20 Best control, least toxic

first_imgBy April Reese University of Georgia Volume XXVIII Number 1 Page 20 Improperly applied gardening chemicals may run off landscapes and pollute water. In some cases, gardening runoff has killed fish.”The National Academy of Sciences reported that homeowners tend to use as much as 10 times more chemicals per acre (in and around their homes) than farmers use on their land,” said Susan Varlamoff. She’s an environmental sciences program coordinator with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.”Our urban streams contain more pesticides, and at generally higher concentrations, than rural ones,” she said.Varlamoff said integrated pest management, or IPM, focuses on using cultural, mechanical and biological control methods in place of chemical pesticides in home landscapes.Is it really a pest?”Most people don’t realize that only 3 percent of insects are pests,” said Varlamoff, who is also a Georgia Master Gardener.”It’s important to know the difference between beneficial insects, which control pests naturally, and insects that devour your roses,” she said.Best method, least toxicOnce they identify the pest, gardeners who practice IPM use the best and least toxic combination of controls.Cultural Use plants suited for local rainfall, sun exposure, temperature, etc. Choose pest-resistant plants as often as you can. Choose a turf variety well-suited to your soils and climate. This makes the grass more competitive with weeds. Rotate vegetable and annual plants to avoid reoccurring pest problems such as root-knot nematodes. Till soils to destroy pests and crop residue that may harbor pests. Plant vegetables early in the growing season to avoid damaging levels of pests that may occur later.Mechanical Hand-destroy insect pests or hand-remove weeds if the pest density and number aren’t excessive. Prune or cut out diseased or insect-infested plants or plant parts. This can be used to control cankers, stem galls and boring insects. Mow grass so you remove no more than one-third of the height. Scalping grass stresses it, dries it out and promotes insect pests such as chinch bugs. Mulch vegetable gardens and ornamental plants with 3 to 5 inches of compost, pine bark or and pine needles. This reduces weeds and the need for herbicides and prevents soil erosion. Mulch can be made from homemade compost. Direct water sprays at infested plants to reduce aphids, lacebugs and other insect pests on plants.BiologicalParasites and predators in landscapes attack and kill insect pests. It’s important to conserve and enhance naturally occurring biological control agents in the landscape and vegetable garden. Don’t kill the good bugs. Before you grab the pesticide, learn the difference between beneficial insects and pests. In a well-balanced ecosystem, the good guys beat out the bad. Plant a variety of flowering annuals or perennials to provide more nectar sources and alternative prey for predators and parasites. Create landscape habitats that attract birds and other wildlife that prey on insect pests. For more information, contact the Georgia Wildlife Federation or visit www.gwf.org/education.htm.ChemicalYou may not always be able to control pests without using conventional chemicals.”Pesticides are often an important component of an IPM program,” Varlamoff said. “But you can harm people, pets and your environment if you use them irresponsibly. Like medicine, pesticides can have tremendous benefits, but misuse can have serious consequences.” Read the label. Select a pesticide based on the target pest, the plants you want to protect, the application equipment you have and the pesticide hazards. Use the least toxic control for the pest. Pesticides also include horticultural oils and insecticidal soaps that are less toxic than conventional pesticides. They can effectively manage certain insects. Apply pesticides only to the intended area. Blanket coverage may destroy beneficial insects as well as pests.”No single herbicide, insecticide or fungicide is appropriate for all landscape and vegetable pest problems,” Varlamoff said.For more information, see the Georgia Pest Control Handbook (www.ent.uga.edu/pest2001/) or Extension Toxicology Network at: (ace.orst.edu/info/extoxnet/).last_img read more

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Ten auction results from ‘active’ weekend in Cairns

