Amber Alert issued for 3-year-old girl allegedly abducted by woman in NC: Police

first_imgGreensboro Police Dept.(GREENSBORO, N.C.) — An Amber Alert has been issued for a 3-year-old girl who was reported abducted in North Carolina Wednesday, allegedly taken by a woman in her 20s, authorities said.Ahlora Ashanti Sample Lindiment was reported abducted at 6:33 p.m. Wednesday from the Phillips Avenue area in Greensboro, the Greensboro Police Department said.The 3-year-old was taken from a playground, reported ABC Raleigh station WTVD.“We are still in the process of developing information on the possible abductor and will be updating information throughout the day,” Greensboro Police spokesman Ronald Glenn told ABC News Thursday morning. “We have had resources working throughout the night continuing to gather information.”Ahlora’s mother, Erica Lindiment, is pleading with the public to help.“Even if you don’t want to be known, or you don’t want to have your name or anything to do with it, you can always leave an anonymous tip,” she told WTVD. “Help us find her and make sure she gets home safe.”Ahlora was last seen wearing a short sleeve pink T-shirt, black jeans and possibly white sandals, said police.The suspect is described as a black woman in her 20s who stands at 5 feet 6 inches tall and weighs about 135 pounds, said police. Her hair was in a short ponytail and she was wearing a short-sleeve black crop top with black pants with tiger print faces on them.Anyone with information is asked to call 911 or the Greensboro Police Department at 336-373-2287.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Scoreboard roundup — 2/14/19

first_img Written by FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailiStock(NEW YORK) — Here are the scores from Thursday’s sports events:NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONOrlando 127, Charlotte 89N.Y. Knicks 106, Atlanta 91New Orleans 131, Oklahoma City 122NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUEN.Y. Islanders 3, Columbus 0SO Florida 3, Calgary 2Detroit 3, Ottawa 2Tampa Bay 6, Dallas 0Colorado 4, Winnipeg 1Nashville 3, Montreal 1Chicago 5, New Jersey 2St. Louis 4, Arizona 0Toronto 6, Vegas 3SO Vancouver 4, L.A. Kings 3Washington 5, San Jose 1TOP-25 COLLEGE BASKETBALL(3) Gonzaga 73, Loyola Marymount 60(9) Houston 71, UConn 63Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. February 15, 2019 /Sports News – National Scoreboard roundup — 2/14/19center_img Beau Lundlast_img

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DONOVAN, JOAN M.

first_img82, of Wall, NJ, formerly of Bayonne, died March 4, 2017 at Sunnyside Manor in Wall. Born and raised in Bayonne, Joan was a lifelong resident. Joan was a parishioner of St. Vincent’s Church. Joan was predeceased by her husband Matthew T. Donovan in 2010, their daughter Kathy Campbell in 2013, a sister Margaret Mulkern and a brother William Spirko. Surviving are her son Matthew Donovan and his wife Meghan of Wall and her daughter Keri O’Brien of Bayonne. Joan had 10 grandchildren; Johnny and Sarah O’Brien, Dan, Ryan, Sean, Michael and Patrick Campbell, Matthew, Luke and Jude Donovan. She also leaves 4 great grandchildren and several nieces, nephews and cousins. Flowers may be sent or donations may be made to Kathy’s Kids Foundation at www.kathykidsfoundation.org. Funeral arrangements by O’BRIEN Funeral Home, 2028 Hwy 35 at New Bedford Rd., Wall.last_img read more

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Gov’t Mule Announces 2019 Red Rocks Show With Ryan Bingham

first_imgGov’t Mule is headed back to Colorado’s Red Rocks Amphitheatre this summer, as the popular rock band has announced their forthcoming show at the outdoor venue set for August 18th. The band will be joined in support by Ryan Bingham.Related: Gov’t Mule Shares Pro-Shot Footage Of “Life Before Insanity” From Capitol Theatre Concert FilmThe August 18th show acts as the latest addition to the Mule’s ongoing spring and summer tour schedule. That schedule also includes their announced late-night set in honor of the 50th anniversary of Woodstock, to take place at Mountain Jam‘s 2019 event. More recently, the band announced the forthcoming release of a new concert film and live album, Bring On The Music – Live At The Capitol Theatre, which is set for a June 28th release via Provogue/Mascot Label Group.Pre-sale tickets and VIP packages for the 2019 Gov’t Mule Red Rocks concert go on sale tomorrow, Wednesday, May 29th, beginning at 10 a.m. MST. Tickets for the general public will follow on Friday, May 31st at 10 a.m. MST. Until then, fans can revisit Gov’t Mule’s last performance at Red Rocks with their three-set, six-plus-hour super show in 2018.Head to the band’s website for tickets and info.last_img read more

