Schlossnagle looks to Gary Patterson for inspiration with TCU facing elimination

first_imgGarrett is a Journalism and Sports Broadcasting double major. He is the Managing Editor for TCU360, and his passions are God, family, friends, sports, and great food. Boschini talks: construction, parking, tuition, enrollment, DEI, a student trustee Linkedin Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ TCU head coach Jim Schlossnage perches on the top step of the TCU dugout deep in thought during the Horned Frog’s 4-1 victory over Texas A&M. (Photo courtesy of GoFrogs.com) World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ Facebook ReddIt Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/ First pitch between TCU and Louisville is at 7 p.m. Thursday at TD Ameritrade Park in Omaha, Nebraska. Boschini: ‘None of the talk matters because Jamie Dixon is staying’ Whoever Schlossnagle decides not to choose for Thursday’s game would be the starter of Friday’s game if TCU manages to defeat Louisville. In the meantime, he isn’t worried about pouting from either pitcher.“The beauty of it is they’re both chomping at the bit to start, but they’re all about the team, so they’ll be fine with whatever happens,” Schlossnagle said. “Easiest way to do it is to win one more that way they’ll both get a start.”As for the bullpen, Schlossnagle said, “everybody who threw in the first game” should be available, except starting pitcher Jared Janczak, who wouldn’t pitch again this season unless TCU can continue its season into Saturday.Horned Frog lineup looking for more production from the top While the Horned Frog’s bottom half of the batting order powered the team past Texas A&M Tuesday, TCU head coach Jim Schlossnagle knows it’ll need its premier players to be at their best to continue their season past its elimination game against Louisville Thursday.Hitters five through nine in the TCU batting order totaled six hits, one strikeout and three RBI’s against the Aggies Tuesday. Hitters one through four combined for only one hit, seven strikeouts and one RBI.“That’s the beauty of our team: our batting averages aren’t great, they’re not bad, but not great, so on any given days one of those guys could take off,” Schlossnagle said. “We’ve said since the beginning of the year if you had to flip our lineup upside down I’d be okay with it at least to start the season. Right now, maybe not, but they’re all so talented that any one of them can change the game with one swing, and thank goodness they did, which is why we’re still here.”While Schlossnagle said not everyone will be hitting well at the same time, the team needs more from its leadoff hitter, right fielder Austen Wade. Wade is 3-26 in the NCAA Tournament, drawing seven walks.“They’re making good pitches to him, and he’s pressing a little bit, so I might have a little talk with him today,” Schlossnagle said of Wade. “He’s still getting on base enough, but obviously for us to win against the two teams left in our bracket, we’re going to have to him at his best.”If the Horned Frogs want their dreams of bringing home a national championship to be realized, they’ll also need a little bit more from Skoug, who is 7-26 with 15 strikeouts in the NCAA Tournament. However, all seven of Skoug’s hits have been for extra bases: three doubles and four home runs.There’s also been an added challenge for Skoug in Omaha: the shift.When Skoug came up to bat Sunday with no one on base, Florida moved its third baseman to where the shortstop usually stands in between third and second base, its shortstop moved to where the second baseman would normally stand in between second and first, and its second baseman stood in shallow right field. When Skoug stepped up to the plate Tuesday against Texas A&M with runners on base, the Aggies also moved their second base man into right field, but its third baseman stood slightly closer to third base because of the potential for a runner to move to third.Teams align their infield this way against the All-American catcher because the scouting report reads that the majority of the left-handed hitting Skoug’s hits are pulled toward right field, the natural power area for lefties.