CHAMPIONSHIP DRAW: HOLDERS EUNAN’S GET GLENSWILLY IN LAST EIGHT

first_imgTHE quarter-final draw of the RTÉ Raidió na Gaeltachta Senior Football Championship will feature a re-run of last year’s final with holders St Eunan’s drawn to play Glenswilly in the last eight.Kilcar take on Four Masters, favourites St Michael’s will play Malin and Naomh Conaill will take on Termon.Quarter Finals of the SFC Kilcar v Four MastersSt Michael’s v MalinGlenswilly v St Eunan’sNaomh Conaill v Termon The relegation play-offsKillybegs v Sean MacCumhaill’sArdara v CloughaneelyReservesArdara v Naomh Muire Glenswilly v St Eunan’sSt Michael’s v Four MastersKilcar v Gaoth DobhairIntermediate Football Championship Gaeil Fhanáda v Naomh ColumbaBundoran v Naomh BrídAodh Ruadh v MilfordCarn v Naomh ColmcilleAll the games will be played on Saturday September 12 and Sunday September 13.CHAMPIONSHIP DRAW: HOLDERS EUNAN’S GET GLENSWILLY IN LAST EIGHT was last modified: August 31st, 2015 by John2Share this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Tags:Aodh RuadhCarndonaghchampionship drawdonegalMalinMilfordN ConaillN MuireNAOMH COLUMBASFCSt EunansSt MichaelsTermonlast_img read more

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South African wins Commonwealth Short Story Prize for Africa

first_img6 May 2016South African writer Faraaz Mahomed has been selected the Africa Regional winner for his short story The Pigeon for the 2016 Commonwealth Short Story Prize.“I am an unseasoned writer, who continues to struggle with the insecurities and anxieties of inexperience,” said Mahomed. “Winning the Commonwealth Prize for the African region is more than an accolade, it’s a prompting to continue down this path.”Based on Johannesburg, Mahomed is a clinical psychologist and human rights researcher. His previous writing has been largely academic, reads the Commonwealth Writers website. Mahomed has published articles in journals relating to issues of human rights.He also has fellowships from the University of the Witwatersrand and the University of Johannesburg; and is a former Fulbright scholar. Mahomed would like to write a novel and obtain a PhD on mental health and human rights.“The Africa region included stories on almost every conceivable theme, accentuating the endless complexity and beauty of the continent; a testament to the inexhaustible talent that abounds there,” said Africa region judge Helon Habila.“The Pigeon is a carefully and patiently woven tale about love, lust, guilt, and escape. It illustrates just how, as humans, we will always come short of our ideals, and we must learn to live with that.”The other winners include:Pacific Regional Winner: Tina Makereti for Black Milk from New ZealandAsia Regional Winner: Parashar Kulkarni for Cow and Company from IndiaCanada and Europe Regional Winner: Stefanie Seddon for Eel from the UKCaribbean Regional Winner: Lance Dowrich for Ethelbert and the Free Cheese from Trinidad and TobagoChair of judges, South African novelist and playwright Gillian Slovo, said the winners were all worthy of their award and they “show how well the short story is flourishing in the Commonwealth”.Read short excerpt from The Pigeon: Each morning, for about four months now, I am woken by the same foul, fat pigeon. I am certain that he’s the same one, even though I have no means to prove it. In truth, I have no way to be sure he is a he either. It used to occur to me that maybe he had left something at the window, or inside and was hoping that being here to retrieve it would allow him some release. On most Saturdays, I leave the window open. It makes me feel kind, because I am easing his spirit into the next phase or something of that nature.The Commonwealth Short Story Prize aims to “bring stories from new and emerging voices, often from countries with little or no publishing infrastructure, to the attention of an international audience”.The five winners selected each win £2 500 (about R53 000) each. The overall winner will be announced at the Calabash International Literary Festival in Jamaica on 5 June, and will walk away with £5 000 (about R106 000) in prize money.The 2016 #CWPrize #regional #winners have been announced!Congratulations to the 5 writers.https://t.co/Er1s2Cuuob pic.twitter.com/g38zsfcAuy— Commonwealth Writers (@cwwriters) May 4, 2016 Source: Commonwealth Writerslast_img read more

