About 137 women killed by someone they knew every day in 2017: UN report

first_imgiStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) — More than half of the approximately 87,000 women killed in 2017 died at the hands of intimate partners or family members, according to a report released Sunday by the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime.Some 50,000 were killed globally by someone they knew, the organization estimated.That works out to 137 per day — nearly six every hour.“While the vast majority of homicide victims are men, women continue to pay the highest price as a result of gender inequality, discrimination and negative stereotypes,” UNODC Executive Director Yury Fedotov said in a statement that accompanied the report. “They are also the most likely to be killed by intimate partners and family.”The study was released to coincide with the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.“Targeted criminal justice responses are needed to prevent and end gender-related killings,” Fedotov added.Women in Africa and the Americas are most at risk of being killed by those they know, the data show.While the global rate of female homicide victims is about 1.3 per 100,000, it’s 3.1 in Africa and 1.6 in the Americas. In Asia, it’s 0.9, and in Europe, the lowest reported, it’s 0.7.Despite legislation enacted and programs developed to help curb violence against women by those closest to them, “tangible progress,” the organization said in its statement, “has not been made in recent years.” Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Men and women swap traditional workplace roles

first_img The number of women business and financial professionals has surged by 41,000 in the last three years – a rise of 61 per cent.Companies are also recruiting increasing numbers of male receptionists as a report into the latest employment trends reveals a narrowing of the gender gap within some occupations.Women also have a larger presence in IT, with figures for female computer analysts and programmers rising by 30 per cent.The number of male receptionists and telephonists has gone up by 56 per cent.The report, Employment Now – 1 million more people in work, was launched by Employment Minister Tessa Jowell at the TUC conference in Glasgow last week.It revealed there are more women in the workforce than ever before. The employment of women has grown by 4.2 per cent compared with 3.5 per cent among men.Employment levels in childcare and related occupations showed larger increases than any other group, although the highest percentage growth was in sales jobs.Jowell said, “There are now around a million people in Britain employed in jobs based on information and communication technology.” Previous Article Next Article Men and women swap traditional workplace rolesOn 19 Sep 2000 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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A matter of sex and belief

