2 dead including suspect in shooting at Texas church

first_imgiStock(DALLAS) — At least one victim was killed and four others were injured when a gunman opened fire inside a crowded Texas church on Sunday morning before he was shot to death by an armed security guard, officials told ABC News.The shooting occurred at 10:57 a.m. at the West Freeway Church of Christ in the Fort Worth suburb of White Settlement and was captured on the church’s livestream of the service, officials said.The federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives tweeted that they had a team “en route to a reported shooting at the West Freeway Church of Christ in White Settlement, Texas.”Three people were taken to hospitals, including one who remained in critical condition. Another victim died en route to the hospital, officials said.The shooter, whose name was not immediately released, was pronounced dead at the scene, according to a spokeswoman at MedStar Hospital in Fort Worth.Two other people suffered minor injuries when they hit their heads attempting to flee the church, officials said.“Our hearts go out to the victims and families of those killed in the evil act of violence that occurred at the West Freeway Church of Christ,” Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said in a statement. “Places of worship are meant to be sacred, and I am grateful for the church members who acted quickly to take down the shooter and help prevent further loss of life.”The church service was going on when the gunman appeared to stand up and confront an usher, according to the livestream video.The footage shows the gunman wearing a long coat taking a step back before pulling what appeared to be a shotgun from his coat and firing point-blank on the usher and another member of the congregation. A security guard standing near the front door of the church returned fire, hitting the suspect, according to the video.As chaos erupted, members of the congregation ducked under pews as others who appeared to be armed rushed toward the gunman, the video shows.“Everything is under control. Our security team did everything they needed to do,” a church leader is heard in the livestream telling terrified members of the congregation.The church leaders urged everyone to stay calm and file out of the sanctuary.“We had a gentleman that came in armed to do harm,” the church leader says in the footage.Church members can be heard screaming and crying in the livestream, including one person who yelled, “I love you.”“Our hearts and prayers go out to all the families that were affected by this incident,” said Fort Worth police spokesman Mike Drivdahl at a news conference.Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton tweeted his office will assist in the investigation if needed.This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Police kept busy this weekend with crashes on I-94, Toll Road

first_img Police kept busy this weekend with crashes on I-94, Toll Road (Photo supplied/Indiana State Police) A medical chopper was called to an injury crash on Saturday afternoon, May 9, on I-94, near the Michigan State Line. A Toyota Highlander was at stopped due to a construction backup. A Honda Odyssey, was slowing to stop behind the Toyota when the driver was rear-ended by a Volkswagen. One driver was flown to South Bend Memorial Hospital for non-life threatening injuries. The other drivers refused treatment.(Photo supplied/Indiana State Police)A woman riding in a car was airlifted to the hospital after a crash on the Indiana Toll Road. It happened early Saturday morning, May 9, near mile marker 59. The woman was ejected from the vehicle, which police say was traveling at a high rate of speed, when it left the passing lane, drove off the right side of the roadway and overturned. The driver of the vehicle refused medical treatment at the scene. Twitter Pinterest Google+ Pinterest Facebook IndianaLocalNews WhatsApp WhatsApp By Jon Zimney – May 10, 2020 0 401 Twitter Facebook Previous articleThree Oaks woman seriously injured in crash in Weesaw TownshipNext articlePlan to reopen County-City Building getting underway Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Google+last_img read more

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Marilyn Manson Cast As Guest Star For HBO’s ‘The New Pope’

first_img[H/T Variety] Marilyn Manson will appear as a fictional character in the upcoming second season of HBO’s 2017 religious drama series, Young Pope.Rebranded as, The New Pope for its second season,  Manson will be joined by John Malkovich and Sharon Stone as some of the notable guest stars on the follow up to the acclaimed 2017 HBO series when it returns sometime later this year. Manson’s list of acting credits includes limited roles on shows like Sons of Anarchy and Eastbound & Down.Related: The Hollywood Vampires Joined By Steven Tyler, Marilyn Manson At Los Angeles’ Greek TheatreAccording to reports, the specifics of Manson’s role and character are unclear at the moment, but the principle photography for the second season has already been completed. On Friday, a photo of Manson was one of two shared by HBO to its Twitter account depicting the three new guest stars for the coming season. Stone and Malkovich are both seen together in what appears to be each of their character’s wardrobes. Manson is dressed pretty close to what he might wear on any given day, adding to more mystery behind what his appearance on the show will entail.The show’s first season closely followed Jude Law as the newly-appointed Pope Pius XIII as head of The Vatican and the modern day Catholic church.Fans can catch Manson in venues across North America all summer alongside Rob Zombie with their co-headlining Twins of Evil: Hell Never Dies Tour set to begin on July 9th in Baltimore. Tickets for Zombie and Manson’s summer tour are on sale now at Live Nation.last_img read more