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Tough love between U.S., Pakistan

first_imgThe foreign minister of Pakistan had a blunt message for the United States: No matter how much aid you give us, if you do not respect Pakistan’s sovereignty, if you launch unmanned drone attacks over the border into our territory, you risk alienating your most important ally against Middle Eastern terrorism.“In the battle for the hearts and minds of the people of Pakistan, Kerry-Lugar [a Senate bill that tripled relief to Pakistan] is one step forward,” said Makhdoom Shah Mahmood Qureshi during an address at the John F. Kennedy Jr. Forum at the Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) on Monday (Oct. 18). “Massive flood relief is one step forward. But drone and helicopter attacks on our territory and people is two steps back.”At times stern but also respectful and even hopeful about the future, Qureshi sketched a blueprint for strengthening America’s relationship with Pakistan.This is vital for both countries, Qureshi emphasized. As R. Nicholas Burns, professor of the practice of diplomacy and international politics at HKS, said in introducing Qureshi: “Of the 192 member states of the United Nations, no country is more important to our country — to global peace and security — than Pakistan.”The two countries “have a strong friendship and a long friendship, but it is also a complex friendship, not without its misunderstandings, disagreements, and strategic dilemmas,” Burns said.Americans need only look back to 1989 to understand why Pakistanis have a deep distrust of U.S. commitment, said Qureshi, who was in the United States for the third meeting of the U.S.-Pakistan Strategic Dialogue, to be held in Washington with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. In 1989, the Soviet Union withdrew from its occupation of Afghanistan, driven in part by guerrilla mujahideen forces funded by the United States.“The United States, victorious, left on the next bus,” he said. The radicalization and extremism that followed “was neither unexpected nor unpredicted.”Benazir Bhutto, the slain opposition leader, warned the first President Bush about the mujahideen, who became the springboard for the Taliban and al-Qaeda, Qureshi said. “I’m afraid we have created a Frankenstein that will come back to haunt us someday,” Bhutto told Bush.“Washington has fallen in love with every Pakistani military dictator and done little to help elected civilian governments solve the country’s economic problems,” said Qureshi, whose long political and public service career includes acting as spokesman for Bhutto in 1996.Thus, “The people of Pakistan see a half of century of evidence of the U.S. dancing with dictators who subverted human rights, using our people and our soldiers as surrogates in proxy wars.”Qureshi, the foreign minister since March 2008, said Pakistan remains a vibrant, energetic country — with democratic elections and a “robust and boisterous” media — despite massive floods that put one-fifth of the country under water.Economic aid from the United States eases the threat of terrorism. “If there were factory jobs for young people they would be less vulnerable to inducement from radicals and terrorists.” But Europe and America also must open their markets to Pakistan’s goods and services. “We need trade, not just aid,” Qureshi said.The United States must also help to ease tension between India and Pakistan by helping to resolve disputes over the Kashmir region, he said. And, most importantly, Washington must hold off on unmanned drone attacks and helicopter assaults in Pakistan territory, which infuriate the population.Polls now show “an overwhelming majority of Pakistanis consider America not a friend but, rather embarrassingly, the enemy. … This is the mind-set that we have to reverse,” said Qureshi. He underscored his commitment to doing just that, even though it has required him at times to stick “out my political neck.”During the question-and-answer period, Qureshi was pressed on why Iran should not have nuclear weapons when Pakistan does. He insisted that Pakistan faced a real threat from India, whereas “I don’t see any immediate threats to Iran.”Asked about the relationship with India, he acknowledged that tensions run high and that “we can’t wish them away. We have to address them — the sooner the better for the region.” The two countries face a common enemy in the form of radical terrorism and, despite jingoistic voices on both sides, “there is a new generation taking control on both sides,” he said.Qureshi’s appearance was co-sponsored by the India and South Asia Program and the Future of Diplomacy Project.last_img read more