first_imgA matter of sex and beliefOn 1 Dec 2002 in Personnel Today Draftregulations on sexual orientation and religion introduces many new areas ofvulnerability for employers. Christopher Mordue offers advice on how to preparefor themThe DTI’s Consultation Paper, Equality and Diversity: The WayAhead, heralds a major overhaul of UK discrimination legislation. Announced on22 October, the proposals are extremely wide ranging and include significantchanges to existing legislation. However, the headline proposal is theintroduction of three new anti-discrimination laws. Proposed legislation on agediscrimination will not be issued until after a consultation paper next year.This article examines the potential impact of draft regulations on sexualorientation and religious discrimination. Currently, no specific legal protection exists in UK law againstdiscrimination on the grounds of sexuality or religious belief. Such claimscould be brought as claims of constructive unfair dismissal or forced to fitwithin the scope of sex or race discrimination respectively. However, gay andlesbian applicants have had little success in bringing claims under the SexDiscrimination Act 1975. The Court of Appeal has refused to equate harassment on the grounds ofsexual orientation with direct sex discrimination. To succeed in such argumentsapplicants have to show that a homosexual employee of a different sex would nothave been subjected to the same treatment. Once such case, Pearce v GoverningBody of Mayfield School, is currently being heard by the House of Lords.Similarly, in Grant v South West Trains Ltd, the European Court of Justicedeclined to decide that an employer’s refusal to extend travel discount to samesex partners amounted to sex discrimination. Nor does the Race Relations Act 1976 afford any straightforward protection againstreligious discrimination. While some religious groups such as Sikhs and Jewshave successfully argued they are distinct ethnic or racial groups, Muslimemployees have had to challenge dress codes and refusals of leave for religiousholidays using the roundabout route of indirect race discrimination, utilisingthe shared beliefs of their racial group as part of the assessment ofdisproportionate impact in terms of race. Same format One obvious impact of the new regulations is that applicants no longer haveto ‘shoehorn’ their cases into existing legislation. Given the affinity between claims of sex and race discrimination and thoseof sexual orientation and religious belief respectively, employers will welcomethe fact that the proposed regulations adopt the same format and (largely) thesame concepts as existing discrimination legislation. A key objective of the DTI’s programme of reform is to ensure greaterconsistency and coherence across the different strands of discriminationlegislation. Unsurprisingly, the new regulations apply to ‘workers’ (ratherthan just ’employees’); they cover recruitment, contractual terms and otherbenefits, training, dismissals and other detriment; and prohibit direct andindirect discrimination, harassment and victimisation. However, there are someimportant new concepts and significant departures from the format of previousanti-discrimination legislation. “Sexual orientation” means “an orientation towards persons ofthe same sex, the opposite sex or persons of the same and opposite sex”or, in layman’s terms, heterosexuality, homosexuality and bisexuality. As aresult, all workers will potentially be able to make claims under theregulations – a straight employee could claim harassment by a gay colleague orboss, and vice versa. The definition of religious discrimination is more controversial. Theregulations do not exhaustively list the religions or faiths which attractprotection. Instead it is deliberately open-ended – “any religion,religious belief, or similar philosophical belief”. The latter part iswide ranging and would include atheism, agnosticism and humanism. One important aspect of the regulations is that they cover discriminationbased on a perception (accurate or not) of an individual’s sexuality or religiousbelief. An employee taunted by their colleagues because of a suspicion theywere homosexual would be able to bring a complaint. In the case of indirect discrimination, the new regulations adopt therevised form of indirect discrimination recently introduced into the SSA. This test differs significantly from the traditional approach. It is nolonger necessary to show discrimination arises from the application of arequirement or condition, which case law had interpreted to mean an absolutebar. It will be sufficient to show a discriminatory “practice, provisionor criteria” – a much looser test. Further, applicants will no longer have to show that a substantially smallerproportion of their particular group can comply with the requirement – an elementwhich in practice required the production of detailed, often complex,statistical evidence of the number of people of different groups who could andcould not comply with the discriminatory rule. Substantial disadvantage Applicants must now show “a substantial disadvantage” comparedwith the comparator group. While statistical evidence may remain important insome cases, tribunals may interpret such statistics less stringently and mayaccept other forms of social and economic expert evidence. Finally, the test of justification is much more stringent – the employermust show that the discriminatory measure is a “proportionate means ofachieving a legitimate aim”, rather than being able to show that thediscrimination is justified on objective grounds. This indirect discrimination test will also be adopted for racediscrimination. The overall effect is that indirect discrimination claims maybecome much more effective as a means of promoting equality and social changethan before. A further key feature of the new rights is the introduction of specificprotection against acts taking place after termination. Typically, cases todate have concerned victimisation and references – for example, the employergiving a bad reference, or sometimes no reference at all, for an employee whohas previously complained of discrimination. While European case law has extended sex discrimination protection to coverpost-termination victimisation, such claims have been consistently rejected inthe context of race and disability discrimination, although the House of Lordswill shortly consider the issue in De Souza v Lambeth Borough Council. The draft regulations prohibit discrimination after the working relationshiphas ended as long as the alleged discriminatory act would have been unlawful ifit had taken place during the working relationship and “arises out of, andis closely connected to, the relevant relationship”. While this clearlycovers references, it may also cover situations such as a job application froma former employee. The DTI Consultation Paper, however, suggests that asituation where one worker harassed a former colleague in a purely socialcontext would not be covered. These new rights clearly create fresh areas of vulnerability for employers.One key risk is that of harassment, either by a line manager or, perhaps, morecommonly, by a colleague. Sex and race harassment claims are