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What they’re reading

first_imgCharles Ogletree, Jesse Climenko Professor of Law at Harvard Law School (Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer)Jesse Climenko Professor of Law, and director of the Charles Hamilton Houston Institute for Race and Justice“The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama” “Gwen Ifill’s ‘The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama’ charts the progress of the new African-American politicians, all born following the early years of the Civil Rights struggles, and how this new generation of leaders emerged.”“The Bridge: The Life and Rise of Barack Obama” “ ‘The Bridge: The Life and Rise of Barack Obama’ by David Remnick traces President Obama’s path to the White House and how he overcame a host of challenges during the campaign.”“Known to Evil” “Walter Mosley has written many mysteries, and I have probably read them all. In ‘Known to Evil,’ he introduces us to Leonid McGill, a new character in New York City who’s trying to track down a mysterious woman.”Lene HauLene V. Hau, Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and of Applied Physics (Justin Ide/Harvard Staff Photographer)Mallinckrodt Professor of Physics and of Applied Physics“The Selfish Gene” “Richard Dawkins’ ‘The Selfish Gene’ is one of these rare gems of a book that leaves you with a different perspective of the world after you’ve read it. Dawkins presents a convincing case for his claim that all species of life seem optimized for one purpose: survival of their DNA. Many of the statements in the book at first encounter seem ludicrous, but Dawkins then goes on to present a wonderfully surprising and convincing argument for his point.”“In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind” “ ‘In Search of Memory: The Emergence of a New Science of Mind’ by Eric Kandel describes the history of neuroscience and the amazing discoveries made over the past century. We learn how studies of the workings of the mind moved from psychology over biochemistry to gene manipulation and single neuron measurements. It is really by putting all these measurements and observations together that a real understanding of memory function — how memory is formed and recalled — is achieved. Such studies might lead us more broadly to some understanding of consciousness: how we think and behave.”“When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present” ‘The development of women’s status, options, and possibilities in society over the past 50 years is chronicled in ‘When Everything Changed: The Amazing Journey of American Women from 1960 to the Present.’ Author Gail Collins describes the great progress that’s been achieved, but also how we are currently, in some ways, moving backward. She reminds us that achieving equal opportunity for women requires women’s actual inclusion in the workplace community rather than just an increased number of women hired. Whereas the latter is important, continuous attention must be paid to the former. Collins writes about these issues with great insight and a sense of humor that I just really enjoy.”Alan Dershowitz Alan Dershowitz, Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law (Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer)Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law“Start-up Nation: The Story of Israel’s Economic Miracle” “ ‘Start-up Nation: The Story of Israel’s Economic Miracle’ by Dan Senor and Saul Singer tells the story of how Israel changed from a second economy based on agriculture and tourism to a first-world economic superpower, based completely on high-tech innovation. It’s a story that will inspire students, faculty, and alumni.”“36 Arguments for the Existence of God: A Work of Fiction” “Rebecca Goldstein’s new novel, ‘36 Arguments for the Existence of God: A Work of Fiction,’ is poignant, funny, and brilliant. It’s about the clash between religious fundamentalism and intellectual skepticism, but is about much more as well. A great read!”Diane PaulusDiane Paulus, the director of the American Repertory Theater (Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer)Artistic director, American Repertory Theater; professor of the practice of theater“Odysseus in America: Combat Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming” “Jonathan Shay’s study of Homer’s ‘Odyssey’ is inspiring me to think about all the ways the ancient Greek texts can speak to the experiences of active-duty soldiers, veterans, military families, and civilians today.  As I plan the A.R.T.’s Greek festival for the 2010-11 season, I am programming productions, readings, and panel discussions that will give audiences many opportunities to participate in civic dialogues about the challenges our nation and world are facing.”“Shut Out: A Story of Race and Baseball in Boston” “While rehearsing ‘Johnny Baseball,’ the new musical about the Boston Red Sox, I’ve been reading ‘Shut Out: A Story of Race and Baseball in Boston,’ a powerful book by sports journalist Howard Bryant.  A detailed analysis of racial prejudice in major league baseball, ‘Shut Out’ examines critical moments in Red Sox history, including the decision not to sign Jackie Robinson in 1945 and the team’s signing of Pumpsie Green in 1959. A fascinating exploration of the history of a baseball team, a city, and the nation.”Mohsen MostafaviGraduate School of Design Dean Mohsen Mostafavi (Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer)Dean of the Graduate School of Design; Alexander and Victoria Wiley Professor of Design“The Indian Bride” “I usually have numerous writing deadlines, and so my reading tends to be very instrumental, focused on what I am going to write. But, like most people, I also read to switch off — to get away from the stress of deadlines. Detective stories seem to do the trick best. I recently read ‘The Indian Bride,’ an Inspector Sejer mystery by the Norwegian writer Karin Fossum. It takes place in an isolated village where a quiet agricultural machinery salesman decides to travel to Mumbai to bring back an Indian bride — hence the title. Fossum’s subtle description of the Norwegian landscape, the humility of the main character, and the guardedness of the members of the community against all outsiders are chillingly revealing.”