$32,000 raised at Heart Walk

first_img Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration “This was one of the largest crowds in recent years and I think everyone enjoyed the new venue,” Mitchell said. “Having the Heart Walk at the Troy Sportsplex provided us with a walking track and this was the first time that we’ve been able to have an ‘organized’ walk.”Mitchell said the competition for the prizes for the most laps walked was friendly but competitive.“We had a few people who were almost running trying to get in one more lap before time was up,” she said. “Everyone had an opportunity to win a prize no matter how many or how few laps they walked.”Mitchell said the 2013 Pike County Heart Walk is now one for the books but already thoughts are turning toward 2014. By Jaine Treadwell Latest Stories Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson $32,000 raised at Heart Walk Print Article Skip Email the author Book Nook to reopen The 2013 Pike County Heart Walk annual fundraiser in support of the American Heart Association Tuesday night was a great success from fundraising to fun raising.Elizabeth Mitchell, Pike County Heart Association board chair, said that the campaign raised more than $32,000 in the fight against heart disease, which is the number one killer of Americans.“That’s not the exact total because we still some more money to come in,” Mitchell said. “We are very pleased with the funds raised and want to thank the people of Pike County for their generosity and support of the American Heart Association. We also want to thank the many who volunteered their time and talents to make the Pike County Heart Walk campaign a success.”Mitchell said the Heart Walk at the Troy Sportsplex attracted a large crowd of all ages.center_img By The Penny Hoarder “The Pike County Heart Association will kick off the 2014 Heart Walk campaign in late August or September,” Mitchell said. “Our board always welcomes new members so we encourage anyone who would like to join to contact us,”“We are still accepting donations for this year’s campaign. Anyone who would like to make a donation may do so by contacting Traci Davis at Troy Bank and Trust.” Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Sponsored Content You Might Like Ala. lawmakers not sure gas tax is a good idea By Gabrielle Pack, Troy University journalism student Pike County’s progression into repairing and maintaining county roads and bridges is at… read more Published 6:12 pm Wednesday, February 20, 2013 Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies Are… Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthBet You’re Pretty Curious About Jaden’s Net Worth Right About Now, HuhBradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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It’s Alive!! Weird “Blob” Debuts at Paris Zoo

first_imgIt looks like a fungus but acts like an animal, and that it has no mouth or stomach but can detect food and digest it.The Blob can also move without legs, and if you cut it in half it will heal itself in two minutes.It also has no brain and yet it can learn.The director of the Paris Zoological Park says if you merge two blobs together, one will transmit its knowledge to the other. “We know for sure it is not a plant but we don’t really if it’s an animal or a fungus,” said David.“It behaves very surprisingly for something that looks like a mushroom (…) it has the behavior of an animal, it is able to learn.” (Paris) — Slime mold is part of a new exhibit at a Paris zoo.The moving slime mold contains more than 900 species and can heal itself within minutes, yet is does not have any neurons.The yellowish mold has been called “The Blob” because of its characteristics. This newest exhibit of the Paris Zoological Park, which goes on display to the public on Saturday, has no mouth, no stomach, no eyes, yet it can detect food and digest it.The blob also has almost 720 sexes, can move without legs or wings and heals itself in two minutes if cut in half.“The blob is a living being which belongs to one of nature’s mysteries”, said Bruno David, director of the Paris Museum of Natural History, of which the Zoological Park is part. A Paris zoo has unveiled a mysterious new organism which they call a ‘blob.’ The yellowish unicellular living being looks like a fungus but acts like an animal https://t.co/ukj0mgqf9a pic.twitter.com/DVaR3RdqXZ— Reuters Top News (@Reuters) October 17, 2019last_img read more

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6th Syracuse football player to leave program this offseason

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ Cross redshirted his freshman season and didn’t get any playing time in his redshirt freshman year. A slew of defensive lineman were ahead of Cross on the depth chart, including Steven Clark, Kayton Samuels and McKinley Williams. Chris Slayton filled in at defensive end but started the year as a defensive tackle, too.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textAfter Syracuse’s last major coaching transition, when Doug Marrone was hired to replace Greg Robinson, 28 players left the program. Comments Published on December 15, 2016 at 7:32 pm Contact Chris: [email protected] | @ChrisLibonaticenter_img A sixth Syracuse player will transfer from the program. Syracuse defensive tackle Tyler Cross announced his plans to transfer via Twitter on Thursday. Cross joins running back Jordan Fredericks, cornerback Corey Winfield, wide receiver Kenterius Womack, defensive tackle Anthony Giudice and tight end Trey Dunkelberger.last_img read more

