A matter of sex and belief

first_imgA matter of sex and beliefOn 1 Dec 2002 in Personnel Today Draftregulations on sexual orientation and religion introduces many new areas ofvulnerability for employers. Christopher Mordue offers advice on how to preparefor themThe DTI’s Consultation Paper, Equality and Diversity: The WayAhead, heralds a major overhaul of UK discrimination legislation. Announced on22 October, the proposals are extremely wide ranging and include significantchanges to existing legislation. However, the headline proposal is theintroduction of three new anti-discrimination laws. Proposed legislation on agediscrimination will not be issued until after a consultation paper next year.This article examines the potential impact of draft regulations on sexualorientation and religious discrimination. Currently, no specific legal protection exists in UK law againstdiscrimination on the grounds of sexuality or religious belief. Such claimscould be brought as claims of constructive unfair dismissal or forced to fitwithin the scope of sex or race discrimination respectively. However, gay andlesbian applicants have had little success in bringing claims under the SexDiscrimination Act 1975. The Court of Appeal has refused to equate harassment on the grounds ofsexual orientation with direct sex discrimination. To succeed in such argumentsapplicants have to show that a homosexual employee of a different sex would nothave been subjected to the same treatment. Once such case, Pearce v GoverningBody of Mayfield School, is currently being heard by the House of Lords.Similarly, in Grant v South West Trains Ltd, the European Court of Justicedeclined to decide that an employer’s refusal to extend travel discount to samesex partners amounted to sex discrimination. Nor does the Race Relations Act 1976 afford any straightforward protection againstreligious discrimination. While some religious groups such as Sikhs and Jewshave successfully argued they are distinct ethnic or racial groups, Muslimemployees have had to challenge dress codes and refusals of leave for religiousholidays using the roundabout route of indirect race discrimination, utilisingthe shared beliefs of their racial group as part of the assessment ofdisproportionate impact in terms of race. Same format One obvious impact of the new regulations is that applicants no longer haveto ‘shoehorn’ their cases into existing legislation. Given the affinity between claims of sex and race discrimination and thoseof sexual orientation and religious belief respectively, employers will welcomethe fact that the proposed regulations adopt the same format and (largely) thesame concepts as existing discrimination legislation. A key objective of the DTI’s programme of reform is to ensure greaterconsistency and coherence across the different strands of discriminationlegislation. Unsurprisingly, the new regulations apply to ‘workers’ (ratherthan just ’employees’); they cover recruitment, contractual terms and otherbenefits, training, dismissals and other detriment; and prohibit direct andindirect discrimination, harassment and victimisation. However, there are someimportant new concepts and significant departures from the format of previousanti-discrimination legislation. “Sexual orientation” means “an orientation towards persons ofthe same sex, the opposite sex or persons of the same and opposite sex”or, in layman’s terms, heterosexuality, homosexuality and bisexuality. As aresult, all workers will potentially be able to make claims under theregulations – a straight employee could claim harassment by a gay colleague orboss, and vice versa. The definition of religious discrimination is more controversial. Theregulations do not exhaustively list the religions or faiths which attractprotection. Instead it is deliberately open-ended – “any religion,religious belief, or similar philosophical belief”. The latter part iswide ranging and would include atheism, agnosticism and humanism. One important aspect of the regulations is that they cover discriminationbased on a perception (accurate or not) of an individual’s sexuality or religiousbelief. An employee taunted by their colleagues because of a suspicion theywere homosexual would be able to bring a complaint. In the case of indirect discrimination, the new regulations adopt therevised form of indirect discrimination recently introduced into the SSA. This test differs significantly from the traditional approach. It is nolonger necessary to show discrimination arises from the application of arequirement or condition, which case law had interpreted to mean an absolutebar. It will be sufficient to show a discriminatory “practice, provisionor criteria” – a much looser test. Further, applicants will no longer have to show that a substantially smallerproportion of their particular group can comply with the requirement – an elementwhich in practice required the production