Average estate agency fee rises by £532 to £4,152 per sale since 2014, data suggests

first_imgHome » News » Housing Market » Average estate agency fee rises by £532 to £4,152 per sale since 2014, data suggests previous nextHousing MarketAverage estate agency fee rises by £532 to £4,152 per sale since 2014, data suggestsPrices have increased by 0.9% this month, pushed up sharp rises in the prime market across the UK, Rightmove’s monthly index reveals.Nigel Lewis20th May 20190931 Views The average asking price of a house in the UK has increased by £40,000 over the past five years delivering a revenue increase of £536 on average per sale for estate agents, the latest housing market data suggests.This increase is part of the latest Rightmove monthly property market update which shows that asking prices increased by 0.9% this month driven mostly by a leap of 2.6% at the top of the property ladder.The average house price has increased from £268,000 to £308,000 since 2014 which, based on a 1.4% average commission rate and a price achieved ratio of 96.3%, means agents received £4,152 per sale inclusive of VAT.RegionsRightmove says four out of eleven regions in the UK are ‘bucking any Brexit blues’ including Wales, the West and East Midlands and the North West.But the property market remains soft elsewhere where the number of homes coming to market dropped by 6.5% during May, although average stock per agent increased during April to 50 per branch.“Price increases are the norm at this time of year, with only one fall in the last ten years, as new-to-the-market sellers’ price aspirations are under-pinned by the higher buyer demand that is a feature of the spring market,” says Miles Shipside (right), Rightmove’s housing market analyst.“The 0.9% monthly rise is consistent with the previous two years’ average rise of 1.0% over the same period.“What will seem inconsistent to some, given the ongoing uncertainty of the Brexit outcome, is that four out of eleven regions have hit record highs for new seller asking prices.”Nationally, the Spring market effect is apparent with ‘time to sell’ dipping from 89 days four months ago to 74 days during April.Rightmove fees and asking prices May 20, 2019Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles Letting agent fined £11,500 over unlicenced rent-to-rent HMO3rd May 2021 BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021last_img read more

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Turkey:”Big E” Docks in Marmaris Bay

first_img Share this article Turkey:”Big E” Docks in Marmaris Bay Back to overview,Home naval-today Turkey:”Big E” Docks in Marmaris Bay View post tag: Naval View post tag: Bay February 8, 2011 US aircraft carrier USS Enterprise on Tuesday docked in the southwestern Turkish bay of Marmaris amidst strict security measures…[mappress]Source: todayszaman, February 8, 2011; View post tag: docks View post tag: Big E View post tag: Navy View post tag: Marmarislast_img

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HMAS Darwin sailors exercise Freedom of Entry

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today HMAS Darwin sailors exercise Freedom of Entry HMAS Darwin sailors exercise Freedom of Entry Share this article July 7, 2016 Proudly bearing the name “Darwin”, more than 200 officers and sailors from the Royal Australian Navy have marched through the City of Darwin, exercising their Freedom of Entry.The time honoured tradition coincides with the first port visit in Australia after a six month deployment to the Middle-East.Commanding Officer HMAS Darwin Commander Phillip Henry said the march was a great source of pride for the ship’s company.“After six months away from family and friends, to say we have been anticipating this moment is an understatement,” Commander Henry said.HMAS Darwin was deployed to the Middle-East as part of Operation MANITOU, the ADF’s contribution in support of international efforts to promote maritime security, stability and prosperity in the Middle East Region.During this deployment, the seventh time HMAS Darwin has served in the Middle-East, the ship intercepted a large cache of illegally smuggled small arms weaponry and disrupted a number of narcotic smuggling operations.The ship’s company marched down Knuckey Street, where they were challenged by the Lord Mayor of Darwin, The Right Honourable Ms Katrina Fong Lim, at the Darwin Town Hall with the Freedom of Entry heartily granted.The tradition of Freedom of Entry dates back to the 11th century, when a city trained soldiers for defensive measures and city protection. Freedom of Entry was rigorously controlled by the city leaders as a measure of precaution rather than an act of grace.In modern times the granting of Freedom of Entry bestows no legal right or privilege on the recipient body, but it is accepted that the conferment is the most honourable distinction the City can give.center_img View post tag: HMAS Darwin View post tag: Freedom of Entry Authoritieslast_img read more

