May Showers

first_imgMay’s warm, wet conditions brought relief to the parched areas of the state, and Georgians can expect more of the same in June.The rain was welcomed by farmers, but so much rain in such a short period of time delayed planting in some areas and caused erosion and flash-flooding problems.Almost the whole state received above-normal precipitation in May, except for a few small areas scattered around south Georgia, and even those areas received close-to-normal precipitation.Savannah, Georgia, set a new daily rainfall record on May 22 with 6.61 inches, smashing the old record of 2.21 inches set in 1967. Athens, Georgia, also set a new daily record on May 21 with 2.42 inches, surpassing the old record of 1.6 inches set in 1888. Brunswick, Georgia, received 1.31 inches on May 24, which broke that city’s old record of 0.91 inches set in 2009.This was the wettest May in Savannah’s 144-year record, beating out the old monthly record of 11.13 inches set in 1915. It was also the sixth-wettest May for Macon, Georgia, in 121 years.The highest daily rainfall totals recorded by Community Collaborative Rain, Hail and Snow Network (CoCoRaHS) volunteers were 5.15 and 4.91 inches, both from observers near Pooler, Georgia, in Chatham County. The highest monthly total — 11.92 inches — came from an observer near Villa Rica, Georgia, in Carroll County, followed by 11.28 inches measured near Rincon, Georgia, in Effingham County, and 10.58 inches measured near Acworth, Georgia, in Cobb County.Savannah had the state’s highest monthly precipitation total for May — 11.54 inches, 8.56 inches above normal, according to National Weather Service stations. The lowest precipitation total came in Valdosta, Georgia — 2.34 inches, 0.19 inches below normal.  Albany, Georgia, received 3.83 inches of precipitation, 1.14 inches above normal.Alma, Georgia, received 3.52 inches of precipitation, 1.05 inches above normal.Athens received 6.24 inches of precipitation, 3.24 inches above normal.Atlanta received 4.6 inches of precipitation, 0.93 of an inch above normal.Augusta, Georgia, received 3.34 inches of precipitation, 0.69 of an inch above normal.Brunswick received 4.03 inches of precipitation, 2.07 inches above normal.Columbus, Georgia, received 5.37 inches of precipitation, 2.18 inches above normal.Macon received 6.07 inches of precipitation, 3.35 inches above normal.Rome, Georgia, received 5.91 inches of precipitation, 1.73 inches above normal.Above-normal temperatures covered most of Georgia in May 2017. All but two National Weather Service offices reported temperatures as much as 3 degrees above normal. May was the 16th month in a row that the state saw above-normal temperatures.A number of record temperatures were tied or set in May. A daily high temperature record was set in Savannah on May 10, when 95 degrees Fahrenheit surpassed the old record of 94 F set in 1889. Two record highs were tied in Brunswick: a high of 93 F on May 10, originally set in 2003, and a high of 96 F on May 11, set in 1973.High nighttime temperature records were tied in Savannah on May 21 at 74 F, which matches the old record from 1902, and in Brunswick on May 11 with 71 F, which matches the old record from 1966. Brunswick also broke its high nighttime temperature record on May 1 at 75 F, which beat the old record of 73 F set in 1954.Low daytime temperature records were also set on May 5 at a number of stations including Atlanta, Athens, Columbus and Macon, with maximum temperatures on that date reaching only the mid-50s. Columbus’ new record of 57 F beat its old record of 66 F set in 1987.In Alma, the monthly average temperature was 74.5 F, 0.8 of a degree above normal.In Atlanta, the monthly average temperature was 71.1 F, 1 degree above normal.In Athens, the monthly average temperature was 70.4 F, 0.4 of a degree above normal.In Augusta, the monthly average temperature was 74.1 F, 3 degrees above normal.In Albany, the monthly average temperature was 74.5 F, which was neither above nor below normal.In Columbus, the monthly average temperature was 73.4 F, 0.4 of a degree above normal.In Macon, the monthly average temperature was 71.8 F, 0.1 of a degree below normal.In Savannah, the monthly average temperature was 75.5 F, 2.2 degrees above normal.In Brunswick, the monthly average temperature was 76.7 F, 2.2 degrees above normal.In Rome, the monthly average temperature was 70 F, 1.8 degrees above normal.In Valdosta, the monthly average temperature was 73.5 F, 0.3 of a degree below normal.March frost damage estimates continue to come in — about 80 percent of the peach crop was lost as well as 85 percent of the blueberry crop. Many farmers will not have any fruit to sell outside of the state.The outlook for June shows that an increased chance of cooler- and wetter-than-normal conditions is likely, particularly in the northern half of the state. Drought is expected to recede in the southern counties, and dry conditions are likely to be eliminated farther north. The summer forecast still shows an increased chance of above-normal temperatures, particularly in the driest areas.For more information, please see the “Climate and Agriculture in the South East” blog at blog.extension.uga.edu/climate/ or visit www.gaclimate.org. Please email [email protected] to share your agricultural weather and climate impacts on the blog.last_img read more