of detailed, often complex,statistical evidence of the number of people of different groups who could andcould not comply with the discriminatory rule. Substantial disadvantage Applicants must now show “a substantial disadvantage” comparedwith the comparator group. While statistical evidence may remain important insome cases, tribunals may interpret such statistics less stringently and mayaccept other forms of social and economic expert evidence. Finally, the test of justification is much more stringent – the employermust show that the discriminatory measure is a “proportionate means ofachieving a legitimate aim”, rather than being able to show that thediscrimination is justified on objective grounds. This indirect discrimination test will also be adopted for racediscrimination. The overall effect is that indirect discrimination claims maybecome much more effective as a means of promoting equality and social changethan before. A further key feature of the new rights is the introduction of specificprotection against acts taking place after termination. Typically, cases todate have concerned victimisation and references – for example, the employergiving a bad reference, or sometimes no reference at all, for an employee whohas previously complained of discrimination. While European case law has extended sex discrimination protection to coverpost-termination victimisation, such claims have been consistently rejected inthe context of race and disability discrimination, although the House of Lordswill shortly consider the issue in De Souza v Lambeth Borough Council. The draft regulations prohibit discrimination after the working relationshiphas ended as long as the alleged discriminatory act would have been unlawful ifit had taken place during the working relationship and “arises out of, andis closely connected to, the relevant relationship”. While this clearlycovers references, it may also cover situations such as a job application froma former employee. The DTI Consultation Paper, however, suggests that asituation where one worker harassed a former colleague in a purely socialcontext would not be covered. These new rights clearly create fresh areas of vulnerability for employers.One key risk is that of harassment, either by a line manager or, perhaps, morecommonly, by a colleague. Sex and race harassment claims are alreadysignificant problem areas for employers and no crystal ball is necessary to seethat sexual orientation and religious belief may also prove to be fertile areasfor complaint. Harassment often takes the form of banter, abuse, ridicule oradverse comments about anything which makes one worker different from the norm.Workplace banter In this context, harassment on the grounds of sexual orientation (orperceived sexual orientation) may present the greatest risk – given thathomophobia is still a major issue in society at large. It is also predictablethat many complaints will arise from unwanted speculation or comments about acolleague’s private life and, as with sex discrimination, workplace banter mayeasily cross the line into harassment. Unlike existing discrimination legislation, the regulations create aspecific offence of unlawful harassment. The definition is essentiallyconsistent with existing case law, in that the harassment has to be”unwanted conduct” which has “the purpose or effect of eitherviolating the applicant’s dignity or creating an intimidating, hostile,degrading, humiliating or offensive environment”. While the existence of harassment is judged on all the facts of the case,this includes the victim’s reasonable perception of the effect of thetreatment. One of the principal difficulties in defending harassment claims is that theemployer is vicariously liable for one worker’s acts against another. Whileemployers must be careful to ensure their response to harassment complaints isnot in itself discriminatory – by responding promptly, thoroughly, reasonablyand not penalising employees for raising complaints – they often findthemselves in the unfortunate position where if an act of harassment hasoccurred, they will be liable for it regardless of how well they respond. Toavoid such liability, employers must take all reasonably practicable steps toprevent the unlawful act occurring – tribunals have often shown themselvesreluctant to let employers off the hook, however. Nevertheless, there are a number of practical steps employers can take toput themselves in the best position to defend claims (see Action Points, topright). These involve ensuring that equal opportunities policies and statements(many of which already cover sexuality and religion) are not mere ‘paper’documents, but are given real meaning and effect in the workplace. Recruitment and promotions exercises are also a key area of risk,particularly where religious belief makes it difficult for job applicants tocomply with traditional working hours or with dress