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New independent power plant for SA

first_img18 July 2013 South African mining group Exxaro Resources and French independent power producer GDF Suez have signed an agreement to develop a 600-megawatt (MW) coal-fired power plant outside Lephalale in Limpopo province. The proposed site is 17 kilometres northwest of Lephalale in the Waterberg region and adjacent to Exxaro’s Grootegeluk mine. Fuel for the plant will be supplied by Exxaro’s prospective opencast greenfields Thabametsi mine on a surface conveyor belt. “The mine will supply up to 3.8-million tonnes per annum of run-of-mine coal to the power plant post ramp-up,” Exxaro said in a statement on Monday. It is expected that coal will be supplied to the plant for up to 25 years, as coal will continue to form a large part of South Africa’s energy mix. “South Africa urgently requires the installation of additional electricity generation capacity in the near future due to the combination of a low reserve margin and growing electricity demand,” Exxaro said. “GDF Suez and Exxaro are global leaders in their respective industries and are pleased to be able to combine their strengths to positively impact the baseload power generation capacity, with the aim of assisting in alleviating South Africa’s power supply challenges.” The plant’s capacity can be expanded to 1 200MW, depending on water availability and grid integration constraints. “GDF Suez’s partnership with South Africa is gaining momentum, with several agreements successfully concluded during the second quarter of 2013,” said GDF Suez Energy CEO for South Asia, Middle East and Africa Shankar Krishnamoorthy. “Successful public-private partnerships in the power sector will contribute to the adequacy and efficiency of South Africa’s electricity industry, which is key to the country’s economic development.” As a key play in the country’s coal mining sector, Exxaro is integrated in the power and energy production value chain, according to CEO, Sipho Nkosi. “We have taken advantage of the opportunities provided from current regulatory development in South Africa’s mineral and energy sectors to develop a coal mine that can supply new power generating capacity,” Nkosi said. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

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The hope of a second wind

first_imgPam Green of Second Chances believes that true change is possible if everyone plays a part in improving the lives of their fellow citizens. (Images: Second Chances)A complicated break-up left Pam Green destitute, but she managed to overcome adversity with the help of close friends who lent her their support.Following her personal triumph, Green took it upon herself to help other people going through similar struggles who had also been left without a home or a means to provide for themselves.Shortly after making this decision, she founded Second Chances, an initiative aimed at creating social upliftment and embracing ubuntu, the spirit of helping your fellow citizen, through social media.“I have always felt the desire to help,” Green told Independent Online.“In my school days I used to go a couple of times a week and volunteer at orphanages in the afternoons. I started actively initiating projects and getting more involved… It is very important to pay it forward and always remember where you come from.”THE POWER OF SOCIAL MEDIASocial media has fast become a powerful tool for companies and organisations to get their names into the public eye and drive their business.It is no surprise then that Second Chances tapped into this potential to help drive social upliftment and get South African citizens to play an active role in improving the lives of the less fortunate.The organisation makes use of social media to bring pressing issues such as unemployment, poverty and substance abuse to the attention of people who are in a position to help. In this way, it acts as a link between the source of help and where the help is needed.GET INVOLVEDIf you would like to play a part in this online initiative that is changing people’s lives one tweet at a time, visit its get involved page for more details.To see some of the great work Second Chances is doing, visit its Facebook page.“I’m so grateful to those who now follow the work that I do, who support the work that I do and get involved,” Green said.“But most importantly (I am grateful) to the people who trust me enough to get involved in their lives.”Watch Green pay it forward:PLAY YOUR PARTPlay Your Part urges you to share your story. If you or anyone you know has gone out of their way to brighten up the day for someone else, we want to know.If you have a story to tell, be it your own or that of an organisation or initiative dear to you, submit your story or video to our website and tell us how South Africa is playing a part to build a better life for all.last_img read more

