Powerfully Simple: Modern Management for Dell EMC Data Protection

first_imgVisibility across Dell EMC Data Protection Software and protection storage brings simplicity.Good news! Dell EMC is announcing modern, simple management for Dell EMC Data Protection.This modern management enables users to gain control over their data protection through:Complete visibility via customizable dashboardsUnified management across multiple sites and systemsSimple search and recovery enabled by Google-like keyword searchComprehensive reporting generated with a single clickSimple protection automationVMware integrationDell EMC Data Protection management software is easily downloadable and included without additional cost with Dell EMC Data Protection Software.Complete Visibility via DashboardsA comprehensive view across data protection environments allows users to gain a complete picture of their data protection environment. Through customizable dashboards, they can instantly identify the health of their data protection environment and the capacity of their protection storage and servers. Dell EMC Data Protection management software also provides an efficient method to manage policies across multiple systems and ability to swiftly identify/resolve issues with real-time alerts. Unified Management Across Sites and SystemsOur unified management allows users to manage their data protection across multiple sites, systems, and consumption models with centralized management.  It addresses the majority of day-to-day tasks from a single pane of glass to perform policy management and run backups on-demand.Simple Search and RecoveryDell EMC Data Protection makes search and recovery simple.  Our management software offers a Google-like keyword search and powerful filtering that makes it easy to find relevant file(s) across data protection systems. Users can recover directly from their search results, greatly reducing the time to recovery.Comprehensive Reporting                                                  Businesses often need up-to-date information about the data protection process as a whole to ensure SLOs are being met. Comprehensive reporting allows you to run pre-configured reports on-demand with a single click.Simple protection automation Through our management software, backup administrators can automatically discover database assets, provision protection storage, and enforce policy management, allowing them to efficiently monitor and enforce SLO compliance.VMware IntegrationVMware integration enables vAdmins to protect VMware environments from native interfaces and protect across multiple vCenters from a modern vSphere plugin.Dell EMC modern management enhances our comprehensive portfolio of data protection in the industry, making it powerfully simple! For more information please visit www.dellEMC.com/dataprotectionlast_img read more

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Bellacappella takes the stage at Saint Mary’s

first_imgAfter a snowy Thursday, Bellacappella, Saint Mary’s premier a cappella group, performed their appropriately titled fall concert, “Christmas in November,” Thursday evening at the O’Laughlin Auditorium.Caitlyn Jordan | The Observer “Usually our concerts are later in the year, but there were a lot of scheduling conflicts,” Bellacappella president senior Nia Parillo said. “That’s why we named it ‘Christmas in November.’ It’s just kind of a classic, [where] we have some classic songs we sing.”Parillo said her fellow Bellas sang on the O’Laughlin stage without body microphones this year due to sound issues with the Little Theater next door, she said.“We spoke to the mic technicians, and we have mics, but we have standing mics,” she said. “We’re kicking it Bella old school, going back to our roots, pure acapella. This is probably the biggest one we’ve done yet, just kind of going with the flow of what’s happening. The girls have worked so hard. I couldn’t be more proud of them and all the hard work they’ve put in. No matter what happens behind the scenes, it’s going to be a great show.”The group added six new group members, all freshmen and sophomores, at the beginning of the year, Parillo said.“In the beginning of the year, we kind of just go through how Bella works, especially with the new girls we took on,” she said. “We took on six this year, and they’re all amazing.”When it came to preparing song arrangements, the women of Bella are advised to think of songs they enjoy listening to, whether they be current hits or oldies, Parillo said.“It’s usually just, ‘Give me a list, and let’s see how it goes,’” Parillo said. “When we listen to the music, we just kind of brainstorm together what the audience would want to listen to and what we would like to sing. That’s how we have the lineup that we have. We have new songs, we have old songs. That’s how we figured out what we were going to pick.”Parillo, an alto, arranges her own music, as does every member of Bella with her own personal technique, Parillo said.“We all arrange our own music,” she said. “Everyone in the group arranges their own songs. Some girls get ideas off of music notes. Some of the older girls, like myself, they listen by ear, so they listen to the song and figure out what they could do. They figure out what would sound best. It’s difficult, when you first start learning how to arrange. We do bring back older Bella arrangements. We all make our own. We just kind of throw the notes together.”Throughout football season, Bellacappella has toured tailgates across Notre Dame’s campus, singing some of its favorites while promoting the group, Parillo said. Several songs have become big fan favorites, she said.“A big crowd pleaser for people who have followed Bella is [Mika’s] ‘Grace Kelly,’” she said. “That’s a crowd-pleaser for the seniors. I like to think they’re all crowd favorites. When we do tailgate at Notre Dame, we start with ‘I Love Rock n’ Roll.’ That’s another step in our job, performing for them.”After their fall concert, Bella is now looking to the future for new arrangements, including a Disney medley, Parillo said.“We’re hoping to have a little medley next semester,” she said. “That’s going to be a little project over Christmas break. It’s on my Bella bucketlist. I have these little things I want to do before I graduate.”Parillo hopes to continue to make known Bella’s presence not only on Saint Mary’s campus but also beyond it, she said.“Some people don’t even know we have an a cappella group, and that kind of just bums us out,” she said. “We’re trying to get our name out not just on campus but outside of campus. We were asked here and there if Bella could perform. We’re trying to sing at Senior Dads [weekend], Junior Moms, Sophomore Parents, those kinds of events, just trying to get our name out there.”As a senior, Parillo said she knows the future of Bella fluctuates every year between graduating students and new members, she said.“The group changes significantly every year with who graduates,” she said. “The group sometimes takes a few steps forward and then a few steps back. Things change and things happen, but being the premiere a cappella group on campus, we’d hope Saint Mary’s would know we were here. We’re excited to perform, and we are willing to combine with groups. It’s really just bringing the community together. I just hope Bella takes a lot of steps forward from this great place we are now.”If there’s anything Parillo wants the audience to take away from Bella’s fall concert, it’s a sense of fun and enjoyment, she said.“I hope they’re like, ‘Wow, you can tell they put so much time into this,’ Parillo said. “A lot of this is give and take. It’s not, ‘We’re going to sing at you.’ I want them to have a great time. I want them to be in the moment with us.”Tags: bellacappella, Christmas in November, fall concert, Nia Parillo, O’Laughlin Auditoriumlast_img read more