codes. Conflicting rights Contracts of employment should also be considered for their potentialdiscriminatory effects, such as rules that prevent workers taking holidays forreligious festivals or the denial of benefits to same sex partners (althoughpension benefits are expressly not covered by the new rules). Where such disparityexists, employers must carefully consider whether the more stringent test forjustification could be met. Workforce monitoring is an important part of ensuring compliance withequality legislation. While a person’s sex and (to a lesser extent) race may berelatively obvious, sexuality or religious belief cannot be so readilyidentified. Employees cannot be forced to provide this information and indeed may bevery reluctant to do so. Even if it is obtained, such information constitutessensitive personal data under the Data Protection Act 1998 and employers musttherefore be careful to obtain the worker’s informed consent to this use. An additional problem is that the new regulations could introduceconflicting rights. One worker’s homosexuality may offend the religious beliefsof a colleague, for instance. This dispute may lead to mutual harassment withthe unfortunate employer facing two or more harassment complaints at the sametime. The regulations and indeed the Government’s consultation documentsprovide no solution to this problem. As ever in the field of discrimination, employers are placed in thefrontline of the battle to change social attitudes and face the dual burden ofboth promoting equality and meeting the liabilities and costs of new employmentrights. Employers should act now to keep ahead of these major developments. Christopher Mordue is an associate at Pinsent Curtis Bidwell Key concepts of discrimination– Direct discrimination Treating employee less favourably than another ongrounds of sexual orientation or religious belief. Applicant must showcomparator (actual or hypothetical) whose circumstances are the same or notmaterially different. No justification defence is available– Indirect discrimination Theapplication of a provision, practice or criteria which applies or would applyequally to persons of a different religious belief or sexual orientation butwhich puts or would put persons of the same religion/belief or sexualorientation at a particular disadvantage when compared with others puts theapplicant at that disadvantage and which the employer cannot show to be aproportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim– Harassment on grounds ofsexuality/belief, X engages in unwanted conduct which has the purpose or effectof either violating Y’s dignity or creating an intimidating hostile degradinghumiliating or offensive environment for Y. Whether this effect is present isto be determined by having regard to all the circumstances including thereasonable perception of Y– Post-termination discrimination It is unlawful todiscriminate against former employee by subjecting them to detriment or toharassment where the discrimination or harassment arises out of and is closelyconnected to the former work relationship– Victimisation Treating the employeeless favourably than the employer would treat another in the same circumstancesbecause the employee has brought proceedings under the regulations, alleged abreach of the regulations, given evidence for another employee, and so forthAction points– Ensure policies and statements gobeyond mere paper commitments– Review equal opportunities policies and statements,harassment procedures and training materials to ensure new forms ofdiscrimination are covered– Train line managers on the new rules and how to spot and dealwith harassment– Train/brief all employees (including new recruits) on theimportance of non-discriminatory behaviour, disciplinary consequences ofharassment and the procedures for raising complaints– Appoint harassment counsellors to act as informal sources ofadvice for employees– Deal firmly and proportionately with harassers, underdisciplinary procedures if appropriate– Review terms and conditions and working practices forpotentially discriminatory issues– Look at ways of celebrating and promoting workplace diversity– Review selection criteria and procedures for recruitment andpromotions. Ensure the criteria used reflect the needs of the job. Traininterviewers on diversity and discrimination issues and ensure they keep a fullwritten record of reasons for decisions– Use the time before the new laws take effect toconduct questionnaires and informal soundings to identify potential areas ofdisputes or harassment. This allows issues to be tackled before employees gaintheir new rights Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Sr. Research Specialist