“Ill Fares the Land” “Like many people, I’ve been riveted by the incredible short pieces in the ‘New York Review of Books’ by the British historian Tony Judt, who is paralyzed from the neck down with Lou Gehrig’s disease; he is able to speak but not write. Judt has an astonishing capacity to construct such concise sentences, actually whole articles, in his head. He has just published ‘Ill Fares the Land,’ a book based on the NYR articles. Judt’s reminiscences deal a lot with his life in England, and having spent a large part of my life there too, I am very sensitive — almost nostalgic — about many of his period pieces, such as the ghastly description of the hovercraft, which I remember taking to a cold and remote school on the Isle of Wight as a boy in the 1960s.”“The Country Formerly Known as Great Britain” “Maybe to get over the sense of nostalgia, or just to extend it, I am now reading ‘The Country Formerly Known as Great Britain’ by Ian Jack. Jack, who now writes for the Guardian newspaper, used to edit the literary magazine Granta. There are certain parallels between these last two books in their consideration of a time gone by, of a Britain that now exists only in memory. Jack’s writing is always such a pleasure to read.”“The Arts of Industry in the Age of Enlightenment” “On the work front, we have recently announced a new graduate program at the Graduate School of Design on art, design, and the public domain. In part, inspired by this topic, I have started reading Celina Fox’s impressive new book, ‘The Arts of Industry in the Age of Enlightenment.’ “David GergenDavid Gergen Public service professor at Harvard Kennedy School (Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer)Public service professor at Harvard Kennedy School, and director, Center for Public Leadership“Churchill” “In times like these, my reading often turns to leaders of the past who have led democracies out of peril. Of late, I have been tackling a brace of new books about Churchill, and enjoying them all. Paul Johnson’s biography, ‘Churchill,’ is the best of the lot: insightful, concise, and graphic — enough so that I have sent it to friends.”“The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine” “Meanwhile, I’ve been struggling with a stack of books about the roots of our economic turmoil. Michael Lewis has once again weighed in with one of the most readable, ‘The Big Short: Inside the Doomsday Machine’; Andrew Ross Sorkin’s ‘Too Big To Fail’ looks like a must — and yet is forbiddingly long. I have found refuge in thinking more about where we go from here. Even if a bit repetitive, I found some provocative answers in Richard Florida’s new work, ‘The Great Reset.’”“Still Surprised: A Memoir of a Life in Leadership” and “Susan” “But the most satisfying books of the season are by dear friends. Warren Bennis has just completed his memoir, ‘Still Surprised: A Memoir of a Life in Leadership.’ And when it appears in print soon, readers will find it a delightful intellectual romp through the flowering of social science … after World War II, as well as a meditation on leadership. The other is a soulful work, beautifully written and inspiring, by Susan Tifft. She waged a noble struggle against cancer, captivating legions of friends old and new with her blog entries on CaringBridge.org. At her services at Memorial Church, her husband Alex Jones gave a bound copy to each of those who filled the pews. It is titled simply, ‘Susan’ and, like her, is a treasure.” Cherry A. MurrayDean of the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, and John A. and Elizabeth S. Armstrong Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences and professor of physics“The Siege of Krishnapur” “I am a huge fan of historical fiction. In ‘The Siege of Krishnapur,’ J.G. Farrell, an Irish writer who had a rather short life, crafted a stylish novel echoing (well, mocking) the British colonial novel style. It’s written from the perspective of colonists living in a remote outpost (a fictional town in India). It pokes incredible fun at the British, and it was one of the first books to send up the absurdity of colonial arrogance. Farrell goes into great detail in describing the native personalities and invites the reader to watch as a once prim Victorian outpost devolves into chaos during a siege. Incredibly funny, with good character building.”New Crobuzon trilogy “My daughter and I have swapped our way through China Mieville’s New Crobuzon trilogy (‘Perdido Street Station,’ ‘The Scar,’ and ‘Iron Council’) of science fiction / fantasy books (and I just finished ‘Iron Council’). The sheer inventiveness of Mieville is astounding, from all different civilizations and cultures to the mosquito-like creatures and the entire cast of ‘remades’ (mixed up mechanical and biological life forms). His writing has a definite atmosphere about it. I found the idea of an entirely movable, floating city of interconnected ships in ‘The Scar’ (called the Armada) to be very cool. While the ending of the series is incredibly frustrating, the sheer breadth, amazing wordplay, atmosphere, and energy make the ride worthwhile. And don’t worry … our bioengineers will not be doing this type of thing!”“The Logic of Failure: Recognizing and Avoiding Error in Complex Situations” “ ‘The Logic of Failure: Recognizing and Avoiding Error in Complex Situations’ by Dietrich Dörner is a management book that has relevance to engineering design. A German psychologist with an interest in early game theory, Dörner basically asked why some leaders fail. By using a ‘paper’ version of SimCity, he concluded that what leads to failure is when a leader asks a whole lot of questions, but never makes any decisions, or when a leader has a preconceived notion of what is right and does it regardless of what anyone else says. I’ve taken Dörner’s insights to heart with my own strategic planning for SEAS. To be successful, you need to ask a few questions, pick a track, and then monitor how things are going (getting feedback as you go). You also have to be very clear about how you define success.”Charles Ogletreecenter_img A survey of top Harvard faculty shows what books they’re reading and enjoying on summer’s edge.last_img read more

