Ocean City Community Holy Week Services

first_imgGood Friday services are from noon to 3 p.m. at St. Peter’s United Methodist Church. (Photo courtesy St. Peter’s United Methodist Church) All members of the community are invited to prepare for Easter by attending the annual Good Friday Service from noon to 3 p.m. at St. Peter’s United Methodist Church, Eighth Street and Central Avenue.Area clergy will preach on “The Seven Last Words of Christ.” Music will be presented by St. Peter’s Choir and soloists.The Ocean City Ministerium and Ecumenical Council are sponsors of this service. Worshipers are invited to come and go as their schedule permits or to stay for the entire service.An offering will benefit the Ocean City Ecumenical Council Community Food Cupboard and Clothes Closet.Tonight and Friday, a live drama presentation of “The Living Last Supper” will be at the Ocean City Tabernacle, 550 Wesley Avenue, at 7 p.m. each night.A presentation of “The Living Last Supper” is at 7 p.m. on Thursday and Friday at the Ocean City Tabernacle.The annual Easter Sunrise Service sponsored by the Ocean City Ministerium and Ecumenical Council will be held at the Ocean City Music Pier, Moorlyn Terrace and the Boardwalk, Sunday at 6:30 a.m.The speaker will be Reverend Dr. Larry Oksten, Pastor at United Methodist Church. The glory of Easter music will be performed by musicians and celebrated with trumpets. An offering will benefit the Ocean City Ecumenical Council Community Food Cupboard and Clothes Closet.The experience of witnessing the beauty of the Easter sunrise along with the sights and sounds of the ocean make this an inspiring event. The Easter Service has become a tradition for visitors and year-round residents of the island.Parking is free at the Eighth and Ninth Street lots and other city parking lots.last_img read more

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O.C. Officials Issue Statement on Rowdy Teens

first_imgThe mayor’s office and police department have been working together to address issues related to large groups of young teenagers causing problems in Ocean City, according to a joint statement from Mayor Jay Gillian and Police Chief Jay Prettyman.Towns throughout the state have been dealing with the same concerns.“As always, public safety will be the No. 1 priority for the entire city team,” Gillian said.The city has also received many calls and emails related to an assault involving female juveniles on Saturday, April 17.Many of the calls appear to stem from incomplete and inaccurate accounts of the incident shared on social media.Three suspects were immediately taken into custody, and the case is being handled to the fullest extent allowed within the law.The public should be aware that a new Attorney General’s directive on Juvenile Justice Reform limits the enforcement actions that may be taken in these situations.The mayor has spoken with the victim’s mother and will continue to be in touch with the family.The city also is aware of large groups riding bicycles in reckless, dangerous and threatening fashion.To address this activity, the OCPD will:Deploy seasonal officers who recently graduated from the Cape May County Police Academy.Increase the presence of officers assigned throughout town.Issue summonses for reckless and threatening bicycle riding.Use a city ordinance to hold parents and guardians accountable for lack of supervision and control over juvenile children.Use unmarked cars to take video of illegal behaviors with officers ready to issue summonses.Use public and private camera systems citywide to identify and verify illegal behavior.The department urges the community to help in this effort by reporting illegal behavior as it happens. Enforcement is always easier if reports are timely. Call the non-emergency number at 609-399-9111. For all emergencies, call 9-1-1. City officials and police are cracking down on large gatherings of unruly teens. last_img read more

