Families Honored at Statehouse for their Agricultural Heritage

first_imgFayette Grimes/Vollmer By Gary Truitt – Mar 27, 2014 Larrison 1840 Indiana Lt. Gov. Sue Ellspermann and Indiana State Department of Agriculture Director Ted McKinney presented 31 families with a Hoosier Homestead Award in recognition of their commitment to Indiana agriculture. “There’s no doubt in our minds that agriculture plays a vital role in Indiana’s economy, but we also need to be reminded of the men and women behind the industry,” Lt. Gov. Sue Ellspermann said.  “The families honored today have persevered through trial and bounty to steward the earth and produce food for our state, nation and world.”To be named a Hoosier Homestead, farms must be owned by the same family for more than 100 consecutive years and consist of more than 20 acres or produce more than $1000 of agricultural products per year.  The Hoosier Homestead program is administered by the Indiana State Department of Agriculture. “The families celebrated here today remind us of what makes Indiana agriculture great,” Director McKinney said.  “Agriculture is not solely about producing food, fiber and fuel for a growing population.  It is also about preserving a way of life that values hard-work, integrity and community.  The Hoosier Homestead Award Program celebrates just that and ISDA is proud to oversee this awards program.”The 31 families honored at Thursday’s ceremony join more than 5000 Hoosier Homestead farms.  Annual recognition ceremonies are held in March during National Agriculture Month at the Indiana Statehouse and in August at the Indiana State Fair. Sesquicentennial Award Name Homestead Date Facebook Twitter Centennial Lawrence Blackford Decatur Scherschel Sesquicentennial Harrison Larrison Denney Shelby Carroll Centennial Centennial Huff 1907 Jefferson Ripley Centennial 1887 Spencer 1869 Kruse Dubois Catherine Joan and Richard Pence 1913 Centennial Elkhart Centennial 1910 Fountain 1859 Centennial 1813 Ackerman-Eckert-McKnight Floyd Jackson 1882 Schaaf Windell Chittick Centennial Centennial Rothert 1862 Sesquicentennial Sesquicentennial 1901 Mathew Decatur Posey Previous articleSenate Bill Would Limit EPA RegulationsNext articleApril Weather Outlook: No Major Changes in Patterns Gary Truitt 1869 Sesquicentennial Centennial White 1903 Centennial SHARE Sesquicentennial Hancockcenter_img Ping Home Indiana Agriculture News Families Honored at Statehouse for their Agricultural Heritage 1886 1863 Sesquicentennial Caldwell 1913 1912 Centennial Centennial 1850 Centennial Hicks Brown Award Sesquicentennial Centennial Henry Miami 1846 Rush Sesquicentennial Dorrel Families Honored at Statehouse for their Agricultural Heritage Jackson Williams Farm County 1854 Kuntz Noble Arvin and Anna Droege Hoosier Homestead Recipients | March 2014 Arthur L. Troyer Sesquicentennial Smith 1834 Ripley SHARE Spencer 1834 Sesquicentennial 1889 1913 Facebook Twitter John F. Thackery Boehm 1913 Centennial Tape Family Farm Waninger Spencer Pfister/Scarafia Sesquicentennial 1912 Mishler 1852 Bicentennial 1863 Posey 1913 Centennial 1857 1871 Steuben Miller Centennial Phillips Miamilast_img read more

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Prior censorship makes a comeback

first_imgNews Follow the news on Sudan April 10, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information April 6, 2020 Find out more June 7, 2010 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Prior censorship makes a comeback News Sudan : Press freedom still in transition a year after Omar al-Bashir’s removal Coronavirus infects press freedom in Africa Receive email alerts The editor of the Sudanese daily Ajras al-Huriya yesterday decided to suspend publication of the newspaper for one week in protest against the imposition of official censorship.The previous evening Sudanese security forces raided the premises of Ajras al-Huriya and those of several other papers, including Arabic-language opposition daily, al-Midan, and seized a number of copies.“We condemn the seizure of these publications by the Sudanese authorities”, Reporters Without Borders said. “The seizures on 5 June confirm a return to prior censorship of the Sudanese written press, following the first signs of renewal of the practice in mid-May.”“It amounts to an extremely serious setback for press freedom in this country. We offer our full support to these newspapers which are going through a difficult period. We hope that they will be able to express themselves freely when they resume publication.” Ajras al-Huriya had on 6 June been prevented from appearing for the third consecutive day. Other newspapers have received telephone calls telling them they did not have the right to cover some sensitive issues, such as the International Criminal Court or the doctors’ strike, under threat of being censored. ——————————————————————————————–2010.20.05 – Return to prior censorship of print media fearedReporters Without Borders is concerned that prior censorship could be restored in Sudan after security forces raided several newspapers yesterday in Khartoum, demanded to see the articles in preparation and prevented two newspapers from publishing several reports and editorials.The raids came just three days after the authorities closed down the opposition daily Rai al-Shaab and arrested four of its journalists. See the previous release .“After 20 months of prior censorship by the intelligence services, President Omar Al Bashir decreed an end to this practice in September 2009,” Reporters Without Borders said. “Last night’s developments seem to call this into question. We fear the government could be in the process of restoring censorship, which would be a historic reversal for press freedom and would signify a return to the darkest days of state surveillance of the print media.”After swooping on several newspapers last night, the security forces ordered the withdrawal and confiscation of several pages from Ajras al-Hurriya, a newspaper that supports Southern Sudan’s former rebels, and the independent newspaper Al-Sahafa. Fayez al-Silaik, the editor of Ajras al-Hurriya, said more than half of the pages of today’s issue were censored, making publication impossible.Reporters Without Borders also condemns threats by the local authorities against two independent radio stations in Southern Sudan, Miraya FM and Bakhita. Information and broadcasting minister Paul Mayom Akech accused Miraya FM of “exceeding its mandate” by broadcasting reports that were divisive and incited ethnic violence. He gave the United Nations Mission in Sudan (UNMIS), which operates the station, a week to “put the editorial body in order,” failing which the station would be closed. Radio Bakhita also risks losing its licence if it does not modify its programme content. The government of Southern Sudan is accusing it of devoting too much time to covering political developments instead of broadcasting religious programmes.Picture : Sudanese newspapers (AFP / Ashraz Shazly) center_img RSF_en to go further News Covid-19 in Africa: RSF joins a coalition of civil society organizations to demand the release of imprisoned journalists on the continent SudanAfrica News Organisation SudanAfrica March 29, 2020 Find out morelast_img read more

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