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Homeless theatre group takes Shakespeare to the streets

first_imgA group of homeless people living on the streets of Johannesburg have found their true calling in theatre. With the help of a dedicated teacher, the group is taking Shakespeare to the streets, using his words to tell their stories.Acting coach Dorothy Ann Gould and her Johannesburg Awakening Minds students use Shakespeare to find their voices and contribute to society. (Image: Johannesburg Awakening Minds Facebook page)CD AndersonFounded in 2012 by South African actress and acting coach Dorothy Ann Gould, the Johannesburg Awakening Minds (JAM) theatre group comprises homeless men and women living on the inner city streets of Johannesburg.The group began as an acting therapy class in Hillbrow, with the intention, as Gould writes on her website, of “[letting] individuals feel that they had the right to speak, the right to be seen and the right to tell their stories in a city which has been very cruel to them”.Classes include vocal training, theatre stagecraft and creative writing exercises. The students quickly began finding their voices in the works of William Shakespeare, with many of them starting to recite some of the Bard’s most famous soliloquies on street corners as their own performance pieces.In Shakespeare, Gould writes, the actors found that “[the words] of Macbeth and Titus were speaking about their pain and that the plays were huge receptacles that could hold all the emotions that they needed to release: the rage, the feelings of abandonment; they began to flex again their intellectual muscle, to debate, have opinions and to become a team that support each other and watch each other’s backs, not only on the streets, but on stage.”The group has performed on stage intermittently since 2013, including performances at the Johannesburg Arts Alive festival, at the Space.com event at the Johannesburg Theatre and as part of the Shakespeare Society of South Africa festival on radio station Classic FM.With their stage productions few and far between, most of the actors still live on the streets or in shelters, but they have found a continued inspiration in performing for the public on street corners. Some of the actors have moved into other artistic pursuits, such as painting, and selling their works at markets.Donations and sponsorships, as well any small profit from the group’s performances, have helped the JAM members slowly re-enter society, enabling some to open bank accounts, begin hawker businesses and help their families.Some of the rising stars of the JAM group have also found work in short student films and as extras in television productions.JAM member Thando Matodlana has been accepted to study at The Market Theatre Laboratory theatre school, while Sibusiso Magubane has acted in television commercials and is auditioning for speaking roles in local and international films being made in Johannesburg.Gould describes her students as “dedicated and passionate… the talent and growth they have displayed is truly inspirational. Proving that Shakespeare is not for the old, stuffy academic types and has a home in Africa.”For more information, join the Johannesburg Awakening Minds Facebook page for photos and videos of the group in action.To support the initiative, contact Dorothy Ann Gould via her Triple Take Studios website here.Source: BBC, News24, Johannesburg Awakening Minds Facebook PageWould you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See Using Brand South Africa material.last_img read more

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2017 Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour – Day 3

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest Presented by AgXploreSee Day 1 results from the Farm Journal Midwest Crop TourSee Day 2 results from the Farm Journal Midwest Crop TourSee Day 4 results from the Farm Journal Midwest Crop TourFinal results for the entire eastern leg of this year’s Farm Journal Midwest Crop Tour for Illinois.Corn – 180.72 bushels to the acre Soybeans – 1230.77 pods in a 3 x 3 foot square After 6 years on the Midwest Crop Tour today is a first for me. I am on a split route. This is where two scout teams take the same route and cut it into two. Farm Journal had to do that this year because of the overwhelming interest in the tour. I am told things could get really interesting (as if things haven’t been already) through today and tomorrow in Illinois, Iowa and Minnesota. We’ll see!3:10 p.m.Our last stop of the day was in Cedar County, Iowa and we ended the day on a high note. This was most consistent stand we have seen today and the ears have filled out nicely. The corn here is pretty much done and this farmer will be please with a yield of 206. Soybeans could use another shot or two of rain, but this field has developed nicely this season. Our pod count here was 1447 in a 3 foot square.Cedar County, IowaCedar County, Iowa1:46 p.m.Pushed further west into Iowa and we are sampling in Jones County. This part of the state got some of the rains that much of the Midwest received earlier this week, but they also got hail recently. Corn population was decent and ear size was excellent. Yield here coming in at 203 and soybean pods in a 3 x 3 foot square was the lowest of the day at 843.Jones County, IowaJones County, Iowa12:32 p.m.We made it into Iowa, taking the most narrow bridge over the widest river. Just part of the adventure, I guess. The corn we are pulling makes us think we are somewhere else. From the road, it looks like the Hawkeye State but when we pull samples it tells a different story. Yield estimate for this field in Jackson County is 116. Soybeans have been as good as we have seen all day. We haven’t seen anything terrible all day as far as beans go. These were bushy and healthy, but pod counts were good for this 30 inch row field. Pod count for a 3 x 3 foot square was 1304.Jackson County, IowaJackson County, IowaJackson County, Iowa11:34 a.m.The rolling hills around northwest Illinois in Carroll County are really scenic, but the corn isn’t as nice to look at when you pull it out of the field. The numbers were are getting here are nowhere near what these farmers are used to. Tip back was on all of these ears and spacing is not good here. Our yield calc here is 127. Soybeans had more Japanese Beetles in this field than I have seen all week. More 30 inch rows here but the pod count was lower. Our 3 x 3 foot square number was 795.Carroll County, IllnoisCarroll County, IllnoisCarroll County, IllnoisCarroll County, Illnois10:35 a.m.After almost 2 hours of drive time we made it to our first sample spot, in Ogle County, Illinois. The stressful growing season is easy to see in these ears. This was some of the roughest sample of 3 I have seen thus far. Low ear count hurt this field even more. Our yield guess is 110 here. Soybeans were a different story. This field of 30 inch rows was heavily populated and podded. Very healthy green plants with a solid root system and they are through flowering. Our pod count in a 3 x 3 foot square is 1932.Ogle County, IlinoisOgle County, Ilinoislast_img read more