alreadysignificant problem areas for employers and no crystal ball is necessary to seethat sexual orientation and religious belief may also prove to be fertile areasfor complaint. Harassment often takes the form of banter, abuse, ridicule oradverse comments about anything which makes one worker different from the norm.Workplace banter In this context, harassment on the grounds of sexual orientation (orperceived sexual orientation) may present the greatest risk – given thathomophobia is still a major issue in society at large. It is also predictablethat many complaints will arise from unwanted speculation or comments about acolleague’s private life and, as with sex discrimination, workplace banter mayeasily cross the line into harassment. Unlike existing discrimination legislation, the regulations create aspecific offence of unlawful harassment. The definition is essentiallyconsistent with existing case law, in that the harassment has to be”unwanted conduct” which has “the purpose or effect of eitherviolating the applicant’s dignity or creating an intimidating, hostile,degrading, humiliating or offensive environment”. While the existence of harassment is judged on all the facts of the case,this includes the victim’s reasonable perception of the effect of thetreatment. One of the principal difficulties in defending harassment claims is that theemployer is vicariously liable for one worker’s acts against another. Whileemployers must be careful to ensure their response to harassment complaints isnot in itself discriminatory – by responding promptly, thoroughly, reasonablyand not penalising employees for raising complaints – they often findthemselves in the unfortunate position where if an act of harassment hasoccurred, they will be liable for it regardless of how well they respond. Toavoid such liability, employers must take all reasonably practicable steps toprevent the unlawful act occurring – tribunals have often shown themselvesreluctant to let employers off the hook, however. Nevertheless, there are a number of practical steps employers can take toput themselves in the best position to defend claims (see Action Points, topright). These involve ensuring that equal opportunities policies and statements(many of which already cover sexuality and religion) are not mere ‘paper’documents, but are given real meaning and effect in the workplace. Recruitment and promotions exercises are also a key area of risk,particularly where religious belief makes it difficult for job applicants tocomply with traditional working hours or with dress codes. Conflicting rights Contracts of employment should also be considered for their potentialdiscriminatory effects, such as rules that prevent workers taking holidays forreligious festivals or the denial of benefits to same sex partners (althoughpension benefits are expressly not covered by the new rules). Where such disparityexists, employers must carefully consider whether the more stringent test forjustification could be met. Workforce monitoring is an important part of ensuring compliance withequality legislation. While a person’s sex and (to a lesser extent) race may berelatively obvious, sexuality or religious belief cannot be so readilyidentified. Employees cannot be forced to provide this information and indeed may bevery reluctant to do so. Even if it is obtained, such information constitutessensitive personal data under the Data Protection Act 1998 and employers musttherefore be careful to obtain the worker’s informed consent to this use. An additional problem is that the new regulations could introduceconflicting rights. One worker’s homosexuality may offend the religious beliefsof a colleague, for instance. This dispute may lead to mutual harassment withthe unfortunate employer facing two or more harassment complaints at the sametime. The regulations and indeed the Government’s consultation documentsprovide no solution to this problem. As ever in the field of discrimination, employers are placed in thefrontline of the battle to change social attitudes and face the dual burden ofboth promoting equality and meeting the liabilities and costs of new employmentrights. Employers should act now to keep ahead of these major developments. Christopher Mordue is an associate at Pinsent Curtis Bidwell Key concepts of discrimination– Direct discrimination Treating employee less favourably than another ongrounds of sexual orientation or religious belief. Applicant must showcomparator (actual or hypothetical) whose circumstances are the same or notmaterially different. No justification defence is available– Indirect discrimination Theapplication of a provision, practice or criteria which applies or would applyequally to persons of a different religious belief or sexual orientation butwhich puts or would put persons of the same religion/belief or sexualorientation at a particular disadvantage when compared with others puts theapplicant at that disadvantage and which the employer cannot show to be aproportionate means of achieving a legitimate aim– Harassment on grounds ofsexuality/belief, X engages in unwanted conduct which has the purpose or effectof either violating Y’s dignity or creating an intimidating hostile degradinghumiliating or offensive environment for Y. Whether this effect is present isto be determined by having regard to all the circumstances including thereasonable perception of Y– Post-termination discrimination It is unlawful todiscriminate against former employee by subjecting them to detriment or toharassment where the discrimination or harassment arises out of and is closelyconnected to the former work relationship– Victimisation Treating the employeeless favourably than the employer would treat another in the same circumstancesbecause the employee has brought proceedings under the regulations, alleged abreach of the regulations, given evidence for another employee, and so forthAction points– Ensure policies and statements gobeyond mere paper commitments– Review equal opportunities policies and statements,harassment procedures and training materials to ensure new forms ofdiscrimination are covered– Train line managers on the new rules and how to spot and dealwith harassment– Train/brief all employees (including new recruits) on theimportance of non-discriminatory behaviour, disciplinary consequences ofharassment and the procedures for raising complaints– Appoint harassment counsellors to act as informal sources ofadvice for employees– Deal firmly and proportionately with harassers, underdisciplinary procedures if appropriate– Review terms and conditions and working practices forpotentially discriminatory issues– Look at ways of celebrating and promoting workplace diversity– Review selection criteria and procedures for recruitment andpromotions. Ensure the criteria used reflect the needs of the job. Traininterviewers on diversity and discrimination issues and ensure they keep a fullwritten record of reasons for decisions– Use the time before the new laws take effect toconduct questionnaires and informal soundings to identify potential areas ofdisputes or harassment. This allows issues to be tackled before employees gaintheir new rights Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