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Art in the making

first_imgWith a major renovation limiting exhibition space, the Harvard Art Museums can’t always show off new acquisitions these days.One example is a fragile plaster model — 34 inches high — that is a rare survivor from the rough-and-tumble sculpture studios of 17th century Italy, where new sculptures were made and ancient classical works were restored from fragments dug from the ground. Young artists often learned their trade by piecing these remnants together.Restorations required making plaster models, three-dimensional representations of what a finished work might look like. They were just templates of a sort, and were discarded once a sculpture was finished.But the half-scale example somehow survived and was donated to Harvard last year by the estate of First Amendment lawyer Daniel Paul ’46, a one-time member of the Harvard Board of Overseers who had a passion for collecting fine art. (He also earned degrees from Harvard Law School and from what became the Harvard Kennedy School.)The survival alone of such a fragile artifact makes it rare. But what makes Harvard’s model even more important is the figure it depicts: the Barberini Faun (circa 220 B.C.), one of the key works of Hellenist sculpture in the canon of Western art.The original, a life-size marble statue on display in Munich since 1830, shows a reclining, naked faun — in Greek mythology, a satyr — in what one critic called “the relaxed abandonment of sleep,” with legs akimbo, and one arm crooked behind a head wild with curls.That abandonment includes a full frontal view of the faun, a pose that has since made the statue an icon in homoerotic art. The same legs-apart view also assured that for years the Barberini Faun appeared in art textbooks only as a detail of a handsome, relaxed face.Stephan Wolohojian was shocked when he saw the original, in Munich’s Glyptothek museum. The blatant naked pose was part of the shock, he said, but so was the naturalistic beauty of the statute’s musculature and “the seductive trance of the sleeping faun” itself.Wolohojian is the Landon and Lavinia Clay Curator, and head of the division of European and American Art at the Harvard Art Museums. He delivered a talk on the Faun plaster model this month (Dec. 8) at the Arthur M. Sackler Museum lecture hall.It was the second of four In-Sight Evenings at the Art Museums, in which patrons are invited to an after-hours reception and then talk that looks “deeper and differently” at a single artist or work of art.The story of the plaster model starts with the story of the Barberini Faun itself, which in the 1620s was excavated in Rome. More than a thousand years before, it had likely been among the tons of statuary hurled at invading Goths from the heights of the besieged Castel Sant’Angelo, a papal fortress. In ancient times the fortress had been the mausoleum of the Roman emperor Hadrian, an ardent Hellenophile who scoured the empire for Greek statuary.When it was dug out of the old moat, the Faun was missing its right leg and left arm, as well as fragments of the face, hand, and elbow. By 1627 it was in the possession of Cardinal Francesco Barberini, a cousin of Pope Urban VIII, an arts patron who himself was a Barberini.By 1629, marble had been purchased for a restoration. A 1679 letter refers to “making two legs in stucco and plaster,” and by 1692 another Barberini inventory refers to a sitting, sleeping Faun, and a plaster model.All the evidence points to the Harvard model being “a working model,” said Wolohojian, and not a cast for reproduction. It was the kind of working object made of clay, rope, and other handy material that “rarely survived in a chaotic sculptor’s studio,” he said. “This plaster is a rare and precious survivor.”Such models, of course, were never presented to large audiences, said Wolohojian. So the Harvard example, complete with a piece of bone inside used to strengthen the right leg, is a window onto restoration work of centuries past.The Harvard Art Museums own a similar artifact — a low-fired clay model of St. Longinus (1628) that has been in the collection since 1937. It is by Gian Lorenzo Bernini, a favorite of Pope Urban VIII and the leading sculptor and architect of his day. (He designed the Piazza San Pietro in front of St. Peter’s in Rome, as well as the interior of the Basilica. His “Apollo and Daphne” and other works have been widely admired for almost four centuries.)“It would please me to think … that there was a Bernini intervention” in restoring the Barberini Faun, said Wolohojian, but there is no evidence of it.The original was “the envy of popes and princes,” he said, and it underwent serial restorations. A full-scale marble copy done in Rome in 1726 shows the restored right leg in an upright position, as it appears in the Harvard model.But the most famous restoration — by Italian sculptor Vincenzo Pacetti, in 1799 — replaced the right leg once again, skewing it outward to expose the buttocks more dramatically.The Pacetti restoration also “imposed the single frontal viewpoint,” said Wolohojian, an imposition of artistic design that today would be called a “mutilation.”But that was the business of restoration in 17th and 18th century Italy, when sculptors had a virtual license to rework classical fragments as they saw fit, he said. “Artists felt a certain freedom, a certain liberty to respond” to the materials in front of them.Such manipulations were “clearly acceptable” to audiences a few centuries ago, said Wolohojian. Fragments of ancient marbles were sought out to make modern works, he said, and restorers would often integrate fragments of old sculpture to make new ones, like using parts from a bin.Today, “most of us admire classical marbles” on display, often without considering what restorers just a few centuries ago might have done with their “unions of ancient fragments.”After a brief round of questions, Wolohojian invited the audience to ask more “over some wine” at the reception following the lecture. “Appropriate,” he added, “for thinking about a satyr.”The topic of the next In-Sight Evening, at 6 p.m. March 9 at the Arthur M. Sackler Museum, 485 Broadway, is the statue of Meleager. This stunning fragment of heroic Greek sculpture has been on display at Harvard since 1899.  For more information.last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s celebrates Heritage Week