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Schafer: On senior day, keep those shoulder pads on as long as possible

first_img Published on November 26, 2019 at 6:09 pm Two days after Thanksgiving, Syracuse and Wake Forest will strap up for a seemingly meaningless football game. At 4-7, Syracuse is all but eliminated from bowl contention. For 8-3 Wake Forest, any outcome still results in a bowl game appearance but not a spot in the conference championship. The game’s final score is in many ways irrelevant, but that doesn’t mean the game, and the moments before and after, will be. At least not for Syracuse’s seniors. After losing to Louisville last weekend, the Orange need a miracle, including several teams denying bowl bids, to extend their season to December. That means for 22 seniors, Saturday could be their last time playing competitive football. In an otherwise lost season, one that was expected to be so much more, the potential final curtain call of their football careers provides significance to an otherwise inconsequential Saturday. Sure, there’s always the NFL, but only 14 former Orange players have been drafted since 2010. Maybe there’s the Canadian Football League or arena football. Perhaps random spring leagues will continue to pop up. Regardless, those games won’t be the same. Just ask Dino Babers. His last football memory remains a few plays on a bum knee at the end of a Canadian preseason game, which culminated in him being cut without compensation.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSo now Babers is forced to coach instead of play. Football isn’t like most sports. There’s no emulating an 11-on-11 scrap with helmets and shoulder pads. No beer league softball or Sunday morning pickup basketball runs. When football careers end, they end for good. “I love football too much,” senior Kenneth Ruff said about continuing to play somewhere. “I don’t want to let it go.”Max Freund | Staff PhotographerThe truth is, I never wanted to let football go either. I grew up on the field, performed well enough to play low-end college but chose Syracuse and journalism instead. Over the past month, as this Syracuse season solidified itself as a disappointment, it reminded me of my last season of football. We finished 5-6, Mansfield High School’s worst finish since at least the turn of the century. I’ll never forget the tears that rolled down my face after a blown lead on Thanksgiving Day officially made it a losing season. I wasn’t just losing a football game that day, I was losing a passion I’d been committed to longer than anything else in my life.The emotions poured out to match my grandfather’s. He’d been there before too. Football was ending and a shaking hug from Grampy was keeping it alive for just a few moments longer. I wanted that final postgame embrace on the football field to last forever. The bus ride home wasn’t long enough either. Nor were the parting words from Coach Redding. Throughout all of it, the shoulder pads stayed on. When they came off, it’d all be over. I wasn’t ready for that, not yet. So now I’m writing, hoping to see the athlete I can never be again, and truly never was, in the players I’m covering. They say they want to stick with the sport too, perhaps coach or find a way to keep playing. The games taught them too much to give it up and they’re not sure what they’d do with the free time. Right now they’re busy, caught up in the beautiful monotony of meetings and practice. When it’s over, that all goes away and there’s no way to get it back. Evan Adams started playing around the time his dad died during grade school. He was angry back then, he said, and football taught him restraint. The sport showed him there’s a time and place to release his emotions.   Personal beefs across the line of scrimmage can’t interfere with the team goal. There are too many members on a football team to only worry about yourself. That’s no different in an office or a newsroom.“The same way I play football is the same way I go about things in life,” Adams said. Max Freund | Staff PhotographerI asked Lakiem Williams what he’d remember most when it’s all over. He said it was the bond he built with fellow senior linebacker Andrew Armstrong. They supported each other during Syracuse’s Friday summer conditioning runs that were so hard they wouldn’t want to move for the rest of the weekend. I had my own Armstrong, his name was Matt Kashtan. My best friend from a few streets over kept me steady during our “Fun Friday” runs too. He’s the teary-eyed brother I sat with in the locker room on Thanksgiving, delaying our family dinners, unsure why we had to take the pads off. I didn’t have the heart to tell Lakiem it’s not the same when it’s just you and your headphones lifting weights at the rec center. On the Saturday after Thanksgiving at 12:30 p.m., have a last look at Adams, belly hanging and trash-talk slinging, before he attempts to fold a defender in half. Watch Williams, perhaps the most frequently smiling football player I’ve ever met, chase down a running back in the backfield. See Moe Neal, a staple in the Syracuse offense for four years, search for a final touchdown in the Carrier Dome. Enjoy the seniors, all 22 of them, as they finish their final Saturday of football certainty with a crew they’ve been together with for the majority of college, a time period many recall as the fondest of their lives. Lost seasons will exist in the history books forever. But it’s the things that happen within them that are truly memorable. As the seniors stroll the Carrier Dome field one last time during the senior walk after the game, none of the results will matter. It’s just a final moment to take it all in. A final moment, to keep those pads on their shoulders just a little bit longer. Because once the pads come off, they’ll never come back on, no matter how much we wish they could. Josh Schafer is a senior staff writer for The Daily Orange where his column appears occasionally. He can be reached at [email protected] or on Twitter @Schafer_44 Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

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