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Galaxy clinch 1st playoff spot since 2016 with win over RSL

first_img Associated Press Written by Tags: Los Angeles Galaxy/MLS/MLS Playoffs/Real Salt Lake FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSANDY, Utah (AP) — Cristian Pavón and Zlatan Ibrahimovic each scored a second-half goal and Los Angeles edged Real Salt Lake 2-1 on Wednesday night for the Galaxy’s first playoff berth since 2016.Ibrahimovic has scored 28 goals this season, two behind Carlos Vela’s league-leading 30 for LAFC.Pavon struck first for Los Angeles (16-13-3) in the 50th minute with a shot 17 yards out from the left side of the penalty box, assisted by Ibrahimovic. Los Angeles went ahead 2-0 in the 80th on Ibrahimovic’s shot 13 yards out from the center of the box, assisted by Pavon.Nedum Onuoha scored for Real Salt Lake (14-13-5) in the 89th with a header 11 yards away from the center of the box, assisted by Sebastian Saucedo.Real Salt Lake outshot the Galaxy 18 to 11, with five shots on goal to three for Los Angeles.Los Angeles drew four corner kicks, committed nine fouls and was given two yellow cards. Real Salt Lake drew seven corner kicks, committed seven fouls and was given one yellow card.Both teams next play Sunday. Real Salt Lake hosts Houston, and Los Angeles hosts Vancouver. September 25, 2019 /Sports News – Local Galaxy clinch 1st playoff spot since 2016 with win over RSLlast_img read more

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Property Contract With No-Cheating Clause Enforceable

