Red & Yellow invests in people

first_imgThe learnership includes six months of training at the school itself after which the students are placed with various companies in the industry for six months. Here they get on-the-job experience and a proper taste of life in the industry. (Image: Red & Yellow)The Red & Yellow School of marketing and advertising has a plan to transform the face of the South African marketing and advertising industry through its Springboard Marketing institute.The institute is Red & Yellow’s way of contributing to social and economic upliftment in South Africa and is based on the idea that everybody has a right to education. Through its Red & Yellow Springboard Marketing Institute (RYSMI), the school offers students from disadvantaged backgrounds – who would otherwise be unable to attend the school – a chance to learn about and enter the world of marketing and advertising. At the institute, these students gain the knowledge and skills they need to go out and influence the industry and build careers.SPRINGBOARD TO A BRIGHTER FUTUREThe institute is a learnership offered to promising young individuals. It includes six months of training at the school itself after which the students are placed with various companies in the industry for six months. Here they get on-the-job experience and a proper taste of life in the industry.“It’s an exciting opportunity for them, and many view this as an opportunity to understand the science behind how brands communicate with them (and consumers) on a daily basis,” said Steph Houslay, Red & Yellow’s course director in Johannesburg.“They’re driven to succeed, for themselves and for their families and communities.”Through this initiative the school hopes to create a brighter future for talented young individuals who lack the resources to study for an industry-related qualification. “I am hugely excited and proud to be part of Springboard. This mutually beneficial relationship is the catalyst to real transformation we need to see our industry grow.”The institute’s work will also serve to counter the ongoing growth of the income gap by arming underprivileged individuals with what they need to compete with their affluent counterparts on even ground.One of the targets set by the school is to educate at least 100 000 graduates in Africa by 2020, with at least 10% or 10 000 of those students receiving free education as part of its transformation and skills development initiatives. (Image: Red & Yellow)THE RED & YELLOW MISSIONOne of the targets set by the school is to educate at least 100 000 graduates in Africa by 2020, with at least 10% or 10 000 of those students receiving free education as part of its transformation and skills development initiatives.“After knocking on countless companies’ doors for leanerships/internships and jobs with no answer, RYSMI finally opened,” said Matome Malatji, one of the first students to go through the springboard initiative.“I learned about the business and marketing environments; and creating my own business plan to understanding consumer behaviour; what a brief was and how to construct one; assessing a brief; events and project management; and lots more.“Personally, I learned to rationalise and interrogate my thinking and ask ‘why?’ and answer that and ask ‘why?’ again. Today, I can honestly say that I am a better person because of the lifelong lessons I learned. Now the future looks very bright. God made it possible but RYSMI made it happen.”PLAY YOUR PARTAre you playing your part to help improve the lives of the people around you or the environment? Do you know of anyone who has gone out of their way to help improve South Africa and its people?If so, submit your story or video to our website and let us know what you are doing to improve the country for all.last_img read more

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Traditional techniques stare at extinction

first_imgKeeping a close eye on the earthen pot, Manglem P. is heedful of the last drop that may plop through the hole at its bottom any second. As soon as it does, he springs forth towards a frame set on a throne under a canopy. And nimbly prods to one end a pierced Kang seed, eight of them dangling from a thread taut between a wooden female idol and a male one. Then, at his gesture, a player standing next to him strikes a drum once with a whack, signalling the passage of an hour. But now, the timekeeping method practised by Manipuri rulers for centuries, Tanyeishang, requiring a priest and a drummer to man three devices round the clock, has given way to a much simpler, convenient and economical alternative — the mechanical clock.Patronised by kingsPatronised by the rulers of Manipurs and practised in palaces for centuries, the demanding method is now confined to the Meitei New Year celebration in April. And the setting of its devices — an earthen vessel, two pots, a frame and a drum — has become a place of worship in Imphal East district. On the occasion of International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples on Friday, villagers from across States, including Manipur, demonstrated the workings of such traditional technologies, staring at extinction due to mechanisation and low demand, at installations at the Indira Gandhi Rashtriya Manav Sangrahalaya here.“Tribals and villagers are not only close to nature, they still negotiate their lives using these elementary technologies. They have survived using these for hundreds of years. But gradually, these are getting wiped out from the collective societal base,” Sarit K. Chaudhuri, director of the museum. At another installation, Sakuntala boils saline water extracted from a tree trunk for three-four hours, scoops out salty froth and spatters it over a cloth to let it dry. “Many back in Manipur have given up this method of making salt. A 100 gm of it sells for ₹20 and 1 kg of packed iodised salt sells for the same amount. Therefore, people buy it only on rare occasions like marriages and rituals,” she said.last_img read more