“It’s happened to him before,” Schlossnagle said of Skoug facing shifts. “He goes in stretches where he gets pull-happy, and then he comes out of it and shoots balls to left field or over the fence to left field, which is just baseball, the ups, and downs of the season.” Twitter Linkedin ReddIt Twitter printWith a quarter of the 2017 College World Series field sent home, TCU head coach Jim Schlossnagle looked to truism TCU head football coach Gary Patterson reiterates in the fall: “All we have to do is win by one.”Schlossnagle is left looking for inspiration with his team needing to win three more elimination games to advance to the College World Series finals.“I think as a coach you’re always looking for the positive, trying to come with the right thing to say to the guys, but you can’t get ahead of your self because the competition is so good,” Schlossnagle said. “It’s coachy. All hands on deck. One day at a time. To try to stick around here a little longer.”Schlossnagle needs not to look no further than the 2016 College World Series for a blueprint his team could replicate. After both the Horned Frogs and Oklahoma State won their first two games in Omaha, both eventual national champion Coastal Carolina and national runner-up Arizona climbed out of the loser’s bracket to reach the last round of the NCAA Tournament.But first, TCU needs to get past the Louisville Cardinals Thursday, who have their own version of a Luken Baker in Brendan McKay. The Cardinal first baseman and left-handed pitcher won the 2017 Dick Howser Trophy, given to the best college baseball player in the country, and was selected No. 4 overall by the Tampa Bay Rays in the 2017 MLB Draft.“They’re an elite team, and I honestly think they’re the most physically talented team here from pitching to defense, athleticism, power, and that speed,” Schlossnagle said.If TCU can defeat the Cardinals, Florida remains in the national semifinals.“Florida is very elite on the mound, so it’s Division I baseball at the absolute highest level, and we’re one of those teams too, still standing,” Schlossnagle said.Lodolo or Traver: Schlossnagle undecided on who will pitch against LouisvilleStarting pitching, more often than not, is what determines who wins and loses in the College World Series with the difference between the remaining teams so razor thin.Up next to decide that will be either redshirt senior and right-hander Mitchell Traver or freshman southpaw Nick Lodolo.“It’s a decision between Nick and Mitchell, and I don’t know if there is a right or wrong answer for that,” Schlossnagle said. “In my mind, it’s always about winning the tournament and seeing what the best matchup is as we move forward.”When looking at the Louisville Cardinals’ lineup, it would seem that Lodolo would be better suited to take the mound.“They have a couple more left-handed hitters than Florida, who has a lot of righties, and they both run a lot so if I had to pick to stay left-handed, it would obviously be Nick,” Schlossnagle said. “Traver does a really good job with limiting the run game.”Louisville head coach Dan McDonnell believes Lodolo will be the TCU pitcher to square off against his team.“I’m assuming we’re facing the highest draft pick that went to college last year, and it’s a great opportunity,” McDonnell said in reference to Lodolo being selected 41st overall by the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 2016 MLB draft but choosing instead to come to TCU.Schlossnagle maintained that it’ll ultimately be himself making the final decision, taking McDonnell’s prediction in jest.“I’ll tell you what if Dan can pick my pitcher, I’ll go ahead and pick theirs,” Schlossnagle said. Men’s basketball scores season-low in NIT semifinals loss to Texas Facebook The College of Science and Engineering Dean, Phil Hartman, retires after 40 consecutive years Listen: The Podell and Pickell Show with L.J. Collier Garrett Podell TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history Previous articleBane falls short of making Under-19 Team USA World Cup TeamNext articleTCU to start Lodolo on the mound in CWS elimination game Garrett Podell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR + posts Garrett Podellhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/garrett-podell/last_img read more