first_img Former actor’s FNQ house for sale 61A Kewarra St, Kewarra Beach went under contract to a member of the auction the following morning.These two properties at Kewarra Beach’s “millionaire’s row” were offered to buyers firstly in a two-for-one sale. Marketed as a developer’s dream or perfect for multi-generational living, 61A was ready to move in to, while 61B was the “renovator”. It was always likely the two properties would attract the interest of multiple buyers with varying views and while 61B sold under the hammer for $385,000, 61A went under contract to an auction audience member “in reserve vicinity”. 6/13-15 Harris St, Parramatta Park Last weekend Ray White Cairns Beaches was one of the busiest agencies in town with six auctions on Sunday, September 20. It sold three properties under the hammer and had entered into a contract for another after bidding ended. “We had six auctions and it was the first time this year we’ve done that many,” Ray White Cairns Beaches principal Paul Stirling said. “We’ve usually done two to four each weekend. “Every property had a registered bidder and we recorded 48 bids across six properties and that’s pretty good. “We’re coming into a very active period in the market place and there are a lot of buyers around at the moment, so to create a competitive environment for the owner. There’s no better way to sell a property. “Auctions will deliver to an owner exactly where the market is so they can make an informed decision on whether to sell or not.”This is a snapshot of the auction results across the city in the past week. 61A and 61B Kewarra St, Kewarra Beach 13 Bellevue Crescent, Edge Hill Kim Ryan and Nadine Edwards – LJ Hooker Cairns Edge Hill – PASSED IN 15 Darkin Close, Smithfield Ray White Cairns Beaches principal Paul Stirling hosts an auction via livestream. His agency had six properties listed for auction las weekend. MORE NEWS The past week was one of the busiest for auctions in Cairns in recent months. Pic: iStock.AUCTION activity across Cairns has been heating up with the past week one of the city’s busiest in recent months. As sellers look to extract the most value out of their homes during a time of high property demand and low stock, auctions are again slowly becoming a desirable method of sale, after lockdowns had led to a point where the Far North went without one for weeks at a time. In recent weeks, Cairns agents had been urging vendors to consider auctioning their property following competitive market conditions.Agents were reporting they were conducting silent auctions anyway — with multiple offers on listed properties outbidding each other and buyers missing out on homes due to the competition. Mr Stirling sold these two commercial properties under the hammer on September 20 for $831,000 and $19,500 respectively. 66 Fairview St, Bentley Park 66 Fairview St, Bayview Heights sold under the hammer for $415,000.More from newsCairns home ticks popular internet search terms2 days agoCool properties on the market in North Queensland right now18 Sep 2020Elite Real Estate Services’ Karl Latham sold this four-bedroom house under the hammer on September 19 for $415,000. Listed on the market for the first time since 1973, Mr Latham had described the 800sq m property’s shed as the most “epic” residential shed he had seen. He said the detached 150sq m shed was built like a three-bedroom house. 3 MacNamara Street Manunda Nadine Edwards – LJ Hooker Cairns Edge Hill – PASSED IN 2 Maree St, Freshwater Five Cairns ‘village’ homes This two-bedroom apartment at Parramatta Park did not sell under the hammer, but on Thursday Mr Stirling said he was expecting an offer from a person who viewed the property during the auction campaign “within 24-48 hours.” 75-77 Ardisia St, Smithfield and 6/24 Coondoo St, Kuranda Ray Murphy – RE/MAX – PASSED IN 42 Junction St, Edge Hill Cairns Property Office’s Kerry Ah Chin auctioned this three-bedroom house on September 19. And Although it was passed, it went under contract with a bidder the following morning, receiving multiple offers. 1/10 Mayton Cl, Manoora Property Shop’s Lance Richards sold this two-bedroom townhouse under the hammer on September 23 for $110,000. Its new owners are set to enjoy low body corporate fees in a quiet complex of seven properties. OTHER RESULTS Wayne Vowles – Ray White Smithfield – PASSED INlast_img read more

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Callie Hoegeman

first_imgCallie Hoegeman, age 79 of Batesville, died Sunday, April 16, 2017 at her home.  Born October 19, 1937, in Burning Springs, Kentucky, she is the daughter of Amanda (Nee: Lunsford) and Samuel Jewell.  She married Albert Hoegeman Sr. July 20, 1956 in Brookville, Indiana and he preceded her in death December 25, 2010.  She was a homemaker and a member of Batesville Eagles Aerie #1130 and the Batesville V.F.W. Post #3183 Ladies Auxiliary.Callie enjoyed trying her luck at the casino, playing bingo or in a poker game.  She and Albert liked walking in the woods, fishing and taking drives, looking for new fishing holes to try.  For years she bowled in leagues, got a kick out of playing video games and according to her family, was an excellent cook whose chicken and dumplings and banana pudding will be sorely missed.  Callie was a Colts fan or a Peyton Manning fan depending on who you asked and her family laughed that while she’s never held a golf club in her life, she followed it on T.V. and was a diehard Tiger Woods fan and more recently rooted for Rickie Fowler.  What she loved best was having the family together and spending time with her grandkids.Callie is survived by her daughters Margaret Barry of Greensburg, Indiana, Brenda Allen of Batesville; sons Don Hoegeman of Batesville, Willie Hoegeman of Milan, Indiana, Dave Hoegeman of Sunman, Indiana; brother James Jewell of North Vernon, Indiana; 20 grandchildren and 28 great grandchildren.  In addition to her husband and parents, she is also preceded in death by her son Albert Hoegeman Jr., brothers Carlos, Samuel, Ted and Homer Jewell and sisters Maggie Gilbreath and Lucy Cranfill.Visitation is Thursday, April 20th, from 10 a.m. until 1 p.m. at the Weigel Funeral Home.  Funeral services follow at 1 p.m. with Rev. Steve Yeaton officiating and burial will be in St. John’s Huntersville Cemetery.  The family requests memorials to American Lung Association.last_img read more

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