first_img Sr. Research Specialist Salary Not Specified Faculty Positions Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Share Sr. Research Specialist Twitter LinkedIn Johns Hopkins University You need to sign in or create an account to save Save Sr. Research Specialist School of Medicine -East Baltimore Campus Save Sr. Research Specialist You need to sign in or create an account to save Biotechnology & Bioengineering Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Johns Hopkins University More searches like this Maryland, United States Maryland, United States Administrative Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Similar jobs Salary Not Specified Facebook Salary Not Specified Apply(This will open in a new window from which you will be automatically redirected to an external site after 5 seconds) GeneralSummary/Purpose:The Sr. ResearchSpecialistwill join the researchprogram in our Laboratory focused on HMGA Chromatin Regulators inStem Cell and Cancer Biology at the Johns Hopkins Department ofMedicine to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying HMGAchromatin regulators in cancer and stem cells in a basic andtranslational laboratory. As part of the study team, he/she willcollaborate with the Principal Investigator (PI) to design anddevelop protocols, and oversee study-related activities on severalprojects. With limited supervision by the PI, he/she will designand perform laboratory experiments on independent researchprojects. He/she will: 1) be responsible for developing andorganizing data reports and writing scientific papers resultingfrom the research projects, 2) provide day-day supervision andtrain junior postdoctoral fellows and students on the techniquesand skills needed in the lab, 3) collaborate with the PI inoverseeing the administrative and scientific implementation of theresearch protocols for our research studies. With appropriatedirection by the PI, he/she will function as a leader inmaintaining and circulating research protocols among the programmembers, setting agendas and schedules for routine research-relatedmeetings and other activities, processing laboratory protocols forbasic and translational research projects of our HMGA researchprogram. With guidance from the PI orthe PI’s designee, he/she will also function in capacities requiredfor laboratory function, including ordering reagents or directingour technician to order reagents and conduct experiments. He/shewill assist the principal investigator in organization of thelaboratory and the completion of experiments, and will routinelycommunicate with lab members regarding scientific and otherissues.Specific Duties &Responsibilities:Participate in laboratoryresearch on a comprehensive HMGA research program and develop anddesign research protocols to investigate molecular mechanismsunderlying HMGA1 in cancer and stem cells as well as pursueclinical translation of the laboratoryfindings.With limited guidance by theprincipal investigator (PI), develop and define research projectsand strategies on the HMGA researchprogram.Independently design andperform laboratory experiments for specific HMGA research projectsin the labUse special skills andexpertise to prepare and apply cancer and stem cell, human biospecimens, and animal models to cancer and stem cellresearchUse a variety of laboratorytools, such as cell manipulations, cell inoculation to produceanimal models, molecular genetic tools, Western blotting, PCR,genetic analysis to conduct laboratory cancer and stem cell biologyresearchOrganize, analyze andsummarize the research data to prepare laboratory and scientificmeeting reports on HMGAresearch.Present data atmeetings.Write/draft scientificmanuscripts for publications from the researchprojectsParticipate as a member ofcollaborative group study team in study design and development ofHMGA researchprojects.Help train and supervisejunior postdoctoral fellows and students with the above skills andexpertise for HMGAresearchSuggest ideas for newresearchprojects.Conduct training sessions forjunior personnel and students on theprogram.Works with the PI to prepareand submit annual IRB renewal requests, amendments and adverseevent reports according to IRB requirements for human tissuecollection related to the clinical and translationalresearch.Maintains excellent workingknowledge of all assigned study protocols and reportingrequirements.Coordinates, organize andarrange regular scientific meetings for the team members as needed;prepares agendas, material for, and coordination of meetings withresearchers on the HMGA research program in thelab.Train research staff on jobfunctions and performs quality assurance reviews for the scientificdata.Maintains detailed workingknowledge ofprotocolsDesigns spreadsheets anddatabases for tracking and management of researchdataPerform statistical analyseson research data using standard statisticalsoftwarePerforms literature searchesfor presentations andpublicationsEnsures accuracy andtimeliness of datacollection.Interacts regularly withmembers of the research team regarding data management and thestatus and progress of