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SMC’s Moreau Art Galleries display student artwork

first_imgStarting this week and extending through finals week, the Saint Mary’s Moreau Art Galleries will display a rotating exhibit of student work from the Department of Art’s Video, Advanced Painting and Drawing I classes.Professor of Art Ian Weaver said in an email, “Rather than have the gallery empty for the final month of the semester, myself and Professor [Julie] Tourtillotte decided to use the space to install the final works from our courses.“My students also have the required research they have done along with their work; it has been placed on the pedestals next to the work.”Tourtillotte, the instructor for this display, said in an email that the videos on display from the Department of Film Studies “are highlights from this semester’s work in ART 224 Video Art. The students in this course learn about camera use, lighting, audio and editing with Final Cut Pro.“The video exhibitions in Hammes Gallery will change over this Thursday to the students’ final project for this semester — two collaborative video installations titled, ‘There/Not There’ and ‘Nature Studies: Earth, Air, Fire, Water,’ she said. “These installations will remain on exhibit through next Thursday, Dec. 17.”Brigid Feasel, a junior with a double concentration in Studio and Art History and an emphasis in painting and writing is one of the art students whose work will appear in the exhibit. “My pieces are very detail-oriented and I like creating narratives within them, but I also don’t like taking things too seriously, so I like to add elements of humor to lighten up the scene,” Feasel said in an email. “My pieces in Moreau right now are made to essentially evoke the Romantic Landscape awe and introspective thoughts that are brought about when being exposed to the vastness of nature, but this isn’t a person’s journey, it’s a cow’s journey (where the humor comes in).“I’m still trying to figure out my own artistic aesthetic at this point, but I know I want to incorporate humor and narratives into my future work. The subjects, I guess, will come from inspiration somewhere or from my own imagination,” Feasel said.As an art major at Saint Mary’s, Feasel said she knows her professors will help her form her own style and push her artistic limits. Alexandra Pittel, a junior whose work is also displayed in the gallery, said in an email, “My work reflects my commitment to detail though the technical application as well as conceptual aspects of my research. Later in the semester, I started to think of this set of paintings as a Phenomenological progression with a cast of characters. My hope is that the viewer is able to engage with the pieces as a documentation of my reality, that they can interpret in a way that is meaningful to their own spiritual and physical consciousness. “The interdisciplinary approach that allows my work to be multi layered is very much fostered by the liberal arts environment here at Saint Mary’s and my wonderful professors.”Tags: Moreau Art Galleries, student artworklast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s receives donation of clock for 175th anniversary

