Agricultural Trade Promotion Program funding

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest On Jan. 31, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue announced details of a key component of the Trump administration’s trade mitigation package designed to address the effects of retaliatory measures impacting exports of U.S. agricultural products. The Agricultural Trade Promotion Program (ATP) provides additional funding to help U.S. exporters develop new markets and help mitigate the adverse effects of other countries’ tariff and non-tariff barriers.The U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) is one of 57 organizations that will receive ATP funding through the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service (FAS).“USMEF appreciates the Trump administration’s recognition of the extremely competitive environment U.S. agricultural products face in the global marketplace, and how changes in trading partners’ tariff rates can put these products at a significant disadvantage,” said Dan Halstrom, USMEF President and CEO. “As authorized by FAS, this funding will help USMEF and other organizations defend existing market share and develop new destinations for U.S. agricultural products, which is especially important at a time when trade disputes and preferential trade agreements have further intensified competition in many key markets.”last_img read more

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Deep-Set Brickmold Trim for ‘Innie’ Windows

first_img This article is only available to GBA Prime Members If you install flanged windows on the exterior side of a sheathed 2×4 or 2×6 wall, and you then install exterior rigid foam, you end up with an “innie” window. Innie windows work well. Before you can install furring strips and siding over the exterior rigid foam, though, you need to come up with exterior trim details (sometimes called “exterior jamb extensions”).Anyone installing innie windows needs to install weather-resistant (and waterproof) details to trim the exterior jambs, the exterior head, and the wide exterior sill. This isn’t impossible, but it’s fussy work that is rarely detailed well. Some builders use solid PVC trim (cellular PVC like Azek); some builders use copper flashing. Almost all builders who come up with site-built details like this end up using peel-and-stick flashing for the tricky spots, covered with some type of durable material to hide the peel-and-stick.During a recent visit to the Cold Climate Housing Research Center (CCHRC) in Fairbanks, Alaska, I saw a wall mockup that displayed an intriguing new way to trim innie windows. Ryan Tinsley, a research scientist at the CCHRC, explained that the trim system was developed (and is now sold) by Northerm Windows of Whitehorse, Yukon. (Capital Glass in Anchorage, Alaska, is a U.S. distributor of Northerm Windows.)One architect who specifies the detail is John Berg of Stantec, an architectural firm in Whitehorse, Yukon. I called Berg on the phone and asked about the use of deep-set brickmold.  “We struggled for at least twenty years with these window details, as more and more insulation was installed on the exterior of the structure and our walls got thicker,” Berg told me.This window mockup at the Cold Climate Housing Research Center shows cutaway versions of vinyl components sold by Northerm Windows. The photo is taken from… Start Free Trial Already a member? Log incenter_img Sign up for a free trial and get instant access to this article as well as GBA’s complete library of premium articles and construction details.last_img read more

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