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Ecuador Sets the Regional Pace in Counter Narcotics River Operations

first_imgBy Dialogo September 12, 2012 The Napo River winds eastbound across the Ecuadorean landscape, from the Central Andes to the Port of Francisco de Orellana, in El Coca, where it joins the Coca River as a major artery to the Amazon River in neighboring Peru. In 1541, Gonzalo Pizarro led an expedition of Spanish conquerors through its waters in search of gold, but found the imposing Amazon Rain Forest instead. Known as Jatunyacu in the region’s Quichua language, it means “Big River”, for a reason: It represents a major life source for the many indigenous cultures that inhabit the area, as well as serves as a major transportation and trade route that extends across the South American continent. Some 50 to 80 kilometers north of its waters, the San Miguel and Putumayo Rivers, which also feed into the Amazon, flow parallel to the Napo, but these two delineate part of the 728-kilometer border between Colombia and Ecuador in a porous area that formerly had little state presence or control. In 2000, in fact, there were less than 2,000 Ecuadorean Military troops operating along the country’s northern region under many commands, according to data gathered by the U.S. Military Group Army Mission in Ecuador. It was a territory where coca plantations thrived and armed camps belonging to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) existed with relative impunity. Its strategic equatorial location by the Pacific Ocean on the west and wedging into two important cocaine producers on the rest of its circumference has made it an attractive transit country for drug traffickers and the myriad illegal activities that derive from this scourge, including transnational organized crime, drug trafficking, environmental damage, and human rights violations. Today, however, that grim picture has changed to much brighter colors. The Ecuadorean Military has strengthened its presence in the area, thanks to an investment of US $3 billion in infrastructure, equipment vehicles, boats, and sustainment of troops in the area by the country’s government. It has since established a force of 11,000 personnel to operate along the northern border, all under the single direction of the Northern Operations Command No. 1 (OPCMD 1N), said U.S. Army Chief Warrant Officer 4 Ricardo Marquez, riverine program manager and watercraft engineer with the U.S. Army Mission in El Coca. During Diálogo’s visit to the 19th “Napo” Jungle Brigade based in El Coca, in August 2012, Brigadier General Celso Andrade, commander of the IV “Amazonas” Division of the Ecuadorean Army (IV-DIV), explained that the Ecuadorean Armed Forces reestablished their focus from the eastern and southern borders with Peru to the northern border with Colombia in 2005. “Our border is definitely porous. Colombian citizens living in the border areas [and linked to the FARC] cross the boundaries to set up support networks for the FARC’s logistics systems,” he said. With the added support to the area, they work closely with their Colombian counterparts to control the effects that sharing a permeable boundary can cause. In addition, an inset of support in the form of $100 million from the United States in the last twelve years has also helped the country’s Armed Forces reinforce and expand control of their sovereignty and national security along the northern border, as well as fight drug trafficking with a tougher hand. Specifically, the United States has backed the Ecuadorean Armed Forces Riverine Program, through a total package approach destined to the purchase of individual equipment, tactical vehicles, riverine tactical boats, infrastructure projects, logistics, operations, maintenance, and riverine and tactical training. The Counter Narcotics Riverine Program is run by the Ecuadorean Armed Forces Counter Narcotics Program and executed by the U.S. Military Group in Ecuador through support of the U.S. Southern Command in Miami, Florida. As part of the program, there are 52 boats (as well as all their related maintenance, upgrades, supplies services and training courses) stationed along different locations of the northern border – including the “Amazonas” IV-DIV in El Coca, the 55th Jungle Detachment in Putumayo, the 53rd Special Forces Group in Lago Agrio, the 56th Jungle Battalion in Santa Cecilia and the Marines Battalion in San Lorenzo – to navigate and patrol the waters along the Napo, Coca, Putumayo and San Miguel Rivers in support of counternarcotics operations against illegal armed groups, such as the FARC, and specifically their 48th Front. The patrol boatsare all designed to carry a crew of between eight and 12 Soldiers specialized to execute operations to protect the safety of the populace and sovereignty of their country over Ecuadorean waterways. Captain Oscar Abad, of the Ecuadorean Army’s Jungle and Counterinsurgency School, told Diálogo that seven fully armed and equipped crewmembers ride on each boat for a given patrol mission: three per side ready to shoot, and one machinist who handles the .50 caliber machine gun strategically positioned at the helm of each boat. “Each member is trained in the same skills, to be readily available to replace a fellow member that may be disabled in case of an emergency or attack,” he explained. In addition, he added, each mission requires the deployment of four boats at a time in order to execute thorough searches and actions. All four models have been specially designed or upgraded to have low-drive technologies with jet drive engines positioned underneath to facilitate better access through shallow, winding waterways that commonly carry debris like garbage, logs, roots, foliage, etc. Ecuador is only one of the countries to establish a stronger military presence along their waterways in recent years, and subsequently to be confronted with countering drug-trafficking. Belize, Guatemala, Honduras and Panama are undergoing the same efforts. It is for that reason that representatives of the military and public defense forces of these countries visited El Coca to witness a demonstration of the Ecuadorean Armed Forces’ achievements in this regard in August, 2012. During the event, Ecuadorean Army Colonel E. Acosta, commander of the 19th “Napo” Jungle Brigade, told Diálogo, “It is very important to be the regional pioneers in this respect. It’s significant to have our neighbors and partner nations visit our facilities and see what we do because it allows us to exchange information and become better professionals in this common fight.” Commander Efrain Mann of the Honduran Navy, explained that Honduras has an established riverine program of their own. “We employ boats with external turbo propulsion engines [that work better in deeper waters], so we are interested in assessing the possibility of incorporating the same type of boats in our rivers”. For his part, Belize Defense Force Major Charlton Roches told Diálogo that Belize is soon to receive two “Pantano” model boats for use in their riverine program. “We need to have a clear understanding of the employment of these vessels … their weaknesses and strengths,” he explained. More than countering transnational organized crime, like other countries, the focus of Belize’s river operations lies with the local transit of marijuana, said Maj. Roches. According to data presented by the Ecuadorean Armed Forces, as a result of Ecuador’s successful program, the northern border area has been essentially cleared of permanent armed FARC camps in the country because they are no longer able to operate with impunity. Their previously safe refuges have been reduced to simple crossings in small unarmed groups. Additionally, the camps that the Colombian rebel group formerly set up for rest and relaxation of their troops have been greatly reduced, coca plantations are largely non-existent in the northern border area and –as a cherry on top, according to Brig. Gen. Andrade, “the Ecuadorean and Colombian militaries have established a positive and cooperative relationship that allows us to exchange information, intelligence and support for each other through regular coordination meetings to counter drug trafficking jointly.”last_img read more