first_imgThe family of a Saint Mary’s alumna recently gifted the College with a royal blue clock in honor of the institution’s 175th anniversary.“This clock and seating area commemorate the 175th anniversary of Saint Mary’s College,” the clock’s inscription reads. “It honors our founders, the Sisters of the Holy Cross, whose vision to educate young women formed the beginning of this outstanding Catholic women’s college. Gift of the Frank L. Dunham family.”The timepiece is located near the Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex to commemorate “our 175th anniversary in an enduring way,” vice president for College relations Shari Rodriguez said in an email.“The clock is one of several gifts in honor of the 175th, and the generosity of our community is part of what has kept Saint Mary’s strong for 175 years,” she said. “We continue to respond to the needs of our community for more gathering space, which is part of what the gift of the clock and landscaping Library Green offers.”Though the College has good intentions with the installment of the timepiece, sophomore Jane Korson said she does not see the need or appeal of the clock.“Nobody needs a clock — I’m just being real with you. We all have watches or phones that tell us the time. Nobody’s going to be looking up at that thing at night even if it does light up in the dark,” Korson said. “Also, I don’t believe it really goes with the structure of the buildings, really, like it doesn’t match with anything. It’s nice. Thank you to whoever gave it to us, but I just think we need a lot of updates around campus.”At first, Korson believed the clock was the result of a monetary donation. Korson said she believes donations can be put to better use and decided to create a petition to bring these concerns to the attention of College administration.“I was planning on doing an action of change a while ago but seeing the clock kind of triggered it,” Korson said. “It’s not that I’m not grateful for the clock or anything, but I think that our monetary gifts could be better used towards other things that we actually need … I found out that it was a gift after writing the petition, which made things a little bit awkward. But it’s still a point to get across.”Sophomore Jill Nalepinski said she is struggling to see the usefulness behind the installation.“I haven’t seen it [in real life] yet, but I’ve seen pictures of it, and I think it’s pretty shiny and pretty cute,” Nalepinski said. “All around, I don’t know if it’s necessary on campus, but it’s pretty to look at. I guess that’s cool.”Some, like sophomore Anne Kish, do not see the appeal of the clock, and Kish said she believes the design of the clock is not cohesive with the rest of the College, similar to Korson.“I think it’s actually quite tacky,” Kish said. “It looks like it should be in London. It doesn’t look like it belongs in the United States.”But it is this European look that makes others, like senior Angeline Barthel, see the clock as a nice addition to the campus, Barthel said.“I think it has a nice aesthetic for sure, but I don’t see any practical use for it,” Barthel said. “It reminds me of ‘Harry Potter’ which is cool because the aesthetic of Saint Mary’s is kind of old, Harry Potter-like.”Regardless, Rodriguez said she wishes the clock will serve to inspire Saint Mary’s students in the future and is thankful for the opportunities donors provide the College.“We hope the clock will be a reminder of the College’s history and the significance of educating women for 175 years. We are thrilled to have installed the clock at the beginning of the 175th year,” she said. “The generosity of our donors provides over 300 scholarships for students, our facilities, as well as support for current operations.”Tags: 175 years of SMC, 175th anniversary, angela athletic and wellness complexlast_img read more

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20 Best control, least toxic