ongoingstudies.Data entry and managementusing database and other computersoftwareTrack and assess quality ofdata entry andabstraction.Meets regularly with the PIand other senior members of the team to discuss study progress.Participates in all mandatory meetings of the research program andhelps to prepare material for thesemeetings.Prepares reports as requiredby the principal investigators and senior scientists on theprogram. Is highly experienced and knowledgeable and complies withall standard laboratory research protocols, regulations, andpolicies; may instruct introductory level research personnel inthese guidelines andpoliciesThe specialist should befamiliar with PC andMacintosh computersand standard computer software, including the Microsoft Officepackage and Adobe Acrobat and Photoshop. He or she will help topurchase new laboratory computers and interact with our ITdepartment to ensure that computers and printers arefunctioning.Although not a requirement, familiarity with HTML andiWeb to keep up the lab website is aplus.The specialist will help toorder or oversee orderingreagents;experiencewith the HopkinsOne system and ordering from the JHU CORE store,JHU Supply Store, and external vendors is a plus. This will requiremonitoring inventory levels of materials and supplies, as well ascommunication with and knowledge of relevant vendors. In addition,he or she will process invoices for services received. Properhandling and organization of paperwork is required to ensure thatlaboratory spending is constrained to budgetarylimits.Will be responsible for the composition of standardlaboratory protocols andhe or she will assist in thecompletion and submission of grants, IRB and ISCROapplications.The specialist will beresponsible for completing renewal of registrations pertaining torecombinant DNA, human tissue and pathogens, and for amending andrenewing the animal care and use agreements. He/she will alsoparticipate in data interpretation, training staff and fellows,training researchers from collaborating laboratories, and proofingscientific papers and grant applications. He or she will alsoensure that new staff and students have completed all relevantHIPAA, biosafety and animaltraining.The Sr. Research Specialistwill monitor equipment performance and maintenance, and beresponsible for scheduling repairs and renewing service contractswhen necessary. He/she will be responsible for maintenance ofequipment shared across several laboratories. Duties includemanaging and developing an appropriate invoicing and billingprocess related to use of equipment, if applicable. The specialistwill also train new users, and assist with usage when needed.He/she will be responsible for scheduling preventative maintenanceand keeping the systems in working order, as well as addressing andtroubleshooting anyproblems.Assist the principalinvestigator and other investigators in our group with laboratoryorganization and completion ofexperimentsCommunicate laboratory issueswith personnel in a timelymanner.Help with experimentsinvolving the shared flow cytometer and cell imagingsystems.Train new users for theshared FACS and cell imagingsystem.Help to invoice for theshared system usage, maintain a database of spending and budgetinformation, process and pay invoices for outside laboratoryservices.Direct our technician toschedule maintenance, repairand certification of laboratoryequipment.Compose protocols forlaboratoryprocesses.Renew and amend animal careand useprotocols.Renew biosafetyregistrations.Keep the laboratory preparedfor safetyinspections.Assist in the completion ofgrants, IRB and ISCROapplications.Minimum Qualifications(mandatory):Bachelor’s degree in biology,chemistry, or other related sciencerequired.Minimum of four years ofexperience in a comparable laboratory, performing relevanttechniques.Master’s degree, with relatedgraduate research, may substitute for experience to the extentpermitted by the JHU equivalencyformula***.PreferredQualifications:Master’s degree and/or 2-10years of experience in a comparable laboratory performing relevanttechniques, coupled with knowledge of biological sciences,molecular biology, orchemistry.Special Knowledge, Skills,andAbilities:Able to perform scientificresearch through conducing laboratory experiments using a varietyof techniques, such as cell culture, microscopy, DNA extraction,PCR, Western blotting, tumor animal procedures, andothers.Knowledge of basic andtranslational research and principles required, particularly incancer and stem cellresearch.Proficiency in the use ofsoftware applications, databases, spreadsheets, and word processingrequired.Excellent organizational,attention to detail, and time management skillsrequired.Actual strong researchexperience isrequired.Able to manage multiple andcompetingpriorities.Have excellent communicationskills.Skills and expertise inhandling special pulmonary hypertension cell lines and