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Kids on The Web: Are They Satisfied With Virtual Worlds and Games?

first_imgWe know that kids under 12 have been born into a world with myriad Internet-connected devices – PCs, mobile phones, video game systems and many more. Because they’re native to this device-laden world, kids understand technology more easily. I got a lesson in this over Christmas, when attempting to set up the Wii I’d just given to my daughter. I was grappling with a stubborn Wii console setting, getting a bit frustrated that it wasn’t doing what I wanted. Suddenly the remote was grabbed from my hands by my 8-year old. She promptly fixed the setting, in one click. 5 Outdoor Activities for Beating Office Burnout Kids are also born multi-taskers and have a “desire for immediacy,” as a recent USA Today article put it.Given all of these skills and an intuitive grasp of technology, I often wonder if kids are really getting the types of web sites and apps that they want. Is there something beyond entertainment from big corporations like Disney, for kids under 12? What’s more, because kids have a lot of technology-fueled creativity, can they help inform innovations for grown-ups?These questions are a big part of why we’re running the survey, which includes asking kids to draw a picture of “what would be really interesting or fun to do on your computer/the Internet that your computer can’t do right now?” So we encourage you to sit down with your child and do the survey. In return we’ll share the results with you on ReadWriteWeb and Life-Connected (Latitude’s blog). Click here to begin the survey.Photo credits: lindsayshaver; makelessnoise 4 Keys to a Kid-Safe App For kids under 12 years of age, entertainment websites and virtual worlds are all the rage. My 8-year old daughter plays ToonTown a lot. Club Penguin and Moshi Monsters are also popular in this demographic. But are these types of sites fulfilling the potential and talent our kids have with technology?In order to help us answer that question, we’re asking those of you who are parents of a child aged 12 or under to do a short survey accompanied by your child. With this survey, co-hosted by Boston research firm Latitude, we’re hoping to discover what kind of web apps kids want but don’t necessarily have right now.Are you the parent of a child 12 years or under? Click here to take a survey about how kids perceive the Web.We’ve previously looked at the most popular websites for kids and it was clear that entertainment sites had the greatest affinity with under 12s. There are strong social networking aspects to those sites and many of the popular ones come from television companies like Nick, Cartoon Network and Disney.Virtual worlds like ToonTown and Club Penguin are particularly popular with kids right now. In a recent New York Times article, University of California cultural anthropologist Mizuko Ito claimed that “children who play these games would see less of a distinction between their online friends and real friends.” She also said that these types of online virtual worlds make kids “more likely to participate actively in their own entertainment” – in comparison to us oldies who grew up watching TV from the couch. Related Posts center_img 9 Books That Make Perfect Gifts for Industry Ex… richard macmanus Tags:#Digital Lifestyle#gaming#Real World#web 12 Unique Gifts for the Hard-to-Shop-for People…last_img read more

