diversity of the local market, first world know-how and a developing country environment making it an ideal test lab for new innovations.IT outsourcing makes up more than a third of the R30-billion IT services market, according to a study in 2008 by research and advisory firm IDC, taking up the largest share of all IT service categories.Gartner, the international research group, rates South Africa as one of its top 30 software development outsourcing destinations, with 2007 research putting it on par with Israel in the Europe, Middle East and Africa region, and next to Australia and India globally.Calling .ZAAccording to Business Day, the local call-centre industry has grown by about 8% a year since 2003. It directly employs about 54 000 people and contributes 0.92% to South Africa’s gross domestic product (GDP).A government-backed BPO support programme, launched in 2007, aims to enhance South Africa’s competitiveness and includes a budgeted R1.1-billion in investment incentives. The plan focuses on:A broad-based marketing strategy.A government support programme which includes an investment grant and training subsidies.A developmental pricing framework for telecommunications.Competitive advantagesFor international firms, South Africa slots in between near-shore locations such as Canada, Mexico or Eastern Europe, which offer close proximity as well as cultural affinity to domestic markets, and more traditional offshore locations, such as India and the Philippines, that offer cheap labour.South Africa has many factors working in its favour, including:World-class service levels of call centre staff.A broad base of management and service provider expertise, coupled with extensive financial services expertise, particularly in insurance, mortgage and loan processing and collection.Time-zone compatibility with Europe.High rates of fluency in English, coupled with neutral English accents that are easily understood in Western markets.A favourable exchange rate.Strong government support.State-backed incentives, such as start-up and expansion grants and discounted telecommunications prices.An advanced and growing telecommunications industry.The government is taking steps to ensure cheaper and more widely available bandwidth capacity, which will allow cheaper international phone calls. Major projects are also under way to lay submarine fibre-optic cables along both the east and west coasts of Africa to boost the continent’s connection with the rest of the world.World in one countryInternational companies that have already chosen South Africa as a BPO destination include IBM, Fujitsu Siemens, Lufthansa, Virgin, Sykes, Avis and the Car Phone Warehouse.South Africa’s commitment to the BPO industry was underscored in 2007 by the decision to build a R125-million, 1 500-seat call centre at the Coega Industrial Development Zone outside Port Elizabeth in the Eastern Cape.The BPO Park covers five hectares in Coega’s business service precinct and includes training facilities and recreational space. The managing company said the space was designed to cater for various scenarios and could accommodate numerous different investors.Other recent investments include:In May 2008, oil multinational Royal Dutch Shell opened a call centre in Cape Town. The centre will service Shell’s customers in Belgium, Luxembourg and the Netherlands, with native Afrikaans-speaking operators trained to converse in Dutch and Flemish.In November 2007, US-based business process outsourcing giant TeleTech started  construction on its first facility on the African continent, at the Old Match Factory in Salt River, Cape TownBusiness Process Enabling South AfricaDepartment of Trade and IndustryCoega Development CorporationBusiness DayWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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Vapor Barriers Redux