developingpulmonary hypertension animalmodels.Any Specific PhysicalRequirements for theJob:Sitting in a normal seatedposition for extended periods oftimeReaching by extending hand(s)or arm(s) in anydirectionFinger dexterity tomanipulate objects with fingers rather than with whole hand or arm,for example, using akeyboard.Communication skills usingthe spokenword.Ability to see within normalparametersAbility to hear within normalrangesAbility to moveabout***JHU EquivalencyFormula: 18 graduate degree creditsmay substitute for one year of experience. For jobs whereequivalency is permitted, up to two years of non-related collegecourse work may be applied towards the total minimumeducation/experience required for the respectivejob.Classified Title:Sr. ResearchSpecialistWorking Title: Sr. ResearchSpecialist ​​​​​Role/Level/Range: ACRP/04/MC Starting Salary Range:$45,195-$62,225 (commensuratewith experience)Employee group: Full Time Schedule: Monday-Friday/8:30am-5:00pm Exempt Status: ExemptLocation: 04-MD:School of Medicine Campus Department name: 10002811-SOM DOM Hematology Personnel area: School of MedicineThe successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject toa pre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply dependingon which campus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www.eeoc.gov/sites/default/files/migrated_files/employers/poster_screen_reader_optimized.pdf Johns Hopkins University Science, Technology & Mathematics Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimore Maryland, United States Save Sr. Research Specialist II The successful candidate(s) for this position will be subject to apre-employment background check.If you are interested in applying for employment with The JohnsHopkins University and require special assistance or accommodationduring any part of the pre-employment process, please contact theHR Business Services Office at [email protected] For TTYusers, call via Maryland Relay or dial 711.The following additional provisions may apply depending on whichcampus you will work. Your recruiter will adviseaccordingly.During the Influenza (“the flu”) season, as a condition ofemployment, The Johns Hopkins Institutions require all employeeswho provide ongoing services to patients or work in patient care orclinical care areas to have an annual influenza vaccination orpossess an approved medical or religious exception. Failure to meetthis requirement may result in termination of employment.The pre-employment physical for positions in clinical areas,laboratories, working with research subjects, or involvingcommunity contact requires documentation of immune status againstRubella (German measles), Rubeola (Measles), Mumps, Varicella(chickenpox), Hepatitis B and documentation of having received theTdap (Tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis) vaccination. This may includedocumentation of having two (2) MMR vaccines; two (2) Varicellavaccines; or antibody status to these diseases from laboratorytesting. Blood tests for immunities to these diseases areordinarily included in the pre-employment physical exam except forthose employees who provide results of blood tests or immunizationdocumentation from their own health care providers. Anyvaccinations required for these diseases will be given at no costin our Occupational Health office.Equal Opportunity EmployerNote: Job Postings are updated daily and remain online untilfilled.EEO is the LawLearn more:https://www1.eeoc.gov/employers/upload/eeoc_self_print_poster.pdfImportant legal informationhttp://hrnt.jhu.edu/legal.cfm Sr. Research Specialist II You need to sign in or create an account to save Academic Affairs Not specified Full Time jobs in Baltimorelast_img read more

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Dr Stephen Michael Monasingh,10th Dan Grandmaster,passes on

first_imgHE was considered by many to be one of the most,if not the most recognisable and respectable figure in martial arts in Guyana, but Professor Dr. Stephen Michael Monasingh, a 10th Dan Grandmaster,was also a hero.Grandmaster Monasingh passed away on Thursday April 27 after a brief period of illness. He was 67 years old.For over 50 years, Dr. Monasingh was involved in Martial Arts, during which time he was given a Doctorate in Oriental Medicine as well as being internationally acclaimed.Professor Monasingh devolved a style called ‘Shin Kaido’ a blend of Jujitsu, Karate, Judo, Taekwondo and Aikido.The 10th Dan Grandmaster, during the 1960’s to the 1980’s,represented Guyana at the Japan-based International Karate Organisation. Dr. Monasingh also sat at the helm of the organisation in Guyana for a number of years.Apart from leading the Guyana Taekwondo Association, the world renowned Grandmaster, Professor and doctor also worked at the Brazilian Embassy as the Aide to the Military Attaché.last_img read more

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