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Should the Average Consumer Worry About IoT Privacy?

first_imgFrank Landman The internet of things (IoT) has the power to make our lives more convenient and more connected than ever before, but many critical thinkers have admitted concern about consumer privacy. Consumer groups, corporations, and even governments have spoken out about the dangers of IoT being exploited, but are these truly worthy of the concern and proactive action of consumers?Scale and FuturePart of the problem is due to the sheer scale of connectivity that IoT can provide. A little over a decade ago, most people only connected to the internet with one device—a home desktop or a laptop. Today, most consumers have at least a handful of connected devices, including smartphones, smart TVs, and even upgraded kitchen appliances designed to make life easier. Big families deciding which home appliances to buy, typically need to think about factors like the size of a refrigerator or the number of burners on a stove, but today have the option of also including internet connectivity and other high-tech features. In the next several years, the IoT boom will pump out billions of additional connected devices, and in a decade, if the trend continues, the average home could have dozens of devices within it.If every device has a privacy concern associated with it, or an inherent security vulnerability, the multiplication of owned devices will multiply the total risk that the average family faces. In other words, if IoT devices had the same level of risk that your laptop did back in 2005, and you own dozens of connected devices, you’ll be dozens of times more vulnerable than you were back then.Constant ListeningOne of the biggest concerns from consumer privacy organizations is the fact that your devices could be constantly listening to you. Any device with a microphone, such as your smartphone or smart speaker, could be listening to you even when you aren’t directly engaging it—or even when you think you’ve turned it off. Amazon’s Echo speakers, for example, need to constantly monitor for vocal commands, which means they can “hear” your conversations.Imagine having a conversation with a friend in your kitchen about a sensitive matter, such as speculating about the possibility of divorce. If your smart refrigerator or stove happens to tune in, it could feed that information back to its manufacturer, who could then use that information to advertise specific services to you. It doesn’t take much imagination to think up a problematic scenario, such as a spouse seeing advertisements for a divorce attorney because they use the same Wi-Fi router.Data SharingMost major tech corporations have pledged to use consumer data responsibly, either implicitly, or in their terms of service. However, there’s often little stopping companies from selling your data to another provider, or lending them data in exchange for money. Data is incredibly valuable in today’s society, which means companies are eager to get their hands on it. In the span of a few transactions, your data could end up in the hands of a much less reputable company, or may eventually be accessible to the public.Device InteractionsIoT is constantly growing more sophisticated, in part because every device you own has the potential to connect with other devices. In the near future, smart speakers and other devices that “stitch” together your home networks will become more common, and it won’t be outrageous to think that your toaster, your TV, and your Bluetooth speakers can all talk to each other and share information about your habits.On some level, this will lead to more convenience; your TV viewing habits could generate a list of recommended groceries, or your exercise habits could prompt your thermostat to lower the temperature in the home when you come back from a run. But all those information exchanges can also make you more vulnerable; a malicious user that can access just one of your devices could feasibly gain access to your entire network. A single vulnerability in the chain could lead to its widespread failure.InnocuousnessAnother factor to consider is the perceived innocuousness of many IoT devices. Modern kids are growing up with connected devices as playthings, and many adults wear fitness bands or smartwatches without regularly considering the fact that they have a constantly connected device attached to them. It’s hard to see your “smart microwave” as a tech security hazard.That complacency makes people underestimate the potential privacy and security issues associated with IoT. Just because something seems like it’s no big deal, or seems like it can’t pose a threat, doesn’t mean it’s harmless.Lack of OversightRight now, there’s almost no governmental or regulatory oversight for how IoT should be designed or manufactured. Instead, we leave it to corporations to determine what “responsible IoT” is, and use that information to create their products. That puts consumers in a dangerous situation. There aren’t any requirements for companies to make their devices meet a certain security standard, nor are there any transparency initiatives that force companies to disclose exactly how they gather or use data (though the EU is making a concentrated effort to push for better standards).Governmental authority isn’t necessarily the answer, but a complete lack of third-party oversight is a glaring weakness—and one that complicates all the other weaknesses already associated with IoT.Should You Be Concerned?So should you, the average consumer, be concerned about your loss of privacy, or the security issues inherent in IoT?Consider:What do you have to lose? What would you, personally, have to lose from a loss of personal information? In a worst-case scenario, a vulnerability in a connected device could lead you to lose your important passwords, such as bank account logins. But on a less impactful level, the worst you may have to fear is having your conversations overheard. Based on what we know, the rate of truly damaging hacks will be low—but if you have a lot to lose, or if you greatly value your privacy, you should be more concerned than most.Personal exposure. How much personal exposure are you going to have to these issues? For starters, consider how many connected devices you have and how many you plan to get; obviously, the more smart devices you have in your home, the more vulnerable you’re going to be. Your specific smart devices choices will also come into play; purchasing smart devices from reputable, transparent companies will make you far less vulnerable than buying them from newly emerging startups, or companies with a history of questionable practices. Always do your research before buying, and if you’re especially concerned about IoT privacy, consider limiting your number of connected devices.Personal habits and best practices. You can mitigate many of the shortfalls of IoT by doubling down on good personal habits and best practices. For example, you can make sure you choose strong passwords for all your devices, and change those passwords on a regular basis. You can read the terms and conditions of the devices and services you use, and make sure to encrypt your local Wi-Fi network. You can also customize your device settings to minimize or control which information is sent to external tech companies.Toward a new era. Finally, consider how the state of IoT is going to develop. This is a technology that’s still in its infancy, so it doesn’t make sense to get too upset or too complacent this early on. Keep watch for new developments, such as new governmental regulations and new trends, or new vulnerabilities found in smart devices, and use your knowledge of those developments to inform your decisions.Concerns about IoT privacy and security shouldn’t stop you from buying that latest gadget, nor should it trigger any kind of existential crisis in you—but these are questions and problems worth considering. The ethics of big data and IoT have yet to be fully explored or resolved, so until they are, it’s your responsibility as an informed consumer to understand the products you’re buying, the companies behind them, and how those products could be exploited. Internet of Things Makes it Easier to Steal You… Follow the Puck Related Posts center_img Frank is a freelance journalist who has worked in various editorial capacities for over 10 years. He covers trends in technology as they relate to business. Small Business Cybersecurity Threats and How to… Top 5 Areas Where Companies Want IoT Solutionslast_img read more

