What U.S.-China trade relations reveal

first_imgMuch has been revealed about the world’s two largest economies in the fallout from the tariffs imposed by the U.S. government on goods from China —  and that country’s response.When the Trump administration announced on May 10 that it was imposing a new 25 percent tariff on $200 billion worth of goods imported from China, nothing dramatic happened in the stock markets of the two countries. The Shanghai composite stock index fell only slightly and is still up by 15 percent for the year.Trump then tweeted a warning: “China should not retaliate — will only get worse!”His imperialist arrogance had no effect. In less than two hours, China did retaliate, but carefully. It announced it would put tariffs ranging up to 25 percent on $60 billion worth of U.S. goods.That was later on the same day, May 10. In reaction to this news, the U.S. stock market then plunged 617 points on Monday, May 13 — the biggest drop so far in 2019.So which economy is more fragile and unstable? That of the wealthy imperialist U.S. or that of People’s China?Why did talks break down?The move by Washington to impose new tariffs on Chinese goods came after a breakdown in trade talks. According to the New York Times: “The United States and China were nearing a trade deal that would lift tariffs, open the Chinese market to American companies and strengthen China’s intellectual property protections. But discussions fell apart last weekend, when China called for substantial changes to the negotiating text that both countries had been using as a blueprint for a sweeping trade pact. American officials said that China claimed that provisions of the deal would be in violation of Chinese laws — which could not be easily changed — and that the United States was demanding too much and giving too little.” (May 10)If this interpretation is correct, it shows several things:The inroads of the capitalist market in China have produced a class of trade negotiators who were willing to make significant concessions to the U.S. in order to promote Chinese businesses.The U.S. was pushing for changes to China’s laws that would weaken the role of the state in ownership and control of the economy.When leaders of the government and the Communist Party reviewed these concessions, they saw them as incompatible with China’s socialist roots and an attack on its state-owned industries and financial institutions. They pulled the agreement back.China’s socialist rootsChina is the fastest-growing large economy in the world, set to surpass the U.S. in a few years. It has developed from a time of wrenching poverty for the great mass of its people to prosperity for the majority in the span of just two generations. Indeed, China plans to have completely eliminated poverty by 2020 — next year! The basic elements of its economy since its revolution in 1949 have been state-owned and integrated into a broad plan for social development. However, after a great internal struggle, the ruling Communist Party decided in the late 1970s to allow capitalist ownership and investment in order to stimulate economic growth.The results have been mixed and contradictory, with great successes and great dangers. A class of billionaires now exists in China. Their appetite for luxury and excess have a corroding influence on socialist solidarity and egalitarianism. At the same time, the spectacular growth of China’s economy has lifted 800 million people out of great poverty — accounting for fully 70 percent of the world’s progress in this period.Those who put China’s tremendous achievements down solely to the capitalist market — and thereby discount its great socialist revolution against both world imperialism and the internal parasitic classes of landlords and compradore capitalists — should ask themselves this: Why then is China so different from India or Indonesia or Brazil?Why have the lives of Chinese workers and peasants improved so greatly, while those in truly capitalist countries are mired in poverty?China — and U.S. workers — push backThe U.S. imperialist ruling class is not used to being resisted by the leaders of a developing country. Their mighty military arsenal and strong industrial development have put this U.S. class of predators on top of the world for several generations.But the times are changing. Not only has People’s China been on the rise, but conditions for workers in the U.S. have deteriorated, leading to increased class struggle at home. The U.S. government has accumulated enormous debt after years of giveaways to the corporations and banks, plus the great cost of maintaining U.S. military forces on bases around the world. The U.S. uses many of these bases to actively engage in shoring up repressive regimes that otherwise would have been overthrown by the people long ago. Debt is weighing down on the U.S. economy, even as changing technology is erasing workers’ jobs and corporations vie with each other to reduce costs at the expense of wages.To sum up, the U.S. has seen the capitalist part of China’s economy as a Trojan horse that could eventually lead to the breakup of its socialist system. It has been pushing China to change not only the laws regarding trade but the basic relationship between the state and state-owned industry.If what is being reported is true, it would indicate that the prevailing view in China’s Party leadership is that its trade negotiators were giving in too much to pressure from U.S. imperialists.This is good news for China’s future development as a socialist country.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Planning for a healthy retirement