first_imgProperty Contract With No-Cheating Clause EnforceableOlivia Covington for www.theindianalawyer.comA Jefferson County woman must convey her assets in a property she shared with her ex-boyfriend after she became pregnant by another man in breach of a contract she signed with the ex-boyfriend, the Indiana Court of Appeals found Friday.In Tina L. Hemingway v. John P. Scott, 39A04-1604-PL-957, John Scott inherited a 10-acre parcel of land from his father in 2001. After moving in together, Tina Hemingway and Scott each signed a contract in 2012 in which Scott promised to convey the property to himself and Hemingway and also included a list of conditions that would constitute a breach, including “cheating.” Additionally, a remedies clause held that any breach by Hemingway would require her to convey her interest in the property to Scott via a quitclaim deed.About two months later, Hemingway became pregnant by another man and moved out in June 2013, when she ceased any financial or other contributions to the property. On June 17, Scott sent Hemingway a notice that she was in breach of the contract and was required to convey her interest back to him pursuant to the contract.In September 2015, Hemingway filed a petition for partition of the property and Scott filed a counterclaim for breach of contract and replevin. In April 2016, the Jefferson Circuit Court issued an order concluding that Hemingway had breached the contract and requiring her to convey her interests back to Scott by quitclaim deed.Hemingway appealed, arguing that the contract merged into the deed conveying the property to Scott and Hemingway as joint tenants and, thus, was extinguished by the express terms of the deed.  But Indiana Court of Appeals Judge Terry Crone wrote that the language of the contract held that it should “be attached to the property deed,” indicating the intent of the parties for the contract to survive the deed.Further, Crone wrote that the contractual obligations to fidelity and to shared expenses and labor were not necessary to the completion of the conveyance, but instead were “prospective in nature and addressed conduct that would trigger the operation of the remedies clause, specifically here, a reconveyance to Scott.”  Thus, the doctrine of merger did not apply, he wrote.Hemingway further argued that the contract was unenforceable based on public policy that prohibits contract in consideration of meretricious sexual services, but Crone wrote that the appellate court also disagreed with that argument. He likened the contract to a prenuptial agreement and pointed out that Scott and Hemingway had previously lived together and then separated, so the contract was written with the intent that they would get back together and conduct themselves as a unit with respect to the property.Further, Crone wrote that the forfeiture suffered by Scott if the contract were not enforced would be “serious and grievous.” Additionally, Hemingway breached not only the no-cheating clause, but also a clause requiring her to contribute to the property’s expenses when she moved out in June 2013. Thus, the appellate court found that Hemingway must reconvey her interest to Scott by a quitclaim deed.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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Results of 2017 Night in Venice Boat and House Decorating Contests