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4 Alligators Found in Peconic River

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Four baby alligators were pulled from the Peconic River on Friday, April 19, 2013 (DEC)Four baby alligators were pulled from the Peconic River on the East End on Friday morning, six months after 9 more baby gators were found in a 6-week span on Long Island.A Manorville man reported spotting one of the gators during his routine morning visit to the Connecticut Avenue canoe launch at 8 a.m., according to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. DEC officers responded, caught the two-foot long gator with a catch pole, then spotted three more gators nearby, authorities said.“Alligators released into Long Island waters have become an all too common occurrence in recent years,” DEC Regional Director Peter Scully said. “Individuals who attain these animals often find themselves incapable of caring for them as they grow, and they ultimately release them into the waters of Long Island where they are unable to survive and may pose a risk.”The incident comes a week before the DEC, Suffolk County SPCA and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service are scheduled to hold an illegal reptile and amphibian amnesty day on LI in which people can turn in the animals without fear of arrest.Alligators are illegal to own as pets in the state of New York. Those who use them for exhibition, research or educational purposes require a DEC permit.The DEC officers captured and secured the four latest gators and taped their jaws shut. They were taken to DEC’s Regional Headquarters in Stony Brook and will later be sent to the Long Island Aquarium in Riverhead.The alligators, whose sizes range from two to three feet—about the same size as the last batch found—and were lethargic because they were in cold water.The amnesty day will held 12-4 p.m. Saturday, April 17 at Sweetbriar Nature Center, 62 Eckernkamp Dr., Smithtown.“The purpose of this effort is to get these reptiles and amphibians into a controlled environment where they can be cared for properly,” Suffolk County SPCA Cheif Roy Gross said.  “People who are in possession of these animals unlawfully can turn them in to us without fear of prosecution. No one will be asked to give their name.”Species that do not require permits, or are not threatened or endanger will not be accepted.For more information about the amnesty program, call the Suffolk County SPCA at 631-382-7722, the DEC at 631-444-0250 or USFWS at 516-825-3950.To report any environmental crime, please contact DEC’s toll free 24-hour TIPP hotline at: 1-800-TIPP DEC (1-800-847-7332) or Dispatch number at 631-444-0250. DEC keeps the identity of all TIPP callers confidential.last_img read more

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Tech Time: How to build a proactive data security plan

first_imgWhen Canada’s largest credit union experienced a massive data breach in December 2018, the story quickly gained momentum. As the press reported on the incident, it was discovered that the breach was larger than initially expected, impacting all 4.2 million customers. Although the credit union took decisive action, they had to combat months of fallout from press coverage and work overtime to regain consumer confidence.The highly sensitive nature of financial information makes credit unions an attractive target for malicious actors, and vulnerabilities within a credit union’s operations can allow unintentional privacy violations as well as identity theft. To counter threats to your members’ data, you need more than cybersecurity policies. You need good cyber defense.Many businesses look to regulations like the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act and such security requirements as Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard for guidance in safeguarding sensitive information. While certifications like these are extremely important, businesses also need to actively prevent, detect and respond to security incidents. To mount an effective cyber defense, make sure these six elements are in your arsenal: threat intelligence and risk assessment, incident response, continuous monitoring, access control, security awareness training and communication. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Camelot headlines Tattersalls list

first_imgLast year’s dual Derby hero Camelot tops five Aidan O’Brien-trained possibles for Sunday’s Tattersalls Gold Cup at the Curragh. The four-year-old, who also won the 2000 Guineas at Newmarket last season, was struck down by colic after his run in the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe but reappeared this season with a straightforward win in the Mooresbridge Stakes. Also in the mix for the Ballydoyle team is last year’s Oaks winner Was, along with El Salvador, Windsor Palace and Ernest Hemingway. Al Kazeem has been given the green light to travel over by his trainer Roger Charlton after a good piece of work on Monday. Writing on his website, www.rogercharlton.com, the Beckhampton handler said: “We do not have many runners during the week, but Al Kazeem worked impressively with his lead horse over seven furlongs yesterday and he remains an intended runner at the Curragh on Sunday, where he is likely to meet up with the mighty Camelot in the Tattersalls Gold Cup.” Dermot Weld’s Ribblesdale winner Princess Highway could still run, despite disappointing in the Blue Wind Stakes last week. David Wachman’s Aloof and Joanna Morgan’s Negotiate are the other possibles. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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