first_imgSaint Mary’s College plans to celebrate its history and the 50th anniversary of the death of Sister Madeleva Wolff, the third president of Saint Mary’s, during next week’s Heritage Week festivities, senior Mollie Valencia said.Valencia, student director on the Alumnae Association Board of Directors, said many of the Heritage Week events would be centered around Sister Madeleva and the mark she left on the college.Junior Sarah Prezek, chair of the Mission Committee for Student Government Association said she worked with Valencia to plan the Heritage Week events.“One of the most important goals of this week is to connect Saint Mary’s women to the women that founded and continually support our college, the Sisters of the Holy Cross convent,” Prezek said.Valencia said Sister Eva Mary Hooker, professor of English, and John Kovach, library archivist, would host a reading Sunday of Wolff’s work at 2 p.m. in the Student Center Lounge.Riedinger House, the guesthouse on campus, would also host two tea parties Monday, Valencia said. She said students could attend an update on the capital campaign Saint Mary’s launched last year Tuesday in the Vander Vennett Theater.Valencia said it is important for students to understand how deeply Saint Mary’s was rooted in history and how much of that history could be found all across the campus, even in less-frequented areas.“There are so many different places on campus that most students do not know about, and these are the places highlighted during Heritage Week,” she said.To showcase some of this Saint Mary’s history, Sister Veronique Wiedower, vice president for mission, would lead Heritage Room tours Wednesday, Valencia said. She said students could also visit the college archives for tours Wednesday.Valencia said Saint Mary’s President Carol Ann Mooney would have dinner with juniors and seniors in Stapleton Lounge on Thursday.“This dinner will allow students to dine family-style, similar to the type of dinner that was traditionally served when Reignbeaux Lounge served as the school’s dining hall,” Prezek said.Prezek said long-sleeved T-shirts would be given out at each event, but she said she hopes that student choose to attend the events to learn more about the history of the college.“The events are important to attend because each event sheds a light on aspects of Saint Mary’s that makes it unique and beloved,” Prezek said. “Students are given an opportunity to learn about and experience Saint Mary’s history and traditions.”Tags: Carol Ann Mooney, Heritage Week, history, Saint Mary’s Collegelast_img read more

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Faculty seeks to increase diversity