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The newest live in the oldest

first_imgWhen Tom Keefe received his Harvard dorm assignment this summer he was perplexed.“What’s Massachusetts Hall?” the freshman from Sherborn, Mass., wondered. While he had heard about Lionel, Holworthy, Mower, and Weld halls, he had heard nothing about this one.But Keefe quickly realized “this one was a lot different.”The oldest building at Harvard and the second oldest-academic building in the country (William & Mary’s Sir Christopher Wren Building in Virginia holds that title), Massachusetts Hall was built in 1720 to meet the growing need for residential space at Harvard College.The top floor of Mass Hall, as it is commonly known, is still used as a dorm for a small group of students. The remainder of the building serves as office space for Harvard’s top administrators.Fourteen freshmen, a mix of young men and young women from across the globe, spend their first year at Harvard living three floors above the University president’s office.In keeping with its close-knit, community feel, on a recent Thursday evening four generations of Mass Hall students gathered in the slightly larger space offered by the neighboring Straus Hall and its common room for an informal reunion.Over pizza and cookies, the students compared notes about their time in the historic building. They laughed about their attempts to find a way into the attic, the spirits that supposedly haunt the hall, and their mythic status on campus.Former Mass Hall resident senior Athena Lao recalled two incredulous students who materialized on the building’s top floor one evening during a study break. The pair had snuck in and climbed the four flights of stairs on a vital fact-finding mission.“They said, ‘Hi, we were just wondering if you were real,’” recounted Lao.For Lao, the dorm offered lasting connections. She still resides with two students she met while living there, and for the past three years she has been a peer advising fellow (PAF), a type of mentor for new Harvard College students. She said she requested a PAF appointment there so she could “keep helping out future Mass Hall residents.“There’s just a lot of community spirit that builds there, and that’s just a powerful and wonderful thing to have when you are starting out.”One of the highlights for the residents of the small entryway is the annual dinner they get to enjoy with Harvard President Drew Faust on the hall’s first floor. This year the menu featured tacos and tortillas, brownies and lemon squares, and casual conversation including topics like the students’ classes, their impressions of Harvard, and whether or not they felt homesick.Though he was a little intimidated at first to be dining with the head of the University, freshman George Doran said Faust’s casual demeanor helped everyone loosen up and enjoy the evening.“It was kind of fun to really … see the nonbusiness side of the president.”On a steamy move-in day in late August, Keefe was given a list of residents who had previously lived in his room. His sheet ticked back to 1939.“It’s cool,” Keefe said of his new abode. “There are only 14 kids, there’s amazing history, and we are on the top floor.” He and new roommate Doran already had bonded over common interests, including a Nintendo 64 video game and the need for a tall floor fan, which they purchased right after they moved in.The co-ed mini-dorm is a mix of doubles and singles. Its wooden floors have long been covered with carpet, its many fireplaces boarded up. The rooms are furnished with standard-issue bunk beds, and unremarkable desks and chairs. But the rooms have ample space, are sunny and bright, and have peaked ceilings that add a historic charm.Instead of missing the exposure that a large dorm can offer, Mass Hall students say they are in contact with a diverse range of residents, from athletes to artists, to would-be engineers, scientists, and doctors. The area’s small size, with one simple, long corridor, they agree, gives the space an intimate feel.“You get to know each other so well that you become a family,” said senior Cristina Alcorta, a former Mass Hall freshman and current peer advising fellow for students in the dorm, who still has many close friends from her own Mass Hall days.Susan Cheng, the Mass Hall proctor, likes the small dorm. “I feel like as a proctor in Mass Hall I can really get to know my students very well. I see them every day, so it’s easier to keep in touch with the day-to-day developments of their lives,” said Cheng, a student in the Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Ed.L.D. program who is entering her second year at the dorm.As proctor, Cheng organizes regular social gatherings and study breaks for the students and helps connect them with mentors from across the University.“Community building and making Mass Hall like home is very important to me.”Mass Hall has been transformed several times over the centuries. The building was somewhat less ornate following its use as a garrison for soldiers in the Continental Army during the Revolutionary War, when much of the interior woodwork and brass hardware went missing.In the 1800s half of the dorm rooms were converted to recitation rooms. Later, the dorms were removed entirely, to make way for lecture halls, offices, and reading rooms. In the 1900s, Mass Hall housed an informal observatory, and the precursor to the modern laboratory (the “Apparatus Chamber” that included equipment acquired by Benjamin Franklin). Following a fire in 1924, the building was converted back to a dorm. In 1939 the lower floors were converted to office space.Early Georgian in style with a simple construction, symmetry, and modest accents, the building has a special lore on campus. Its famous undergraduate residents include Founding Father John Adams, and curious students have been known to try to sneak into the basement looking for the spot where the second U.S. president allegedly scrawled his name on the wall. They haven’t found it yet.Then there’s the “ghost.” On windy nights, the attic floorboards creak and groan. Some listeners attribute it to the weather; others may wonder if the spirit of some alumnus is floating around the eaves and chimneys. They haven’t found it yet, either.But much of the lore surrounds the students themselves. There’s a running joke on campus that spotting a student from Mass Hall is as rare as seeing a unicorn trot in front of John Harvard’s statue, a common refrain from some of the tour guides passing beneath their windows. To combat the rumor, one student made T-shirts for the residents, with the Mass Hall mascot, a golden-horned unicorn, emblazoned on the front.As he settled in after carting his belongings up four flights of narrow stairs to his new room, Keefe was sanguine about living just above the heart of Harvard’s power. “It’s very nice,” he said, offering Faust an open invitation: “She is always welcome to come up and listen to music with me.”last_img read more