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Everyone in sport must be accountable: Manisha Malhotra

first_imgManisha MalhotraThe recent controversy over teaming up tennis icons Leander Paes and Mahesh Bhupathi for the London Olympics is symptomatic of what ails Indian sport. While the former partners went to town about not setting foot on court together, what surprised a lot of people was the All India Tennis,Manisha MalhotraThe recent controversy over teaming up tennis icons Leander Paes and Mahesh Bhupathi for the London Olympics is symptomatic of what ails Indian sport. While the former partners went to town about not setting foot on court together, what surprised a lot of people was the All India Tennis Association (AITA) openly taking sides. This is nothing new. Inept handling of ace players is prevalent in all sports in the country.While the federation was confident that it would convince both Mahesh and Leander to bury the hatchet once again (it has intervened several times in the past), its intention was suspect. Was it doing things in the best interest of the players, country or itself? Neither player wanted to play with the other. So putting in a duo that has been to the last three Olympics without any success and who have openly said they cannot win with each other is not exactly in the best interests of the country. Of course, AITA couldn’t have been questioned excessively because this is the best team on paper, and had they paired up and failed (again), no one in India would have cared about accountability anyway.This should change. The country should come first, then the system, and players should really not be able to dictate their terms and conditions to either. However, there is a huge disconnect between all three in our nation, which could really be why we fare so poorly in the medals tally.The Government of India is the biggest funder of sport; it has the highest number of facilities and yet, at the end of the day, it has no say. The federations, who take the “we are autonomous bodies” stand while availing of government funds, still call all the shots, and then come the players. Does this bode well for sport? Absolutely not.Federations in India have the benefit of being in a position where they can do as they please without any accountability. It could be decades without medals and still it’s status quo. Even players mistrust the federations, which is why they are sometimes not willing to listen to them and at other times listen only under duress of disciplinary action. The players know that in every federation the people calling the shots are not experts and therein lies the problem. The selection committees consist of ‘yes men’ or cronies of the people in power. The federations are also not working towards the best interests of players. Most federations don’t even have a logical and transparent system which leaves the window for last-minute politicking wide open. Is this because they don’t know how to come up with a successful system or because they don’t want to? The federations really need to realise that they exist to serve the players.advertisementThe Government is also to blame. It has been trying to rein in federations and reprimand them while its own Sports Authority of India (sai) is in a shambles, being run by people who have no idea about sport. SAI has ‘advisers’ with very little credibility. It does have foreign experts for almost all the priority sports, yet the experts’ opinions are never taken. Instead, it is the ‘government observer’ who has the say. So we can go to the Olympics and not win a single medal and still everything would be fine.Then there are the players. The Indian athlete has metamorphosed from the ‘poor soul’ to someone who has a voice. The handful of successful athletes are first to say they are all products “in spite of the system”  and not because of it. They now use their success as a bargaining chip to coerce both the Government and the federations. Any decent result (even a South Asian Games medal) and the athletes are eager to cash in. After the 2010 Commonwealth Games, athletes only started practising in March 2011 because they were busy going from felicitation to felicitation, sometimes for as little as Rs 5,000.It is not hard to come up with a system; there are specialists available the world over to help with this. Until we can come up with a system that is best for the country, we will keep dealing with ineptitudes and get nowhere. The system has to be bigger than any one factor and be answerable only to the results that it achieves. Everyone in sport must be accountable and until we are bound by nothing but results, we will never achieve the dreams we all have for sport in our country. advertisement-A former tennis champion, Manisha Malhotra is CEO of Mittal Champions Trustlast_img read more

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