first_imgNo, the problem is air leakageGBA senior editor Martin Holladay suggests Taylor may be confusing air barriers and vapor retarders. “If you pay attention to air tightness (by following the Airtight Drywall Approach), there is every reason to believe that your proposed wall would function very well in Chicago, even without vapor retarder paint,” Holladay writes.“However, your local building code probably requires the use of a vapor retarder on the interior side of your wall — so you should probably go ahead and install kraft facing (the kind that accompanies fiberglass batts) or vapor retarder paint (if you choose cellulose — the better choice), just to keep the building inspector happy.”More to the point, Holladay says, is to choose a builder who understands how to make a building airtight. Ideally, that would extend to the drywall contractor. “There’s no reason to build a brand-new house with contractors who don’t understand these principles,” he says. “‘How risky is this?’ is the wrong question. The right question is, ‘Why would I want to choose contractors who don’t know how to do a good job?’”As to Taylor’s assertion that a poly vapor barrier, when installed correctly, is a viable means of controlling moisture, Holladay says: “Malcolm’s advice is appropriate for many locations in Canada, but is not recommended in the U.S., especially for buildings that will be air conditioned. Leave out the polyethylene unless you have a maple leaf on your flag.” Don’t forget, vapor barriers had a purposeMalcolm Taylor reminds Ed that problems associated with the movement of interior moisture is what prompted builders to begin using vapor barriers some 40 years ago, and that walls built in the manner Ed describes may indeed experience problems.“You need to go back to why vapor barriers were introduced into exterior walls in the first place,” Taylor writes. “Indoor moisture making its way into wall cavities really wasn’t much of a problem until the 1970s, when the push to conserve energy lead to widespread use of (mainly) batt insulation. In Canada this was pushed by the CMHC [Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation], and it was the widespread wall failures of the houses they had sponsored that was largely responsible for that adoption of poly vapor barriers as a way of mitigating air movement into the exterior walls.”Taylor says other strategies are available, including the Airtight Drywall Approach and the use of exterior insulating sheathing. “But,” he adds, “I don’t think anyone is advocating building without some method of limiting the movement of air through exterior walls.”The problem with vapor barriers, Taylor says, crops up when they are placed in such a way that the wall does not have a means of drying out. “The reason the wall would have moisture to dry in the first place would in most cases be that there was not an effective vapor barrier.”Later, Taylor adds this: “I’m not advocating for their use, but at present, outside the rarified world of green building and it’s one-off projects, sealed poly represents a viable method of stopping air movement that doesn’t interfere with common building practices as they are done throughout most of this continent.” Our expert’s opinionHere’s how GBA technical director Peter Yost looks at it:There are four ways that buildings can get wet: a bulk water leak, capillary suction or wicking in porous materials, convective moisture (air leaks), and vapor moving by diffusion. You should worry pretty much in that order, regardless of climate. And yes, an assembly getting wet by diffusion alone is largely a cold climate issue, or an issue in buildings with inherently high interior relative humidity (like an indoor swimming pool), or both. For all other situations, reliance on just that continuous air barrier is the best way to keep interior or exterior moisture from getting into assemblies.We avoid Class I vapor retarders (0.1 perms or less, like polyethylene) if we can because they restrict drying and because, when used to keep moisture out of a wall or ceiling, are usually complete overkill. But other factors matter too: for example, the indoor and outdoor relative humidities, as well as the vapor permeability of all the OTHER layers in the wall or ceiling assembly. (For more information on these topics, see Vapor Profiles Help Predict Whether a Wall Can Dry and Are Dew-Point Calculations Really Necessary?)Walls can get wet from mechanisms other than those already mentioned: for example due to solar-driven moisture or wicking from mortar continuity in veneer masonry. In general, you want to take all the drying potential you can find, rather than unnecessarily restricting drying with less vapor-permeable retarders than required by wintertime interior relative humidities.I would add that if your building inspector pushes you to install a dedicated interior vapor retarder, “smart” materials such as CertainTeed’s MemBrain or Pro Clima’s DB+ or Intello Plus should be considered in cold climates.There is some evidence that asphalt-impregnated kraft paper facings do not really stand up to repeated wetting and drying — at least in terms of their variable vapor permeability — like the other “smart” retarders do. Few topics in building science seem to have caused as much confusion as the use of a polyethylene vapor barrier in exterior walls.Once routinely used by builders to prevent the migration of interior moisture into wall cavities, polyethylene is no longer recommended for houses unless they’re built in extremely cold climates.But related questions keep coming, including this query from Ed in Chicago, which was posted in the Q&A forum at GreenBuildingAdvisor: “It’s well known that improper use of vapor retarders can prevent walls from drying out properly and leading to moisture related issues such as mold and rot,” Ed writes. “Is it uncommon to have moisture issues in walls due to air leaks or vapor diffusion if the vapor retarder is left out? Would there be a concern with moisture issues for a standard construction wall (siding, plywood sheathing, 2×4 or 2×6 framing, fiberglass or cellulose insulation, drywall without vapor retarding paint) if the vapor barrier is not used in cold climates?”The house under construction (not Ed’s, but the house of someone he knows) won’t include a poly vapor barrier — but the builder doesn’t plan any special effort to make it airtight, either. RELATED ARTICLES Vapor diffusion from the interior toward the exterior is an unlikely threatDana Dorsett points out that the major moisture threat is wind-driven rain leaking past improperly flashed windows and doors — what’s called “bulk leakage.”That’s followed by air leakage, he adds, “with vapor diffusion at an extremely distant third place, as much attention as vapor-retarders get in code. If an assembly can be designed to work without poly vapor barriers, it SHOULD be built without them, in my opinon, since (a) In practice the poly is rarely airtight, and (b) poly severely inhibits drying, whether airtight or not.”Dorsett continued,“In most of the lower-48 of the U.S., the rampant misapplication of poly in locations where it can just as easily be designed-out has caused as many real-world problems as it was intended to solve, and that would include Chicago. Summertime dew points in Chicago are high enough that a ‘drying toward the exterior only’ approach can create mold problems in air-conditioned houses with interior poly and fiber insulation, with or without ai-tight sheathing (or airtight wallboard), especially those with stucco or brick cladding. (Brick cladding and interior poly can be an issue for air conditioned buildings in Winnipeg, too.)” “It seems like every story I hear about wall moisture problems is because of improper use of vapor barriers, not because it was left out,” Ed wrote. “Is there concern that leaving out the vapor barrier without making the house reasonably airtight lead to a moisture problem?”That’s the subject of this month’s Q&A Spotlight. Vapor Retarders and Vapor BarriersForget Vapor Diffusion — Stop the Air Leaks!Do I Need a Vapor Retarder?Installing Fiberglass RightQuestions and Answers About Air Barriers Building Science Corp. Report on High R-value Wallslast_img read more