first_imgBy April Reese University of Georgia Volume XXVIII Number 1 Page 20 Improperly applied gardening chemicals may run off landscapes and pollute water. In some cases, gardening runoff has killed fish.”The National Academy of Sciences reported that homeowners tend to use as much as 10 times more chemicals per acre (in and around their homes) than farmers use on their land,” said Susan Varlamoff. She’s an environmental sciences program coordinator with the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.”Our urban streams contain more pesticides, and at generally higher concentrations, than rural ones,” she said.Varlamoff said integrated pest management, or IPM, focuses on using cultural, mechanical and biological control methods in place of chemical pesticides in home landscapes.Is it really a pest?”Most people don’t realize that only 3 percent of insects are pests,” said Varlamoff, who is also a Georgia Master Gardener.”It’s important to know the difference between beneficial insects, which control pests naturally, and insects that devour your roses,” she said.Best method, least toxicOnce they identify the pest, gardeners who practice IPM use the best and least toxic combination of controls.Cultural Use plants suited for local rainfall, sun exposure, temperature, etc. Choose pest-resistant plants as often as you can. Choose a turf variety well-suited to your soils and climate. This makes the grass more competitive with weeds. Rotate vegetable and annual plants to avoid reoccurring pest problems such as root-knot nematodes. Till soils to destroy pests and crop residue that may harbor pests. Plant vegetables early in the growing season to avoid damaging levels of pests that may occur later.Mechanical Hand-destroy insect pests or hand-remove weeds if the pest density and number aren’t excessive. Prune or cut out diseased or insect-infested plants or plant parts. This can be used to control cankers, stem galls and boring insects. Mow grass so you remove no more than one-third of the height. Scalping grass stresses it, dries it out and promotes insect pests such as chinch bugs. Mulch vegetable gardens and ornamental plants with 3 to 5 inches of compost, pine bark or and pine needles. This reduces weeds and the need for herbicides and prevents soil erosion. Mulch can be made from homemade compost. Direct water sprays at infested plants to reduce aphids, lacebugs and other insect pests on plants.BiologicalParasites and predators in landscapes attack and kill insect pests. It’s important to conserve and enhance naturally occurring biological control agents in the landscape and vegetable garden. Don’t kill the good bugs. Before you grab the pesticide, learn the difference between beneficial insects and pests. In a well-balanced ecosystem, the good guys beat out the bad. Plant a variety of flowering annuals or perennials to provide more nectar sources and alternative prey for predators and parasites. Create landscape habitats that attract birds and other wildlife that prey on insect pests. For more information, contact the Georgia Wildlife Federation or visit www.gwf.org/education.htm.ChemicalYou may not always be able to control pests without using conventional chemicals.”Pesticides are often an important component of an IPM program,” Varlamoff said. “But you can harm people, pets and your environment if you use them irresponsibly. Like medicine, pesticides can have tremendous benefits, but misuse can have serious consequences.” Read the label. Select a pesticide based on the target pest, the plants you want to protect, the application equipment you have and the pesticide hazards. Use the least toxic control for the pest. Pesticides also include horticultural oils and insecticidal soaps that are less toxic than conventional pesticides. They can effectively manage certain insects. Apply pesticides only to the intended area. Blanket coverage may destroy beneficial insects as well as pests.”No single herbicide, insecticide or fungicide is appropriate for all landscape and vegetable pest problems,” Varlamoff said.For more information, see the Georgia Pest Control Handbook (www.ent.uga.edu/pest2001/) or Extension Toxicology Network at: (ace.orst.edu/info/extoxnet/).last_img read more

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Clips of the Week: Rangers Anonymous, Roner Vision, Record Backflips

first_imgOur favorite outdoor web videos from the week that was:1. Rangers AnonymousEven though the government, and thus our National Park System, is back open, this video sheds some light on what it was like to be a park ranger during the shutdown. Our National Parks became a poster child, lightning rod, and political tool all in the space of a couple of weeks. Many people were angry with the government, but many were also made at the Park Service for closing the parks, even though they had no choice.Anonymous Rangers from Amy Marquis on Vimeo.2. Backflip Heard Round the WorldAt the rowdy Red Bull Rampage competition Cam Zink launched the biggest mountain bike backflip of all time. It’s impressive, but he was 3rd. See his full run here, and Kyle Strait’s winning run here. 3. It’s About the FishOur friends at Southern Culture on the Fly dropped their latest fall issue, and included this philosophy/redfish video that drops knowledge and slabs in the low country.The Fish: SCOF issue #9 Moving Pictures from Southern Culture on the Fly on Vimeo.4. The Return of Roner VisionRoner goes to South America, skis a little, meets a Yeti, and squeezes in an illegal BASE jump. Winter is coming, get stoked.5. Short and Sweet on the Hiwassee RiverThis super-short vid elegantly captures an early morning fly fishing excursion on East Tennessee’s Hiwassee River in the late summer.On the River from Luwazo on Vimeo.BONUS VIDEO!This one is a little long, but well worth the time. Adidas is pouring money into their snowboarding division and welcome uber-badass Eric Jackson to the team with this outstanding mini-documentary about how Eric, and his bro John but mostly Eric, has become one of the biggest names in the game.Thanks for watching!Have a web vid you want featured on Clips of the Week? Leave it in the comments below or shoot an email to [email protected]last_img read more

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Blood drive honors fallen NYSP Trooper Skinner

first_img“These blood drives and different events we hold are an excellent way to keep their lives and experiences alive in our hearts,” said VanAuken. The blood drive comes at a time when the need for blood is critical. “Trooper Skinner gave his life for his community, among the other officers in Broome County and across the state and United States. It’s just a great way for us as troopers to give back, to give of yourselves, you’re actually giving a piece of yourself back to save lives,” said Captain Jeffrey VanAuken with NYSP. “Every two seconds someone needs blood in the United States. If you think about that, that’s a scary thought. With one blood donation, that has the power to save three lives. That could be someone in your family, in my family, maybe someone we will never know,” said Red Cross Broome County Account Manager Esperanza Gutierrez. KIRKWOOD (WBNG) — New York State Police Trooper Christopher Skinner was killed in the line of duty on May 29, 2014. Nearly six years later, state police continue to honor his memory through a blood drive. The act of giving to others, troopers say, would make Skinner proud. If you missed your chance to donate, you can find all upcoming blood drives with the Red Cross at this link.last_img read more