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Hill, Donovan step to front

first_imgLAS VEGAS — Needing something — anything — to avoid becoming the next highly-ranked team to fall in the early weeks of 2007, Wisconsin’s leaders showed their true colors.Running back P.J. Hill shouldered the load all game long when the offense wasn’t at its best, and quarterback Tyler Donovan put his body in harm’s way to give the Badgers the win.Hill wanted the ball in his hand on every down, despite game-time temperatures in the upper 90s.”That’s the kind of player P.J. is. He wants the ball in his hands,” Donovan said. “He’s a playmaker, gamebreaker — a guy that you love to have on your team.”Although tired, hot and facing a defense with seemingly relentless energy, Hill plowed his way for his biggest three yards of the game on fourth-and-one from UNLV’s 39-yard line.”I got on the headphones with coach (Paul) Chryst and just said, ‘give me the ball, give me the ball,’ because I knew we were in a tight jam, and sometimes the weight is on my back, so I just took it upon myself to tell him, ‘just give it to me,'” Hill said.Hill finished with 147 yards on 30 carries, but it was fifth-year senior Donovan who carried Wisconsin to victory, hurdling over the diving reach of Rebel linebacker Starr Fuimaono behind the line and, with a terrific seal block from wide receiver Luke Swan, diving into the far corner of the end zone, just inside the markers. The touchdown capped a 10-play, 61-yard drive that spanned 5:40.”I was going to do everything in my power to make him miss and go down and get a score,” Donovan said.Donovan, who has had trouble maintaining his balance in the open field, slipping and sliding for whatever reason, looked seamless on his 29-yard game-winning scamper.During the run, Donovan could only think about one thing: going all out.”You have to thrive in those situations,” Donovan said. “At the quarterback position, you have to step up and be a leader and show the guys the way.”I thought that this was a really good test for our team.”Not only did Donovan exhibit the traits of a leader — toughness, willingness to do whatever it takes — on that game-winning drive, he radiated that persona on nearly every down.When his receivers got locked up downfield Donovan was forced to keep it himself on a number of occasions. Instead of giving himself up to the defense, like many quarterbacks do to save themselves by sliding, Donovan would fight for the first down. Sometimes brutal hits resulted.Coolly, Donovan would walk them off and live to play another down.”That’s the type of player I am — step ups, make plays,” Donovan said. “Every yard counts, so that’s P.J. getting that extra yard [on fourth down] and that’s me getting that yard.”While the receivers struggled to catch some passes and Donovan himself wasn’t at his best, he and Hill found a way to rally the team around them and come through with a victory.”There will be several teams in the country this year that will be put in the same situation on the road, hostile environment because you made it that way, didn’t play well in the first half and got ourselves into a dogfight,” Bielema said. “But the way they handled themselves in the third and fourth quarter, it was a collective team effort to get a win.”Of his leaders Donovan and Hill, Bielema thinks his team has two good model citizens when it comes to football.”I think that they refuse to lose,” he said. “Late in the third quarter, things began to unfold defensively especially. They just find a spirit, something inside of them to take over a game and win it.”last_img read more

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Students watching Elite Eight game in dorms react to loss against Ohio State

first_img Published on March 24, 2012 at 12:00 pm Contact Jessica: [email protected] | @JessicaIannetta With 12 people crammed into a small lounge on the third floor of Brewster Hall, TJ Pruden had to guard his chair. ‘Don’t you dare steal my seat!’ he shouted to one of his friends, who was trying to move around the crowded room. Pruden, a freshman mechanical engineering major, spent all season making sure he had a good seat for Syracuse basketball games. He camped out for the Georgetown game and managed to snag front row seats and camera time. The clip from that game, featuring Pruden and others in the first row, has been shown on the selection show and Sports Center. During half-time of Syracuse’s loss to Ohio State in the Elite Eight on Saturday, Pruden said he was optimistic about the team’s chances and thought Syracuse could make the Final Four. ‘I think we’re deep enough to win. I think they might run out of steam,’ he said. ‘It’s going to be a really exciting second half.’AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Over in the first floor lounge of Haven Hall, students were watching the game with bated breath, seated in four rows of couches. There was no sound except for the occasional cheer or moan in response to the action playing out on the screen. Ten minutes into the second half, Ohio State had still not run out of steam. Krysta Kirby was sitting in the front row of couches. The freshman biology major said she is used to nail-biting SU basketball games. She is from the Syracuse area and said she has been a fan for most of her life. ‘I just love the way they play,’ Kirby said. ‘They play so hard.’ Her friend, Nina Green, who camped out with Kirby for both the Georgetown and UConn games, said she just became an SU basketball fan this year, but has quickly come to love the camaraderie among its supporters. ‘We got to know some people in Otto’s Army,’ said Green, a communications design major. ‘It’s just so comforting knowing that other people really care about basketball.’ On the screen, Syracuse managed to come within four points of Ohio State, close enough to give Kirby hope the Orange could win. ‘I actually remember saying ‘Oh, wouldn’t it be so cool if my freshman year we went to the national championship again?” she said. ‘I think we can win. We just have to keep playing our game.’ But Syracuse didn’t keep playing its game. As the buzzer sounded to end the team’s season, Katie Zeppetelli and her friends sat in the eighth floor lounge of Sadler Hall in stunned silence. ‘I’m very disappointed,’ she said. ‘I really thought we were going to catch up at one point, and then the last minute I was like, ‘Uh oh, this is not going to go well.” Zeppetelli, a freshman education major, said she never expected Syracuse to get this far. ‘This year, I wasn’t expecting to do this well. And then we started winning a lot, and we were undefeated,’ she said trailing off. ‘We were so close.’ [email protected]  Facebook Twitter Google+center_img Commentslast_img read more

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