first_imgEric Richelsen For Pamela Nolan Young, Notre Dame’s new director of academic diversity and inclusion, cultivating a diverse faculty is essential for any university.“There are lots of scholarly articles and research that point to the benefit of having a diverse faculty and student body — and staff, I would include professional staff in that as well,” Young said. “And some of them are very obvious. When you have different perspectives addressing the same issue, you have more enriched conversations. When you have different perspectives addressing scientific research, you approach that research differently. You’re able to be more creative and think about some of the solutions that you might propose.”In her role in the provost’s office, Young said four components — recruitment, retention, development and communication — work to increase faculty diversity.Jason Ruiz, an associate professor of American studies, said faculty diversity plays a central role in providing a well-rounded education.“I think our job as a University is to expose students to the diversity of the human experience across the disciplines,” Ruiz said. “In order to do that, you need a diverse faculty.”According to the most recent statistics from Notre Dame’s office of Institutional Research, as of 2011, U.S. minorities comprised 15 percent of Notre Dame’s faculty. This figure places the University 4.2 percent below the median for Association of American Universities (AAU) institutions. According to statistics from the National Center for Education Statistics, as of 2013, 21 percent of all full-time higher education faculty members were black, Hispanic or Asian/Pacific Islander.Despite the University’s relative lack of faculty diversity, professor of political science Darren Davis said the issue is not unique to Notre Dame.“I think the most important thing is for people to understand that although the numbers are low, these things are not unique to Notre Dame,” Davis said. “Other schools are in similar situations, and because of that, I don’t think there’s anything to be ashamed of. Because, relatively speaking, every other university is in the same situation. … So it’s an issue, but it’s not endemic to the culture at Notre Dame.“… It’s no different from many other universities,” Davis said. “There’s not anything unique to Notre Dame that makes it inhospitable to minority candidates.”Young, who has held similar diversity and inclusion positions at Smith College, North Shore Community College and in the private sector, said all colleges and universities grapple with similar issues.“Diversity and inclusion is difficult for every higher education institution,” she said. “Even those institutions that feel like they’re doing very well or feel that it’s very easy for them to attract top talent — so Harvard or Stanford or the University of Chicago — are all striving to do better.”Several factors present barriers to Notre Dame building a more diverse faculty, Davis said.“The first reason is that there are not many [minority] Ph.D.s to begin with,” he said. “So, if you look at the various disciplines, you don’t normally see a lot of minorities with Ph.D.s who are also interested in going into academia.”Ruiz said the overall lack of minority representation in higher education is a historical problem.“It’s definitely a product of history, including the ways in which institutions of higher education excluded non-white people for the vast majority of their histories,” he said. “Things have changed dramatically for undergraduate students and admission and recruitment, but, at the graduate level, we still see tremendous disparities in a variety of fields.”Davis also said Notre Dame’s high academic standing places it in a competitive market for all faculty, including minorities.“Many schools like a Notre Dame are interested in hiring people who will be successful, academics who will be successful,” he said. “So that means there are many other universities and colleges like Notre Dame who are competing for those candidates as well.”Ruiz said Notre Dame’s physical location may also prevent some minority faculty members from coming here.“I think one of the problems I hear again and again about Notre Dame when we’re hiring is location,” he said. “There’s a sense that South Bend is going to be a difficult sell for super strong minority faculty members who have opportunities to work in big cities, on the coasts.”These barriers, and more, may make it seem as if Notre Dame is in a bleak situation for faculty diversity, professor of political science and Africana studies Diane Pinderhughes said.“It’s hard to have confidence,” Pinderhughes said. “There’s more communication about the University’s commitment to diversity in the past year or so. … But when I think around the campus about the numbers and the progress [minority] people are making through the tenure ranks and the numbers of people and the fact that there’s not consistently a range of full professors or professors with chairs in the University, this is a problem. There are also very few African Americans in higher administrative levels.”Still, Ruiz said Notre Dame fosters faculty diversity in some fields, while others need more attention.“For Latinos, Notre Dame is considered a great place,” he said. “We have a relatively strong number of Latino faculty members and faculty members who do Latino studies. I think other ethnic studies are more obviously underrepresented among the faculty, especially African American faculty members and anyone interested in doing Asian American studies and American Indian studies.”In order to increase faculty diversity, Ruiz said he would advocate for “cluster hiring.”“My number one thing I think Notre Dame could do to increase faculty diversity would be to engage in cluster hiring,” he said. “I’ve seen other schools have tremendous success in hiring not one faculty member who does Asian American Studies, but hire seven across a wide array of disciplines, so a psychologist, an American studies person, a sociologist and a historian, all of whom are interested in the Asian American experience.”Ruiz said this practice would immediately impact recruitment, but also aid in retention efforts for minority faculty members.“I think the philosophy of the cluster hire is that people come in as cohorts who have similar backgrounds and are interested in similar intellectual questions and, therefore, feel more grounded here,” he said. “Because one thing that’s really hard as a faculty member is to be the only person on a campus from your background and to be the only person who does that type of work. You’re alone. You’re a lone wolf. It’s hard to see yourself represented here when you’re one of one. I think cluster hiring is the number one thing that could have immediate and dramatic impact on faculty diversity.”Davis said in order to generate a more diverse faculty, Notre Dame should emphasize its unique aspects, including its Catholic identity.“Our unique Catholic identity is and should be highly attractive,” Davis said. “Our focus on social justice, Catholic social teaching and being an inclusive community should be attractive — particularly attractive to minority candidates, not just Catholics, but across the board. That is something that intrigued me and convinced me to come here.”Highlighting these attributes that separate Notre Dame from peer institutions would help the University succeed in the competitive faculty market, Davis said.“The way that I see Notre Dame is we’re in a competitive market for the best faculty we can get,” he said.“Everyone is after them — everyone. And we have to figure out what we do better than other similarly situated universities.“Notre Dame is not the only with resources. Notre Dame is not the only place with a long sports tradition. Notre Dame is not the only place where you can go and have good colleagues. So we have to think about, in my opinion, what separates us from aspirational peers who are similarly situated economically and intellectually.”And while Young, who began her job earlier this month, said her brief time in the new position has prevented her from fully formulating recruitment and retention strategies, more effective communication will advance the mission of increasing faculty diversity.“When I interviewed for the job, someone said to me that the University tends to be very modest and that they’re not in the habit of advertising and boasting about their activities,” she said. “And this is an area where to attract top talent, they have to know and see that there is a commitment and that you’re already involved in doing the work. And so it requires a very public presence about your deliberate actions, and I think that’s one think I’ll try to encourage the University to do differently — to make known what’s currently happening on campus more prominent.”Ultimately, Young said, increasing faculty diversity will benefit all members of the Notre Dame community.“Oftentimes, individuals think about diversity and inclusion as an aside or an add-on,” she said. “The practices and changes that will come about based on my work, if they come into fruition, will help every faculty member on campus.”Tags: Darren Davis, Diane Pinderhughes, Diversity, Diversity and Inclusion, faculty, Jason Ruiz, pamela nolan younglast_img read more