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Russian evolution

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Elder Abuse Awareness Day, 2015

first_imgElder Abuse Awareness Day, 2015 SHARE Email Facebook Twitter June 10, 2015 Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolf Proclamations Governor Wolf Proclamation — Elder Abuse Awareness Day, 2015 by Governor Tom Wolflast_img

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Experts Say Wolf Administration’s Opioid Epidemic Response Could Be National Model (Round-Up)

first_img December 17, 2018 National Issues,  Public Health,  Substance Use Disorder,  The Blog On Thursday, the American Medical Association (AMA) and Pennsylvania Medical Society (PAMED) announced a recent study of state responses to the opioid epidemic showed Pennsylvania had made “considerable progress” toward curbing substance abuse disorder in the commonwealth.“We conducted this analysis because it’s essential that policymakers know what is working, and where additional progress can be made,” said Patrice A. Harris, MD, MA, AMA president-elect and chair of the AMA Opioid Task Force. “There is long way to go to fully end the epidemic in Pennsylvania and across the nation, but it’s clear that Pennsylvania’s policymakers are employing multiple strategies that are showing promise.”The recognition came amid Stop Overdoses in PA: Get Help Now week, a multi-agency effort to stopping overdoses through a week of events. On Thursday, the Wolf Administration distributed more than 6,100 naloxone kits across the state.For more details on AMA and PAMED’s recognition of the Wolf Administration’s opioid effort or Stop Overdoses in PA: Get Help Now week, see below for excerpts of articles and op-eds from across the state.Take a look at the coverage below: By: Governor Tom Wolf’s Office of Communications Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: From lagging to leading: Doctors group says PA is now a trailblazer in opioid response“As Pennsylvania gave away the overdose reversal drug naloxone at dozens of locations across the state Thursday, its response to the opioid epidemic won praise from the American Medical Association in a first-of-its-kind report.The state announced Friday that 80 sites distributed a total of 6,105 kits of naloxone Thursday, including 926 in Allegheny County, which trailed top-giver Philadelphia by just 101 kits. Beaver County distributed 42 kits, Butler 66, Westmoreland 127 and Washington 57.It was a day that would have been hard to imagine as recently as 2016, when Pennsylvania lagged behind in almost every conceivable measure in addressing the issue. Now, just two years removed from having neither an effective prescription drug monitoring program nor any official prescribing guidelines, the state is being lauded as a trailblazer.Officials from the AMA and the Pennsylvania Medical Society deemed the state a model in its approach to increasing access to treatment for addiction, enhancing access to naloxone and providing comprehensive care to patients with pain.”The Tribune-Democrat: State’s response to opioid crisis could be model, AMA finds“Pennsylvania has become a national leader in getting insurers to make it easier for people with addiction get access to treatment.That’s the conclusion of an American Medical Association (AMA) report analyzing the state’s response to the opioid epidemic released Thursday.”The Erie Times: Our View: Wolf’s Opioid Leadership Stands Out“It is not exactly a traditional holiday giveaway. Gov. Tom Wolf’s administration is stepping forward not with turkeys or toys, but with a sobering gift that could prove lifesaving.”Associated Press: Thousands of anti-overdose kits handed out in Pennsylvania“Pennsylvania officials say thousands of kits of the anti-overdose medication naloxone have been distributed in a statewide effort designed to prevent opioid deaths.The Health Department said demand for the handouts at government offices on Thursday caused dozens of locations to run out of the drug.”Chambersburg Public Opinion: Health centers distribute free naloxone supply in 4 hours“More than 40 locations where the state distributed free naloxone Thursday ran out of the overdose reversal medication halfway through the eight-hour distribution period.The Chambersburg location ran out within two hours.”The Daily Item: Free naloxone just part of next step“In another attempt at slowing the raging drug epidemic in Pennsylvania, state officials have designated this week Stop Overdoses in PA: Get Help Now Week. Among the projects highlighted this week is a plan to hand out free naxolone kits — a medication that has proven effective in reversing the effects of opioid overdoses — to anyone who wants one on Thursday.”center_img Experts Say Wolf Administration’s Opioid Epidemic Response Could Be National Model (Round-Up) SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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