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08 Easy chives

first_imgBy Wayne McLaurin Georgia Extension Service Chives grow wild in Italy and Greece and probably came with the explorers to the New World.About chivesPerennial plants that belong to the onion family, they’re grown throughout most of North America and will thrive in all of Georgia.The small, bulbous plants grow in clumps 8 to 12 inches high. Their attractive violet-colored or white flowers are eaten in salads.Common chives (Allium shoenoprasum) are grass-like plants with mild onion flavor — small, dainty onions that grow in clumps to about 10 inches high. They have hollow stems with light lavender flowers. With a very compact growth habit (excellent for a border planting), common chives also grow well indoors over winter.Garlic chives (Allium tuberosum) are broader-leaved than common chives, with a flavor midway between garlic and onion. Garlic chives resemble common chives in clump-growth habit. But they have flat, dark green leaves and white flowers. The leaves are prized as a fresh product. Garlic chives can get out of bounds, since they reseed easily.Propagation, harvesting and useThe plants are usually propagated by dividing the clumps, keeping four to six bulblets per clump. Plant them in the same way as onion transplants, and divide them in the fall or early spring every two to three years to prevent overcrowding. Chives may also be started with seeds planted in the early spring.Constant harvesting of the leaves is essential to keep the plants healthy and vigorous. The tender leaves or entire plants may be harvested whenever you want them during the season. The bulbs are not used.Some gardeners dry the leaves. Others chop them up fresh and keep them in the freezer for winter use. Many gardeners dig a clump of chives in late fall, place them in a pot and bring them in the house for fresh use during the winter.They’re easily grown in gardens and do exceptionally well in pots or other containers. Volume XXVII Number 1 Page 8 last_img read more

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Jim Blaine was right: credit union marketing adds no value

first_imgI recently saw an article written by Jim Blaine, the CEO of the $28 billion State Employees’ Credit Union, in which he shares his perspective on credit union marketing. It took me a while to form an opinion on his perspective when he noted, “Credit union marketing adds no appreciable value to the movement.”At first, I wanted to call BS on Jim.“Of course, marketing adds value,” I thought. “He’s got it all wrong.”But after reading his article through a second time I believe that Jim is right.Regardless, his perspective confirms our findings that CEOs don’t trust marketing. And that is a big problem.The good news for both CEOs and marketers is this problem can be fixed.It’s Business (And Marketing) as Usual Marketers are often viewed as the ones who play with paint and crayons all day. And in the past, this probably was true at many organizations. However, I believe that with proper training and guidance, modern digital-focused marketers can gain credibility with their CEO.But this will take much more work than what many credit union marketers are doing today as they continue to operate, and market, the status quo. This shortcoming, though, is not entirely a marketer’s fault.There are a two main reasons I believe credit union marketers are slow to make the evolution to a digital-focused modern marketer.Marketers fear failure due to past experiences with their CEO.Marketers are too busy with the daily tasks to learn new digital marketing methods.These points are confirmed in a study conducted by Adobe. In fact, Adobe found less than half (48%) of marketers, who consider themselves primarily digital marketers, feel highly proficient in digital marketing.Furthermore, a majority of digital marketers haven’t received any formal