Bimonthly decides to suspend publication after receiving threats

first_imgNews Organisation News RSF_en February 13, 2020 Find out more Help by sharing this information The 2020 pandemic has challenged press freedom in Africa November 27, 2020 Find out more Covid-19 in Africa: RSF joins a coalition of civil society organizations to demand the release of imprisoned journalists on the continent RwandaAfrica to go furthercenter_img Reports RwandaAfrica Follow the news on Rwanda BBC Africa’s “disproportionate and dangerous” dismissal of a journalist The publisher of the bimonthly Ishema, Fidèle Gakire, decided jointly with the newspaper’s board to suspend publication for a month on 28 August as a result of the serious threats he has reportedly been receiving. The newspaper has had problems ever since it ran an opinion piece in mid-July that called President Paul Kagame a “sociopath.”“Ishema’s decision reflects the unease that independent publications often feel in Rwanda,” Reporters Without Borders said. “After being taken to task by the pro-government High Media Council, the newspaper apologized and its publisher was sanctioned. He has nonetheless continued to be the target of threats and a smear campaign and this has prompted him to temporarily suspend operations.”Gakire quickly apologized after the High Media Council, the state-run media regulatory body, ruled that the reference to the president as a “sociopath” was libellous. The newspaper’s editor, Didas Niyifasha, resigned claiming the article was published without his knowledge. At the same time, the Forum of Private Newspapers suspended Gakire for six months as a member.Gakire then lost no time in bringing out a special issue of Ishema with the word Imbabazi (Sorry) on the cover and virtually nothing inside but old articles praising the president which the newspaper had published in the past.The authorities and pro-government journalists hailed Ishema’s reaction and praised media self-regulation.But a member of the public complained to the High Media Council a few days later claiming he had been wronged by the newspaper. Then Ancilla Mukarubuga, a woman living in the Kigali district of Gasabo, said she had been shocked by articles published in Ishema and, in her neighbourhood, collected 1,500 signatures to a petition for sanctions against the newspaper. Finally, Gakire reported receiving serious threats in recent days.A debate about media self-regulation is meanwhile under way in Rwanda and a new media law is being discussed in parliament. It would transfer responsibility for media regulation from the High Media Council to a panel of journalists. As first step to creating this self-regulatory body, Rwanda’s journalists have just adopted a new code of professional conduct. April 6, 2020 Find out more Receive email alerts News August 31, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Bimonthly decides to suspend publication after receiving threatslast_img read more

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New weapon against breast cancer

first_imgHarvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and collaborators at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) have identified a molecular marker in normal breast tissue that can predict a woman’s risk for developing breast cancer, the leading cause of death in women with cancer worldwide.The work, led by HSCI principal faculty member Kornelia Polyak and Rulla Tamimi of BWH, was published in an early online release and in the April 1 issue of Cancer Research.The study builds on Polyak’s earlier research finding that women already identified as having a high risk of developing cancer — namely those with a mutation called BRCA1 or BRCA2 — or women who did not give birth before their 30s had a higher number of mammary gland progenitor cells.In the latest study, Polyak, Tamimi, and their colleagues examined biopsies, some taken as many as four decades ago, from 302 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study and the Nurses’ Health Study II who had been diagnosed with benign breast disease. The researchers compared tissue from the 69 women who later developed cancer to the tissue from the 233 women who did not. They found that women were five times as likely to develop cancer if they had a higher percentage of Ki67, a molecular marker that identifies proliferating cells, in the cells that line the mammary ducts and milk-producing lobules. These cells, called the mammary epithelium, undergo drastic changes throughout a woman’s life, and the majority of breast cancers originate in these tissues.Doctors already test breast tumors for Ki67 levels, which can inform decisions about treatment, but this is the first time scientists have been able to link Ki67 to precancerous tissue and use it as a predictive tool.“Instead of only telling women that they don’t have cancer, we could test the biopsies and tell women if they were at high risk or low risk for developing breast cancer in the future,” said Polyak, a breast cancer researcher at Dana-Farber and co-senior author of the paper.“Currently, we are not able to do a very good job at distinguishing women at high and low risk of breast cancer,” added co-senior author Tamimi, an associate professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. “By identifying women at high risk of breast cancer, we can better develop individualized screening and also target risk reducing strategies.”To date, mammograms are the best tool for the early detection, but there are risks associated with screening. False positive and negative results and over-diagnosis could cause psychological distress, delay treatment, or lead to overtreatment, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI).Mammography machines also use low doses of radiation. While a single mammogram is unlikely to cause harm, repeated screening can potentially cause cancer, though the NCI writes that the benefits “nearly always outweigh the risks.”“If we can minimize unnecessary radiation for women at low risk, that would be good,” said Tamimi.Screening for Ki67 levels would “be easy to apply in the current setting,” said Polyak, though the researchers first want to reproduce the results in an independent cohort of women.last_img read more

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Wading River Man Charged With Attempted Rape at Gunpoint

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 30-year-old Wading River man has been arrested for allegedly assaulting a woman at gunpoint and trying to rape her behind Wildwood Bowling Alley in Northampton this week, Southampton Town Police said.Richard Rause was charged with attempted first-degree rape, criminal possession of a weapon and escape after authorities said fled from a detective’s vehicle after he was taken into custody.Police said the victim fought off Rause, who allegedly punched her repeatedly, and called 911 to report the attempted sexual assault at 2:15 p.m. Wednesday.Southampton Town Police, Suffolk County police New York State police launched a manhunt that included K-9 officers and helicopters before the suspect was apprehended at his home, authorities said.Rause, who was taken back into custody shortly after his alleged escape, police said.Arraignment information for Rause was not immediately available.last_img read more

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McIlroy named golfer of the year

first_img McIlroy also played in all five sessions as Europe won the Ryder Cup at Gleneagles, claiming three points as the United States were defeated 16.5-11.5 “To be named the European Tour’s Golfer of the Year for a second time is a huge honour and one I am extremely proud of,” he said. “If I had won any one of those four titles it would have been a good year, but to win all four, to win The Race to Dubai, and to be part of another fantastic European victory in The Ryder Cup, means it is a great one. “This award is a very nice way to round off the year. The European Tour has always been good to me, so it is always special to be recognised in this way. Hopefully I can have more years like this one and win the award again.” The award is decided by a panel comprising members of the Association of Golf Writers and commentators from television and radio and McIlroy has been awarded the honour for the second time after also winning in 2012. European Tour chief executive George O’Grady said: “The 2014 season will go down as one of the greatest in the European Tour’s history, and it will be defined by Rory McIlroy’s astounding accomplishments on the global stage. “Europe’s performance to retain The Ryder Cup and Martin Kaymer’s dominant victories in the US Open and Players Championship on the US PGA Tour alone would have made it a year to remember for European golf, but Rory’s victories in four of the biggest championships on our international schedule will ensure the story of this season is retold for many years to come. Quite rightly, therefore, it is Rory who receives our Golfer of the Year Award for 2014. “Rory is a fine ambassador for the game of golf and a loyal supporter of the European Tour, as he has shown with his backing of the Irish Open next year, so we are all very proud of his success, not only during this year but across his career to date.” The Northern Irishman won the Race to Dubai and topped the PGA Tour money list, as well as winning the Open Championship and US PGA Championship as he reclaimed the world number one spot. The 25-year-old also won the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational and the BMW PGA Championship at Wentworth, and adds the honour to the Golf Writers Trophy he was awarded last week. Rory McIlroy has been named the 2014 Race to Dubai European Tour Golfer of the Year after a stunning season on both sides of the Atlantic.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

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