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Class studies homelessness

first_imgFor many Notre Dame students, the concept of homelessness in America may only represent a social problem far removed from their lives, but senior Emily Salvaterra said she confronts the reality of the issue on a weekly basis. As students in Professor Benedict Giamo’s American Studies course, titled “Confronting Homelessness in the U.S.,” Salvaterra and her peers commit at least three hours per week to volunteering at the Center for the Homeless in South Bend. “The whole idea of this class is to bring a national social issue into a local perspective,” Salvaterra said. “The experiential learning component is really important to understanding homelessness, and you don’t get the chance to do things like this in every class.” The course, which Giamo has taught since his arrival at Notre Dame in 1990, examines the conditions of extreme poverty and homelessness within the context of American culture and society. It studies the issue from historical, sociological and economic perspectives. However, Giamo said the experiential learning aspect of the course is crucial to students’ grasp of homelessness as a real issue. “I think it’s very important for students to account for homelessness as an academic area and as a real, living presence in contemporary society,” Giamo said. “Homelessness is still very much a social problem, and it has not been ameliorated.” Students sharpen their skills in integrating theory and practice by writing journal entries about each volunteer experience at the Center for the Homeless. They take on various service roles in their work at the Center, including tutoring, overseeing children’s activities, working at the front desk or in the kitchen and participating in after-school programs for children. In general, Giamo said he encourages his students to interact with homelessness as much as possible. “I want students to encounter and put a face on homelessness,” Giamo said. “The more students interact with the homeless, the more they will be able to understand individual stories of homelessness.” Salvaterra said she brought her previous experience as a summer intern at the Center for the Homeless into her academic and practical understanding of the issue during the course. “I’ve always been interested in issues of homelessness, so I went out of my way to take the class because I wanted to connect my academic pursuits with volunteering,” Salvaterra said. “Literally confronting homelessness at the shelter causes you to confront your own biases and learn about people in ways that you can’t in a regular class.” Academically, the course covers the issue of homelessness from the late 19th-century to the present day, highlighting the social and economic changes that contributed to shifts in patterns of homelessness in the U.S., Giamo said. He said he wanted to give his students a sense of the history of homelessness by studying the issue from its initial identification as a social problem. For this reason, the first half of the course focuses on poverty and homelessness in New York City and other urban areas from the turn of the century to the 1970s. “The social and economic forces of the Civil War helped create conditions of urban poverty after the war,” Giamo said. “At the end of the century, social investigators encountered the poor and homeless in slums and tenements, and they wrote about it for a middle-class American audience.” Giamo said he covers homelessness from 1980 to the present in the second half of the course. According to Giamo, the importance and effectiveness of the experiential learning aspect of the course comes through in students’ documentary accounts of their experiences, which “forces them to integrate the objective, ethnographic dimension of the experience with the subjective dimension — their own feelings and impressions about homelessness.” Giamo said students who have experience with the issue from their time studying abroad in London and Dublin now have intercultural ideas about homelessness. “It’s interesting because homelessness is a global problem in advanced industrial countries,” Giamo said. “Local microanalysis is at the center of this course, but we are aware that homelessness is a national and global phenomenon.”last_img read more

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Pack Back-to-School Lunches Safely

first_imgSwanson said it’s vital to keep any protein-rich food like beans, eggs and meats –processed or leftover muscle cuts such as roast beef or chicken — cold with chill packs.”Mayonnaise or margarine spreads, as long as they’re commercially prepared, aresafe to use in sandwiches,” she said. “They keep the bread moist and keep itfrom becoming soggy from the sandwich filling.”Parents can cut the fat content in their child’s lunch with a low- or reduced-fat mayonnaise, salad spread ormargarine.A good rule of thumb for lunch foods is if you buy it from a refrigerated case or itcame from the refrigerator at home, keep it cold.Hot foods require another type of container: a vacuum bottle. Swanson said a goodvacuum bottle will keep hot foods safe for four to six hours. Fill the bottle with boilingwater for two minutes, then empty it and immediately fill it with the food that has beenheated to boiling.”But you have to make sure your child can easily handle the bottle to empty itinto a bowl or plate without spilling the hot food onto themselves or others,” shesaid. “Hot foods may present more of a burn risk than a food safety risk.” Other safety factors to watch include pull-tops on food containers that may cutchildren’sfingers.Good lunches help your children get through their day and stay healthy. But lunch withfood safety risks can ruin their day and yours. While you’reincluding notebooks, pencils and backpacks on your list of supplies for school, don’t forget one of the mostimportant — a safe lunch box and cold source.”There are a lot of differences between a safe lunch box and one that will justcarry the lunch,” said Ruthann Swanson, a food specialist with the University ofGeorgia Extension Service. “Some boxes or bags don’t have enough insulation to keep foods safe,” Swanson said.”And even of those, some are too small to carry enough food to get a child through along school day.”Swanson is researching the types of lunch boxes that best keep foods out of the”danger zone” — between 40 and 140 degrees.”When perishable foods stay in the danger zone for two hours or more, their safetybecomes questionable,” she said.Insulated lunch boxes and bags with reusable cold packs are the best way to keep coldfoods below 40 degrees. Nontoxic chemical packs can keep foods cold without the mess orbother of ice.Swanson said the hard plastic cold packs stay colder than soft-bag packs. And they’reless likely to break or get punctured.”Many parents freeze drink boxes to keep sandwiches or other foods cold. And thatis another option,” she said. “But then you have to be sure it thaws enough foryour child to have a drink at lunchtime.”Boxed drinks can leak, though. Freezing makes the liquid expand and that may tear thebox seams. One option for a lunchtime drink is UHT milk your child can safely drink atroom temperature. Swanson said most children like cold drinks, though, so freezing orchilling makes them more appealing.Using a cold source gives parents and kids more variety for lunch, too. If your onlychoices are room-temperature foods, you don’t have a lot of choices.”But one food that does stay safe and is nutritious is peanut butter,”Swanson said.Many children will eat peanut butter on apples, bananas, crackers, celery or insandwiches.But what about sandwiches with meats or salad-type fillings?last_img read more

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