first_imgHOUSE RESULTS#, Last Name, ThemeZone 1: 1st Place: #135, Mulhall – “Born in the USA”2nd Place: #47, Hornyak – “A Fan Farewell to Ringling Brothers Circus”3rd Place: #64, McGowan – “Peace, Love and Ocean City”Zone 2: 1st Place: #113, Trofa – “Trust the Process”2nd Place: #88, Dubois – “OC Rockin Thru The Decades”3rd Place: #137, McMahon – “Back To The Bayou”Zone 3: 1st Place: #84, Kelly – “Papa Kelly’s Luau”2nd Place: #120, Barnes – “Camp Snug”3rd Place: #145, Tamburri – “Margaretville”Zone 4: 1st Place: #28, Hernandez – “Hanging in the 60’s”2nd Place:  #29, Kull – “Anchors Aweigh!”3rd Place:  #136, Thorton – “Rockin’ Through Pleasure Ave”Zone 5: 1st Place: #72, Thorton – “Sittin’ on the Deck of the Bay”2nd Place: #50, Sage – “Prince and the Revolution”3rd Place: #46, Rearden/O’Connell – “Hula Hop”Zone 6: 1st Place: #52, Gans – “Rocking through Bedrock”2nd Place: #117, Gifford – “Welcome to the Jungle”3rd Place: #39, Chiumento – “Dancing on the Deck in OC”Zone 7: 1st Place: #132, Severino – “Rock Stars on 17th”2nd Place: #24, Davidson – “Rock and Roll Legends”3rd Place: #69, Scanlon/Brandenberger – “Prince of Ocean City”Zone 8: 1st Place: #119, Borkowski – “1978’s Animal House”2nd Place: #59, Markert/Mardi – “60’s Rock Feeling Groovy in OC”3rd Place: #140, Hurly – “Rock Through The Ages”Zone 9: 1st Place: #129, Trabbold – “The Rock Through The Decades”2nd Place: #116, Maxwell – “The Ocean Lights Up OC”3rd Place: #93, Hoffman – “Grease”Zone 10: 1st Place: #87, Brand – “LiveAid 1985”2nd Place: #161, Church – “Jailhouse Rockin Thru The Decades”3rd Place: #53, Sutera – “Reviving the age of Aquarius”Zone 11: 1st Place: #127, Pellegrino – “The Great Gatsby”2nd Place: #73, Weigel – “Jailhouse Rock”3rd Place: #60, McEntee – “Come Fly With Me”Zone 12: 1st Place: #20, Cassidy – “1920’s Stork Club”2nd Place: #133, Votta – “Shamrock Dock”3rd Place: #79, Paul – “Mardi Gras”Zone 13: 1st Place: #11, Coluzzi – “Coluzzi is the Word – Rockin’ the Decades with Grease”2nd Place: #95, VanStone – “Rockin the 60s”3rd Place: #80, McKenna – “Fast Times at Ocean City High”Zone 14: 1st Place: #90, Harbor House – “School of Rock”2nd Place: #91, Marina Mews – “Saturday Night in Venice Fever”3rd Place: #58, Bay Village Condos – “Celebrating 1970’s featuring Summer Blockbuster Jaws” The following are the results of the 2017 Night in Venice boat and house decorating contests held on July 22, 2017. Winners can pick up their awards at City Hall (861 Asbury Avenue) starting at 9 a.m. Monday, July 24.2017 Night in Venice ResultsBOAT RESULTSBest in show 25’ and over#227 – “70’s Nightclub”Brian TonerBoat name: ShantiBest in show 24’ and under #242 – “Peace*Love*Music”The Young and Beiswinger FamiliesBoat name: That’s What Sea SaidBest College #232 – West Chester UniversityFeaturing Erin McCarthy Miss WCU 2017Best Lead Boat #202 –Marine MaxFeaturing Alfonso RibeiroBest Commercial#257 – Trident MarinaCaptain Joe StewartBest Non-profit#211 – Spotlight Performers Show Choir from Ocean City Theatre CompanySponsored by Ocean City’s P.B.A.Best Decorated 25’ and over 1st Place: #250 – Duke of Fluke “Roaring Twenties”2nd Place: #222 – Full Moon 2  “Cheeseburger in Paradise”3rd Place:#249 – The Arianna “Mardi Gras”Best Decorated 24’ and under 1st Place: #237 –  False Alarm “Surfin’ Through The 60’s”2nd Place: #238 – Moondance “Great Gatsby”3rd Place: #247 – Diane III “Philadelphia Eagles”Comic 25’ and over 1st Place:#241 – “Flight Attendant Training School”2nd Place:#252 – Sea Wagon “America in Space”3rd Place:#217 – Three Amigos “1950s Era Rock and Roll”Comic 24’ and under 1st Place:#243 – Kiki “Rock of All Ages”2nd Place:#214 – LOUNEY-Toon “Sharks”3rd Place:#231 – RobaloMusical 25’ and over 1st Place:#223 –Big Daddy Sweat Pea “Rock Thru The Ages”2nd Place:#248 – Miss Heather “Rockin’ the 50s”3rd Place:#235 – Carrie Lynn “Jazz, Dirty”Music 24’ and under 1st Place:#254 – The Three C’s “A KISS from the 70’s”2nd Place:#225 – Thunder Road “70’s”Original 25’ and over1st Place:#253 – Diablo “Dead in the Water2nd Place:#246 – Starfish “Laura and Jim’s Wedding”3rd Place:#213 – T-Wrecks “You Only Rock Once”Original 24’ and under 1st Place:#216 – Annabo “ZZ Top”Classic 24’ and under 1st Place:#245 – Class of 1957 “Disco Saturday Night”2nd Place:#224 –  Mike Caserta with Casco3rd Place:#221 – Little Red “Carnival Ride”Decorated by Kids Boat 24’ and under 1st Place: #220 – Odds on 7 “Pirates of the Caribbean”2nd Place:#228 – Mary Mack “Music of the 1920’s”last_img read more