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In Short

first_imgBSB golf day detailsThe British Society of Baking annual golf day is at Marriott Forest of Arden Golf and Country Club in Meriden, Warwickshire, on Monday 9 May from 12.30pm. Golfers get to play the course and enjoy a three-course evening meal for £130. Contact Keith Houliston on 01869 247098 or [email protected] for more details.Free skills conferenceA free conference, Attracting Talent and Increasing Productivity, is a to take place on Wednesday 23 March. Organised by the National Skills Academy for Food & Drink and the Food & Drink Federation in partnership with Improve, the food and drink skills council, the conference will provide a platform to discuss skills, training and careers development. To book a free place and get full details of the agenda, contact Laura Kemsley at [email protected] supplementIn response to the rising trend for home baking, Sainsbury’s is to give away a 24-page Cakes and Cookies supplement in the April issue of its magazine.New site for SpoonerSpooner Industries has launched a new fully interactive website www.spooner.co.uk which will be available in 50 languages. It provides information on its custom-built provers, ovens and coolers and will be updated on a weekly basis with product news, case studies and company events.Price amendmentCorrection: In the story ’Short stocks force sugar suppliers to raise prices’ in the 25 February issue of British Baker, the Tate & Lyle price increase should have read 176m/t not 125m/t.last_img read more

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Young Pastry Chef of the Year revealed

first_imgTwenty-one-year-old Holly Woodman from the Claire Clark Academy has been crowned Young Pastry Chef of the Year.In the annual competition run by Master Chefs of Great Britain, Woodman competed with seven entrants from across the UK.To enter, applicants were required to submit dish names, recipes, methods, trimmings and costings for a hot soufflé with accompaniments, a plated restaurant dish and a variety of shortbread.Finalists prepared and presented their offerings in three hours at the Claire Clarke Academy, after which their menus were judged by a panel of notable pastry chefs.Woodman’s winning set included: chocolate and pistachio soufflé with chocolate sauce and crumb, followed by a tropical fruit dessert with white chocolate collars, mango mousse and coconut sorbet, plus a selection of whole shortbread and orange shortbread petit fours.News of the victory was “completely unexpected”, as Woodman had only been learning professionally for six months, although she has previously completed work experience with pastry catering business Pretty Sweet.“Being up against chefs who have done competitions before and work in kitchens, compared to me who works in a shop and trains two days a week, it still feels like a dream,” she said.“I went into the competition focused and gave everything I could.”Prizes for her victory included: trips to two events organised by the Master Chefs of Great Britain, a visit to the Koppert Cress herb nursery in Holland, a roll of chef’s knives, £250 in cash and work experience with famous pastry chef Laurent Duchêne at his patisserie in Paris.“Holly held her own amongst some professional pastry chefs with far more experience than her,” commented Andrea Ruff, Woodman’s mentor and course team leader.“She completed on time, her working methods and hygiene throughout the three-hour competition were second to none, she was so focused.”Run by Bake Off Crème de la Crème judge Claire Clark, the academy offers a range of patisserie courses and runs a state-of-the-art pastry kitchen.Woodman is currently studying the Level 2 Bakery & Patisserie full-time course – which is located at Milton Keynes college – and will be starting her Level 3 patisserie course later in the year.She plans to hone her skills in a hotel patisserie while studying for her next qualification.last_img read more

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Being black in Western art

first_imgHow have people of African descent been depicted in Western art and why? A comprehensive research project and photo archive at Harvard’s W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research seek to answer those sweeping questions.“The Image of the Black in Western Art” is based in the efforts of the French couple John and Dominique De Menil, human rights champions, art enthusiasts, and philanthropists who, reacting to U.S. segregation in the 1960s, began the process of documenting the depiction of individuals of African ancestry in the West, creating a five-volume series of illustrated works.In 1994 their project was handed over to the Du Bois Institute, which now houses the archive of 26,000 photographs of artworks in all media, and offers expanded access to outside researchers. The institute and the Harvard University Press are collaborating on updates of the five original books, and on five additional ones.Calling the reissue of the originals and the new volumes a “historic event,” Vera Grant, the institute’s executive director, said the works include updated color photographs of the previous mostly black-and-white images, as well as new scholarly research and commentary.“Everything that’s in the books has been ramped up to another level,” said Grant, adding that they will allow people to “feast their eyes on images that have really not hit the mainstream before.”“The scholarly text from the 1970s, ’80s, and ’90s that interpreted those images has now been readdressed to focus on current scholarship on images of blackness, which has changed substantially over the last 20 years.”Other volumes will be published in the spring and the fall of 2011. In addition, the Du Bois Institute and Harvard University Press will publish two new volumes on the 20th century in 2014/2015.On Monday (Nov. 15), several scholars involved in republishing the first four volumes took part in the M. Victor Leventritt Symposium on “The Image of the Black in Western Art” at Harvard’s Barker Center.Jeremy Tanner of University College London explored the concept of race and representation in ancient art, noting that certain Roman art depicting black people also may have conveyed conformity “to the semantic norms of the dominant social and racial group.”He noted that Roman sculptures of black people of high status, those identified by Frank Snowden, a major scholar of blacks in antiquity, were done in white marble. “These elite blacks certainly did not identify themselves as black in their choice of marble, perhaps because such an image would have seemed just too close for comfort to the black marble images of servants and slaves.“The different character and saliency of racial prejudice and racial stratification in the societies of antiquity compared with Western modernity should not be mistaken for their absence,” he added. “Rather, racial prejudice and racial stratification were simply differently configured, both socially and culturally. The visual arts of antiquity, appropriately read, offer some of the most revealing evidence for delineating the configurations of ancient racism, which they participated in constructing as active material agents.”The institute and Harvard Art Museums are also hosting “Africans in Black and White: Black Figures in 16th- and 17th-Century Prints” in the Neil L. and Angelica Zander Rudenstine Gallery. The exhibition includes works by Albrecht Dürer, Hendrick Goltzius, Rembrandt, and Peter Paul Rubens.“This is one of the truly great archival projects in the history of African, African-American studies, and the history of art,” said Henry Louis Gates Jr., Alphonse Fletcher Jr. University Professor and director of the institute. “I am honored that at Harvard it is being reborn and completed at the Du Bois Institute and published by the Harvard University Press, and fulfills the great dream that Neil Rudenstine had when he brought it here in the first place.”Gates and David Bindman, the 2010 Sheila Biddle Ford Foundation Fellow at the institute and emeritus professor of the history of art at University College London, edited the new collection and contributed a preface for the series.last_img read more