training in digital marketing, and 82% reported having to learn on the job. Finally, a strong majority (76%) of marketers think marketing has changed more in the past two years than in the past 50 years.For credit union marketers to find success, they must be supported by their CEO and encouraged to learn new marketing methods while accepting that failure is part of the learning process.Marketers Attack As expected, heated comments from marketers began to come into Jim’s blog post.He expanded upon his thoughts to those who commented including Rich Jones.To Rich, Jim replied,“I’m trying to provoke you and your ‘ilk’ to a greater, more difficult challenge… to explain, market, educate, convince members/public that CUs really are something different!We’re losing the ‘war’…. we really are… all of us. As you point out, so many members are still ‘going astray’ much to their financial detriment. I’m tired of losing, aren’t you?Why should we have to defend ourselves against the banks given their recent actions and attitude toward accountability to the American citizenry?Why aren’t we being carried through the streets on the shoulders of consumers as the white knights, the answer to their financial despair?”Jim continued sharing his perspective on marketing to an anonymous poster.“If CU marketing is so wonderful then why are payday lenders growing faster in your market than your CU? Why is the CU marketing message being ignored… or worse not believed?”While Jim’s article was satirical in nature, I believe the questions he asks are valid. Every marketer should pause and ask themselves the following three questions:What am I doing to move the needle?How am I differentiating my credit union from other financial institutions?What would happen to my credit union if my job did not exist?The Big Problem: Everyone Tells the Same StoryFinancial services are commoditized, and almost every single bank or credit union is telling the same story by promoting the same three things:We have great rates.We have amazing service.And we have an undifferentiated list of product features.And this is exactly where the opportunity lies for marketers.This kind of “logical” marketing focuses on a consumer’s left side, or analytical side, of their brain. However, consumers buy with their hearts, using the emotive right side of the brain, and then justify that purchase with their mind, the left side of the brain.To be clear, in no way am I advocating for marketers to manipulate a consumer and encourage them to make a purchase they really don’t need.What I am advocating for, however, is for credit unions to stop promoting “great rates and amazing service” like everyone else and start telling stories that sell.The Solution: Tell Stories That Sell Marketing drives sales. Sales drive growth. But the way marketing has been implemented by banks and credit unions the past 30 years is no longer applicable.Marketing is about defining the narrative, and it is time for credit unions to tell a new one. One that puts members and consumers back at the heart of the stories being told.I do believe there is still hope for credit unions to tell stories that sell.But they must stop trying to be the hero in the stories they tell and embrace the role of the helpful guide. Because, without a guide, there is no hero, there is no hope, and there is no story.For example, without Obi-wan, there is no Luke. Without Gandalf, no Frodo. Without your credit union, what hope do consumers, and your members, have for the future? And without marketing, what hope does your credit union, or CEO, have for the future? 109SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,James Robert Lay JAMES ROBERT LAY is one of the world’s leading digital marketing authors, speakers, and advisors for financial brands. As the founder and CEO of the Digital Growth Institute, he … Web: https://www.digitalgrowth.com Detailslast_img read more