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Clifton Beach remains a quiet family favourite

first_imgClifton Beach resident Rod Baird. Picture: Marc McCormackWITH its serene shoreline and proximity to trendy tourist hubs, Clifton Beach is a quiet achiever of the northern suburbs.Matt Graham has lived at the suburb for more than 30 years and couldn’t have imagined a more idyllic childhood.“We lived one street off the beach and would be fishing just about every day,” he said.“It is a bit different now – there is more hustle and bustle – but it’s still not as busy as other parts.”For 20 years he has worked at Bransford’s Tackle Shop, near the Clifton Village Shopping Centre.Mr Graham was now looking forward to showing his young daughter some of the suburb’s top fishing spots.About 20km north of the CBD, Clifton Beach is bordered to the west by Kuranda National Park. “I only ever go into Cairns if I absolutely need to,” Mr Graham said. A path connecting the suburb to Palm Cove has made Clifton Beach popular for exercise enthusiasts. More from newsCairns home ticks popular internet search terms3 days agoTen auction results from ‘active’ weekend in Cairns3 days agoWalks along the beach are made even more relaxing by swaying palm trees and views to Double Island. According to Cairns Regional Council, Clifton Beach was named after Clifton in Scotland – the birthplace of one of the area’s European settlers, Mary Hunter Smart.The average house price is hovering about $500,000, just below the nearby Palm Cove, with the median unit price about $280,000.In 2014 a four-bedroom manor on Arlington Esplanade, Clifton Beach, sold for a mammoth $1.72 million. Another mansion, at 34-36 Alexandra St, is currently listed for $1.195 million.Keith and Lily Schirmer have lived in Thetford Close for 21 enjoyable years after moving to Clifton Beach from Port Douglas.“It’s very quiet here. We live in a cul-de-sac and all our neighbours are extremely friendly,” Mrs Schirmer said. “We found the area wasn’t particularly touristy, which suited our needs.“It has changed quite a lot from when we arrived, but we still really enjoy it here.”last_img read more

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