first_imgPlanning for a healthy retirementOn 1 Dec 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. The government has extended its pilot scheme offering health checks topeople finishing workThree pilot schemes were launched by the Department of Health in Marchoffering people aged 50 to 65 advice on issues such as blood pressure, fuel andheating, fitness levels, diet, immunisation and screening programmes. Health minister Lord Hunt unveiled a further five pilot schemes in October,with £800,000 to fund the pilots for a year. The pilots will be examiningdifferent ways of targeting people approaching, or just past, retirement age. The five new pilot sites are in Dorset, East Devon, North Staffordshire andSouthwark and Hackney in London. Services will include an osteoporosis health check in Dorset and anoccupational health and lifestyle advice service through the primary care trustin east Devon. In Southwark, a pre-retirement health day and website with inter-activee-mail will be developed, while in Hackney GP surgeries, employers andcommunity groups will be asked to carry out health checks. In North Staffordshire, the pilot will look to raise awareness of the needfor health checks among older people as well as recruiting them as lay healthadvisers. Lord Hunt said, “We are moving away from the idea that the healthservice for older people is just about treatment towards ensuring that peoplehave advice and help to prevent them from becoming ill in the first place. “These health checks will give older people the chance to stay fitterand healthier for longer and plan for a healthy retirement.” A study by the Health Development Agency for the DoH showed manypre-retirement courses included some aspect of health, but there was potentialfor expanding them. It also found only a few specific pre-retirement health initiatives werebeing developed and that people approaching retirement are rarely targeted byexisting health activities. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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10 top tips to develop young leaders

first_imgOn oversized Post-It Notes in board rooms all over the country you’ll often see something about the need to develop young leaders.But as the old Scottish proverb goes,If wishes were horses, beggars would ride.In other words, it’s going to take more than hoping and wishing that our respective organizations’ young leaders develop into great leaders. Something — a lot of things, really — have to happen in order for young leaders to realize their potential.What are some of those things, and how can we as organizations and leaders do our part to develop young leaders? continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img

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UW treks to East Lansing

first_imgDEREK MONTGOMERY/Herald photoAfter losing a pair of heartbreaking matches in overtime last week, the Wisconsin women’s soccer team will have a chance to redeem itself this weekend. The Badgers (5-5-2) will travel to Michigan Friday to compete against Michigan State (6-3-3) and the University of Michigan (5-4-2).”It’s going to be a big weekend for us,” assistant coach Nick Carlin-Voigt said. “We are looking to get right back into the race in the Big Ten. We play Michigan State first then Michigan, so our approach right now is to take one game at a time. We have had some bad bounces, some things not go our way, but the team started off 0-3-1 last year, and there is no reason we can’t have the same success as last year.”After 12 games, Wisconsin has been plagued by overtime losses, going 1-4-2 in extended play and losing its last three games in extra time. Giving up corner kicks and losing momentum in the second half are two factors that Carlin-Voigt said have helped send the Badgers into overtime. Since last weekend’s double loss, the Badgers have been trying to improve on corner kick scenarios and goal-scoring opportunities.”We have been working on defending corner kicks better,” Carlin-Voigt said. “I think that we are going to have to learn to get the ball out when it is served in the box. I think being smarter in the back third and taking an initiative to clear the ball out will also help us.”This weekend will be the perfect opportunity for the Badgers to pick up momentum. UW will first face Michigan State Friday night. This season, the Spartans have just one more win than the Badgers.Michigan State has won just two contests in 21 tries against Wisconsin. Also, UW has never lost an away match to the Spartans.Defender Kelly Hannon leads Michigan State. The former Big Ten defensive player of the week should offer UW offensive forwards Amy Vermeulen, Allison Priess and Kara Kabellis quite a challenge.With Hannon controlling the backfield, Carlin-Voigt expects the front line to be more physical and explosive against the Spartans.”I think we will play a little more of an attacking style this weekend to try and get some goals,” Carlin-Voigt explained. “It’s going to be a matter of us defending. Last year, we played Michigan State and it was a must-win game, which we won 1-0, so it’s going to be important that we shut them out and finish our chances when they are given to us.”So far this season, the Badgers have used a duo of great goalkeepers in Lynn Murray and Stefani Szczechowski, who have both shown great prominence and are expected to see a lot of action this weekend.”We are really lucky to have two great goalkeepers that the team has confidence in,” Carlin-Voigt said. “So, whoever gets the call will be ready. Stef played well last weekend and Lynn is a very capable goalkeeper. So, it’s a tough decision but we are confident in whoever we decide to put between the pipes.”The Badgers will end their weekend road trip Sunday against Michigan. The Wolverines, like UW, are coming off two losses last weekend, to Purdue and Indiana.Sophomore Melissa Dobbyn leads the Wolverines. The forward has proved to be a lethal threat against Big Ten schools, scoring two goals and putting six shots on goal against Ohio State.If the Badgers can find a way to control Dobbyn, Carlin-Voigt thinks the team might be able to return home with two wins.”The team is really unified right now and they know it’s just a matter of time before we start to see more victories,” he said.last_img read more

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