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Tech Time: How to build a proactive data security plan

first_imgWhen Canada’s largest credit union experienced a massive data breach in December 2018, the story quickly gained momentum. As the press reported on the incident, it was discovered that the breach was larger than initially expected, impacting all 4.2 million customers. Although the credit union took decisive action, they had to combat months of fallout from press coverage and work overtime to regain consumer confidence.The highly sensitive nature of financial information makes credit unions an attractive target for malicious actors, and vulnerabilities within a credit union’s operations can allow unintentional privacy violations as well as identity theft. To counter threats to your members’ data, you need more than cybersecurity policies. You need good cyber defense.Many businesses look to regulations like the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act and such security requirements as Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard for guidance in safeguarding sensitive information. While certifications like these are extremely important, businesses also need to actively prevent, detect and respond to security incidents. To mount an effective cyber defense, make sure these six elements are in your arsenal: threat intelligence and risk assessment, incident response, continuous monitoring, access control, security awareness training and communication. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

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Tesco closes in on Streatham ice rink

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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Ibrahimovic extends AC Milan contract for 2020/21 season

first_imgAccording to Italian media reports, Ibrahimovic has agreed a seven-million-euro ($8.35-million) annual salary with Milan.He helped Pioli’s side bounce back from a poor first half of last season, scoring 11 goals in 20 games in all competitions to help fire the seven-time European champions to Europa League qualification.Ibrahimovic said at the weekend that he “wanted to help the club return to where they belong”.”For six months, we have done great things but we have not won anything. We must continue and do the same,” he said in a video. Veteran striker Zlatan Ibrahimovic has signed a one-year contract extension with AC Milan, the Italian giants announced on Monday.The former Swedish international, who turns 39 in October, rejoined Milan in January and will stay at the San Siro until the end of June 2021.”Today [Monday], Zlatan Ibrahimovic rejoined his teammates and coach Stefano Pioli at Milanello Sports Center, where he took part in his first training session of the season,” the club said in a statement. Topics :center_img The 38-year-old previously played for the Rossoneri from 2010-2012, scoring 56 goals and winning the 2011 Serie A title under Massimiliano Allegri.It had been widely expected that ‘Ibra’ would sign a new deal and he will take the number 11 shirt, having played as Milan’s number 21 last term.He had returned from American MLS outfit Los Angeles Galaxy on a six-month contract with an optional extra year.Milan finished last season with a 12-match unbeaten streak in Serie A to grab a sixth-place finish, although they still fell short of returning to the Champions League for the first time since 2014.Ibrahimovic has also played for Juventus and Inter Milan in Italy during his illustrious career and starred for Paris Saint-Germain in France and Manchester United in the Premier League.He won four Ligue 1 titles with PSG during a four-year spell in which he became the club’s record goalscorer, a mantle since taken by Edinson Cavani.’Ibra’ has also lifted the La Liga trophy with Barcelona in 2010, three league titles with Inter and two Eredivisie crowns while at Ajax.last_img read more

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