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New weapon against breast cancer

first_imgHarvard Stem Cell Institute (HSCI) researchers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) and collaborators at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) have identified a molecular marker in normal breast tissue that can predict a woman’s risk for developing breast cancer, the leading cause of death in women with cancer worldwide.The work, led by HSCI principal faculty member Kornelia Polyak and Rulla Tamimi of BWH, was published in an early online release and in the April 1 issue of Cancer Research.The study builds on Polyak’s earlier research finding that women already identified as having a high risk of developing cancer — namely those with a mutation called BRCA1 or BRCA2 — or women who did not give birth before their 30s had a higher number of mammary gland progenitor cells.In the latest study, Polyak, Tamimi, and their colleagues examined biopsies, some taken as many as four decades ago, from 302 participants in the Nurses’ Health Study and the Nurses’ Health Study II who had been diagnosed with benign breast disease. The researchers compared tissue from the 69 women who later developed cancer to the tissue from the 233 women who did not. They found that women were five times as likely to develop cancer if they had a higher percentage of Ki67, a molecular marker that identifies proliferating cells, in the cells that line the mammary ducts and milk-producing lobules. These cells, called the mammary epithelium, undergo drastic changes throughout a woman’s life, and the majority of breast cancers originate in these tissues.Doctors already test breast tumors for Ki67 levels, which can inform decisions about treatment, but this is the first time scientists have been able to link Ki67 to precancerous tissue and use it as a predictive tool.“Instead of only telling women that they don’t have cancer, we could test the biopsies and tell women if they were at high risk or low risk for developing breast cancer in the future,” said Polyak, a breast cancer researcher at Dana-Farber and co-senior author of the paper.“Currently, we are not able to do a very good job at distinguishing women at high and low risk of breast cancer,” added co-senior author Tamimi, an associate professor at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Harvard Medical School. “By identifying women at high risk of breast cancer, we can better develop individualized screening and also target risk reducing strategies.”To date, mammograms are the best tool for the early detection, but there are risks associated with screening. False positive and negative results and over-diagnosis could cause psychological distress, delay treatment, or lead to overtreatment, according to the National Cancer Institute (NCI).Mammography machines also use low doses of radiation. While a single mammogram is unlikely to cause harm, repeated screening can potentially cause cancer, though the NCI writes that the benefits “nearly always outweigh the risks.”“If we can minimize unnecessary radiation for women at low risk, that would be good,” said Tamimi.Screening for Ki67 levels would “be easy to apply in the current setting,” said Polyak, though the researchers first want to reproduce the results in an independent cohort of women.last_img read more

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VIRUS TODAY: US vaccine appointments canceled amid shortages

first_imgAn increasing number of COVID-19 vaccination sites around the United States are canceling appointments because of vaccine shortages, due to a rollout so rife with confusion that even the new director for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention admitted over the weekend that she doesn’t know exactly how many shots are in the pipeline. States are waiting to find out their latest weekly allocation of vaccines. For days now, governors and top health officials have been complaining about inadequate supplies and the need for earlier and more reliable estimates of how much is on the way so that they can plan accordingly.last_img

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The Lion Begins Performances Off-Broadway

first_img The Lion is a true story of love, loss, family loyalty and the redemptive power of music. The show has been previously performed in various incarnations at Lincoln Center, the St. James Theatre in London and the Edinburgh Fringe Festival. Songs from the tuner are featured on Scheuer’s album, The Bridge. Take a look at the music video for Scheuer’s song “The Lion” below! The Lion Benjamin Scheuer’s autobiographical musical The Lion begins performances on June 10 at City Center. Scheuer stars in the piece directed by Sean Daniels. The limited engagement will open officially on June 26 and run through July 13. Related Shows Show Closed This production ended its run on July 13, 2014 View Commentslast_img read more

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Fletcher King profits up 40%

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

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