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Attention Is Expensive

first_imgThe social tools make it possible for you to get attention. They provide you with everything you need to avoid obscurity. There is no reason that you should be a secret agent, possessing amazing abilities without anyone knowing who you are or how to reach you.The tools are mostly free. Attention, however, is expensive.Time: The first price you pay to gain attention you pay for in time. You have to invest time in the activities that drive attention. Getting attention takes more time than most people think, but it takes less time than any other period in human history. If you don’t have the time to invest, you also won’t have the attention you want.Energy: The second payment you must make is in energy. You have to devote your focus and energy to attention-getting activities. You can’t spend energy browsing the web, living in your inbox, or binge watching Netflix. Attention doesn’t follow passivity. It only follows action.Creativity: The third payment comes in the form of creativity. Attention follows creators, particularly those who create excellent content. The price to create content compelling to the audience whose attention you want is very high. Content creation requires resourcefulness and creativity. Taking pictures with your friends at a conference is fun, and it may get you a little attention, but it isn’t a long-term attention-gaining strategy. For long-term attention, look at Seth Godin.An attention-gaining strategy takes patience. You’re making a payment of time and energy and creativity. It works. Just not right away.A lot of people would like attention for their product or service. A good many people would like attention for their brand, personal or professional. A small number of people want attention for all the wrong reasons.Most people, however, will not invest the time, the energy, or their creativity to get the attention they need. They don’t want to make those investments, and they greatly prefer being comfortable.You can have whatever you want, provided you pay the price in full beforehand. Essential Reading! Get my 2nd book: The Lost Art of Closing “In The Lost Art of Closing, Anthony proves that the final commitment can actually be one of the easiest parts of the sales process—if you’ve set it up properly with other commitments that have to happen long before the close. The key is to lead customers through a series of necessary steps designed to prevent a purchase stall.” Buy Nowlast_img read more

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