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News story: Lord Ahmad congratulates The Gambia on Commonwealth re-entry

first_imgLord (Tariq) Ahmad of Wimbledon, Foreign and Commonwealth Office Minister for the Commonwealth, visited The Gambia on 15 and 16 February to offer congratulations on the country’s re-entry to the Commonwealth.The Minister met with senior government ministers, including President Adama Barrow, Minister of Foreign Affairs Ousainou Darboe, and Vice-President Fatoumata Tambajang, where he discussed the government’s commitments to reforms in keeping with the Commonwealth’s principles of democracy, equality for all citizens, and good governance.Lord Ahmad said: Media enquiries Follow the Foreign Office on Instagram, YouTube and LinkedIn For journalists The UK warmly congratulates the people of The Gambia on this country’s re-entry to the Commonwealth family of nations. When the Foreign Secretary visited last year, he met many Gambians who share the common values of the Commonwealth and wanted to re-join – and who felt as if they had never truly left. We have welcomed the Government’s progress on human rights and governance over the past year. It is important now that there is continued, concerted commitment and tangible action: human rights, freedom of expression, equality for all, and strengthening rule of law are critical building blocks for a sustainable, successful democracy. I am delighted to have formally invited, on behalf of the Prime Minister, President Barrow to the UK for the next Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting in April, and we look forward to working with The Gambia as a Commonwealth partner once more. Follow the Foreign Office on Twitter @foreignoffice and Facebook Follow Foreign Office Minister Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon on Twitter @tariqahmadbt Lord Ahmad also met with civil society organisations, human rights groups, and members of the international community, including to hear about the challenges facing many women and girls, from lack of access to quality education, to FGM, early marriage and inequality.Further information Email [email protected]last_img read more

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Broadway Grosses: An American in Paris Feels the Love

first_img View Comments Something tells us this is more than “Beginner’s Luck.” In the week preceding the Tony Award nominations, An American in Paris leapt to the top five grossing shows, making $1,235,247 (the highest of its run so far). It joined perennial favorites/usual suspects The Lion King, Wicked, Aladdin and The Book of Mormon. While we expect the s’wonderful tuner to receive a nod on April 28, three new musicals whose numbers are not as high could also benefit from hearing their named called: The Visit, It Shoulda Been You and Doctor Zhivago. Meanwhile, John Cameron Mitchell celebrated his forthcoming Tony Honor early by playing the strongest week of his run in Hedwig and the Angry Inch. For his final seven performances, the show’s co-creator brought in $702,944. Darren Criss will don the wig and makeup beginning April 29.Here’s a look at who was on top—and who was not—for the week ending April 26:FRONTRUNNERS (By Gross)1. The Lion King ($1,972,747)2. Wicked ($1,740,459)3. Aladdin ($1,492,453)4. The Book of Mormon ($1,469,646)5. An American in Paris ($1,235,247)UNDERDOGS (By Gross)5. Hand to God ($343,574)4. The Heidi Chronicles ($313,425)3. The Visit ($180,105)*2. Living on Love ($155,646)1. Airline Highway ($126,468)*FRONTRUNNERS (By Capacity)1. The Book of Mormon (102.53%)2. Fish in the Dark (101.58%)3. The Audience (100.72%)**4. Aladdin (100.01%)5. The King and I (100.00%)=5. Skylight (100.00%)UNDERDOGS (By Capacity)5. Gigi (66.13%)4. Jersey Boys (64.08%)3. Wolf Hall Parts One & Two (60.01%)2. On the Town (57.10%)1. The Heidi Chronicles (52.39%)* Number based on three preview performances and five regular performances**Number based on seven regular performancesSource: The Broadway Leaguelast_img read more