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UK demand fuels 46 rise in exports of Canadian wood pellets NEB

first_imgCALGARY – The National Energy Board says exports of Canadian wood pellets to be burned as biomass fuel jumped by 46 per cent in 2016 as demand soared in the United Kingdom.The federal agency says Canada exported 2.4 billion kilograms in 2016, making it the second-largest exporter by weight after the United States. About 70 per cent was shipped to the U.K. and 11 per cent to Japan.The Canadian industry has grown by 73 per cent over the past four years, the NEB says. About 65 per cent of Canada’s pellets are produced in British Columbia.In July, Tokyo-based Sumitomo Corp. paid an undisclosed amount to buy a 48-per-cent stake in B.C. pellet maker Pacific BioEnergy Corp. to ensure a supply for its power plants in Japan.Wood pellets are made from forest industry waste such as bark and sawdust and are considered a renewable energy resource that’s easier to burn than solid wood.The NEB says the rise in demand is linked to decisions around the world to phase out coal.last_img read more

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Ackerman says taking bull by the horns helped city rise in best

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Mayor Lori Ackerman woke up on Tuesday to see the Energetic City climb 145 spots since last year on Money Sense magazine’s best places to live in Canada.Ackerman explained that when she found out that Fort St. John was ranked the best place to live in B.C. and 15th best in Canada she was ecstatic.“To see that Fort St. John has made this significant standing as the number 15 in Canada and number one in B.C. place to live is pretty phenomenal,” said Ackerman. Ackerman added that much of the city’s improvement has been due to city council taking the bull by the horns in ways of recruiting more workers and listening to resident feedback.“We’ve done a lot of public consultation over the last decade. We have listened to what the people have wanted and quite often over different council meetings we have gone to the public and asked ‘what do you want?’”Ackerman mentioned that they have focused heavily on community economic development because when there is a beautiful community, the economic development will develop itself. Making sure cores services stay maintained such as water, sewers and lights was a key point for the city.“We have to continue to demonstrate leadership and environmental responsibility. We are on the world stage with our passive house and to be able to showcase Fort St. John for just that one amenity is significant.”Ackerman went on to say that the city would soon unveil a community plan to focus on the community’s vision and work hard on making the city even more livable in the winter.last_img read more

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Football Ohio State defensive tackle Malik Barrow will miss season with torn

Ohio State redshirt freshman defensive tackle Malik Barrow will miss the rest of the season due to a torn ACL he suffered during the Buckeyes’ 54-21 win versus UNLV Saturday, head coach Urban Meyer announced Monday.“It’s just a tough — prayers for him,” Meyer said. “He’s such a good kid.”Barrow has not played much in the first four games of the season and has not recorded a tackle. He played in Saturday’s blowout victory with Ohio State’s backups.The former four-star prospect from Tampa, Florida, suffered an ACL injury in his other knee as a senior at IMG Academy.

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Real Madrid to rival Premier League sides for Napolis Piotr Zielinski

first_imgReal Madrid are reportedly both keen on Napoli midfielder Piotr ZielinskiThe Poland international has also been linked with moves to both Manchester City and Liverpool, despite only recently signing a new long-term contract at Napoli.Zielinski is believed to have a new buy-out clause of €120m inserted into the deal.Now Calcio Mercato claims that Real have stepped up their interest in Zielinski after learning that both City and Liverpool have made contact.Sergio Ramos, Real MadridZidane reveals Sergio Ramos injury concern for Real Madrid Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Zinedine Zidane has put Sergio Ramos’ availability for Real Madrid’s trip to Sevilla next weekend in doubt after withdrawing him against Levante.The Premier Leagues sides are both desperate to sign the 24-year-old and are determined to take the fight to Real for his services next summer.Zielinski joined Napoli from Udinese in the summer of 2016 and managed seven goals and three assists in 47 appearances across all competitions for the Italian giants last season.The versatile midfielder has also added six goals and eight assists for Poland in 37 games.last_img read more

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