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‘Unusually strong’ lending by credit unions in February, and it’s not about leap year

first_imgCredit union loan growth topped 0.3% in February, pacing a 0.9% increase on an annual basis, according to the Credit Union National Association’s (CUNA) monthly credit union estimates.Bill Hampel, CUNA chief policy officer/chief economist, noted that the month’s performance was impressive historically, and not just because of the extra day afforded to February by a leap year.“Unusually strong,” Hampel said. “Strongest February loan increase since the early 2000s.”The loan-to-savings ratio also remained healthy, coming in at 76.8%–a number CUNA economists expect to climb to 80% by the end of 2016 and to 85% by the end of 2017. continue reading » 6SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img

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Jasenka Kranjčević, IZTZG: How will the COVID-19 pandemic affect health security in the tourism sector

first_imgIt is known that the health security of tourism significantly depends on compliance with health regulations, health opportunities, but also the organization of the national, regional and local public health system. Precisely this last fact showed that where there is a well-organized public health system on humane principles, the pandemic was kept under control as much as possible and did not significantly affect the overall health system. If no vaccine is found in the foreseeable future, in all areas where tourism takes place, it is necessary to ensure stricter social distance and hygiene (restaurants, beaches, public swimming pools, sports buildings, cultural buildings, souvenir shops, shops, etc.). In that case, it will be necessary to change / supplement the regulations, recommendations, plans and studies on possible reception capacities which regulate the maximum number of tourists, e.g. for beaches, hotels, swimming pools, etc.  Attachment: dr.sc. Jasenka Kranjčević: Tourism and Health Security “Tourism and health security“Is the title of a new professional paper from the Institute of Tourism, this time by dr.sc. Jasenka Kranjčević in which she commented on how the COVID-19 pandemic will affect health security in the tourism sector.  It is known that tourism has an interdisciplinary dimension, and depending on its spatial coverage and intensity, so far it has been more or less monitored through its impact and connection with the economy, law, transport, environment, spatial planning, architecture, etc. work dr.sc. Jasenka Kranjčević. and adds that now that tourism has been hit by a pandemic, its perhaps neglected dimension is visible, and that is the health security of tourism, but in a different way. Also, Kranjčević emphasizes that given the mobility of tourists and the desire to change the destination, the question of the right to move and monitor movement arises. In the tourist promotion of Croatia, she should, among other things, emphasize and emphasize the tradition and results of the public health system, concludes Kranjčević. It is known that trust between tourist supply and demand takes a long time to build, and can be easily lost due to emergencies, which is perhaps the biggest problem. The pandemic has shown that health security in tourism (tourists, tourism stakeholders and the domicile population) may not have been highlighted enough, but has now proved very important and should be taken into account when planning and monitoring the sustainable development of tourism. Therefore, it may be time to establish new relationships at the global level, among other things, to monitor the sustainable development of tourism. center_img Perhaps medical, health, dental tourism and other types and forms of tourism will gain new meaning and be more strongly connected with health security and the health system, Kranjčević points out and emphasizes that a strong national and regional health system, as well as the ability to fast and quality response, certainly have a strong connection with tourism in the context of a sense of security of a destination. Tourism will be increasingly linked to health security2 and monitoring the public health system where tourism takes place. This means that in the new relations, the issue of health security will become an important segment in the preparation of travel, choosing a destination, but also the provision of services in tourism, believes Kranjčević. In the end, he points out that it is assumed that the feeling of health security in tourism will become one of the important impressions and challenges for the destination, but also for witnesses in tourism as well as the local population. Therefore, the perception of quality health security and services may be increasingly important for tourism, and it will be necessary to expand research in this regard as well. Therefore, perhaps now is the time to reconsider the existing principles and settings of sustainable tourism development, its interdisciplinarity, and thus the health security of tourism at all levels. The entire professional work of dr.sc. Jasenka Kranjčević read in the attachment: Regardless of how the recovery of the tourism industry after the pandemic is designed, there is no doubt that health security in tourism will gain a new dimension through the establishment of new relationships with the economy, law, transport, spatial planning, architecture, reception capacity, health, agriculture, culture , sports, etc. It is understood that not only the health security of tourism is important, but also the health security of the local population. Cover photo: Porapak Apichodilok/ Pexels.comlast_img read more

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